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Rock is new class of Mars meteorite

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posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 12:39 AM
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A dark lump of rock found in the Moroccan desert in 2011 is a new type of Martian meteorite, say scientists.

Weighing 320g, the stone has been given the name Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034.

Its texture and chemistry set it apart from all previous objects picked up off the surface of Earth but known to originate on the Red Planet.

The researchers' analysis, reported online this week by Science magazine, shows the meteorite to be just over two billion years old.

The study was led by Carl Agee from the University of New Mexico, US.

"It has some resemblance to the other Martian meteorites but it's also distinctly different in other respects," he told BBC News, "both in the way it just looks in hand sample, but also in its elemental composition."

There are just over 100 Martian meteorites currently in collections worldwide. They were all blasted off the Red Planet by some asteroid or cometary impact, and then spent millions of years travelling through space before falling to Earth.

www.bbc.co.uk...





posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 01:50 AM
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Very interesting that Mars used to have water.

I've been watching Meteorite Men, cant get it out of my mind, any one here have any idea about how to sell one of these things? Is there a list on the net of meteorites around the world and where they were found? There was someone on here who sold meteorite jewelery, hav eyou got any insight in to the business?
edit on 4/1/13 by Cinrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 01:58 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


Sorry old chap no, however I have watched the series myself and have actually wondered the same...............I HAVE A RIPPER OF ONE! Not sure it's worth an aweful lot? But it's twice the size of the one in the picture and jet black and glassy! Mmmmm nice



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


OH, and Mars still has water (Poles). Also the Rover should pick up signs real soon...fingers crossed.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:02 AM
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Originally posted by CaptainBeno
reply to post by Cinrad
 


I have watched the series myself and have actually wondered the same...............I HAVE A RIPPER OF ONE! Not sure it's worth an aweful lot? But it's twice the size of the one in the picture and jet black and glassy! Mmmmm nice


That sounds really great, I would love to have something like that on my desk. I live in a dry part of the big red land myself and was wondering how hard it would be to find them like they do on the show, especially being a low density population area.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


It was actually a really easy find! It stuck out like dog B*lls, just like on the program. I was out Kalgoorlie way looking for Gold and pow, there it was! Mind you, it's the omly one I have come across other than Iron ore, and there is a hell of a lot of that stuff around, especialy if you head up North towards the Pilbara or Kimberleys. Saying that, you would problably find more gold than you would Meteorites! Worth a go though! Just tak a GPS and water with you if you go bush! You never know when you are going to get lost! Gold / Meteorite Fever!!!



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 06:09 AM
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Ahh, yes, I live in the golden triangle in Vic in a town full of gold seekers, and that is what I was thinking, they should stick out like dogs b**lls. I did hear years ago something about being able to find them in the desert because of the same reason. I wonder how many gold seekers around here have dug up a piece of meteorite and thrown it away. They say there are people who have walked over a fortune in diamonds looking for gold. Speaking of which, I need to look up the price of antimony.

Just looked: $10 a kg. There used to be an antimony mine not far from here, surrounded by all the gold diggings. At that price you would need large scale mining to make it worth while.

Back to the OP, it would be cool if they could identify the area of Mars where it came from, one day they might even be able to find the meteorite that hit Mars that threw the rock in to space that hit the Morrocan desert on Earth!
edit on 4/1/13 by Cinrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 06:12 AM
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Great find!

S&F!


(we don't have to agree on everything, but this is pretty cool
)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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I do not believe they can KNOW these rocks really came from Mars. There must be thousands of places in the solar system alone these rocks could have come from. Even if we had actual Martian rock samples in hand and they matched exactly, it still doesn't mean anything with the billions of planets meteors asteroids moons comets etc that are out here in the universe.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


My question exactly. How do they know it originates from Mars? Have they cross-tested the sample?

I would love to add something like this to my stone/gem collection, just the fact that it was floating around in space for millions of years is incredible. I wonder if something like that could hold onto space radiation?



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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I have a rock I believe to be a meteorite. It is solid black in color, very smooth and heavy for it's size(about the size of a golf ball but in a teardrop shape).

I think the stone I have was in a river for a very long time, that is how I think it got it's tear drop shape and smoothness.

Is there an easy way to tell if it is a meteorite or not? Without expensive scientific tests?

Cool thread! S&F


*edit* My digi camera batteries are dead or I would try to post a pic(my phone is old w/out camera too)
edit on 1/4/2013 by mcx1942 because: fix
edit on 1/4/2013 by mcx1942 because: edited



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by mcx1942
 


Could that possibly be Tektite? It is the result of asteroids/comets impacting with the earth and leaving a soft-ish black "rock". I have one as well and thought its disappointing it isnt a meteor rock it is still amazing that it is a result of something from space



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by mcx1942
 


Will a magnet stick to it?



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 12:29 AM
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reply to post by Cinrad
 


Good question! Great idea, I'll get back to you once I rustle up a magnet(not sure if I have one).
I should of thought of that, that is exactly the kind of home made test I need. Nice and cheap.
Thanks for the tip



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by mcx1942
 


Not all meteorites are made of iron but most of them. If it is iron or high iron rock then the next step is to investigate where it was found, if it is downriver of a valley that has iron ore, then it is not conclusive.





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