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'MONSTER' charged particles coming from the centre of our Galaxy

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posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by The X
 


Well that doesn't sound good.!




posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
? @ 2.2 million mph how long would it take to reach 100 million years away?

Nice find

It's not measure in "years"...it's measured in "light years"...which is not the same as earth years. A light year is:
186,000 mi/sec x 60 sec/min x 60 min/hr x 24 hr/day x 365 days/yr



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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Originally posted by BlowinSmoke

Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
? @ 2.2 million mph how long would it take to reach 100 million years away?

Nice find

It's not measure in "years"...it's measured in "light years"...which is not the same as earth years. A light year is:
186,000 mi/sec x 60 sec/min x 60 min/hr x 24 hr/day x 365 days/yr


www.space.com...





To learn more about these Fermi bubbles, the researchersanalyzed the parts of the sky including these regions using the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia as part of the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS). They detected giant outflows of gamma-ray-emitting gas, two cone-shaped lobes that combined are about 50,000 light-years long.


"That is about half the size of the entire Milky Way," Carretti said. Seen from Earth, the outflows stretch about two-thirds across the sky from horizon to horizon.


[color=gold]
Each of these lobes is about 13,000 light-years wide, and made of gas traveling about 2.2 million mph (3.6 million kph).

"Beside the galactic disc, these are the largest structures ever discovered in our galaxy," Carretti said.

These outflows are about 100 million years old, and apparently spew mostly from supernovas within the compact 650-light-year-wide area surrounding the supermassive black hole at the core of the Milky Way. Supernovas are the most powerful exploding stars in the universe, bright enough to momentarily outshine their entire galaxies.


****This is why I asked how long would it take traveling 2.2 MILLION mph it didn't say ly so misunderstood. Thanks for clarification. Still at that speed a more accurate question is what region would these gamma rays be at as of now if you visualized the Milky Way from above divided in 3rds where are these rays at 100 million years ago emitted? CAN ANYBODY PRODUCE AN ACCURATE ANSWER?
edit on 1/3/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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Charged particles in a wave pattern being expelled FORTY MILLION LIGHT YEARS up and down from the center of our galaxy...

Move along everyone nothing to see here!


Actually, I do remember new ages theories that talked about "energy" coming from the center of the galaxy, sweeping towards it's extremities that enlighten everything in it's path. Could this be what started on December 21?

Just one random example : www.ramaji.org...

This is quite interesting to say the least.
I would also like to point out that I am mostly open minded about new age ideas and don't blindly adder to it's philosophies and beliefs.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13

Originally posted by BlowinSmoke

Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
? @ 2.2 million mph how long would it take to reach 100 million years away?

Nice find

It's not measure in "years"...it's measured in "light years"...which is not the same as earth years. A light year is:
186,000 mi/sec x 60 sec/min x 60 min/hr x 24 hr/day x 365 days/yr


www.space.com...





To learn more about these Fermi bubbles, the researchersanalyzed the parts of the sky including these regions using the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia as part of the S-band Polarization All Sky Survey (S-PASS). They detected giant outflows of gamma-ray-emitting gas, two cone-shaped lobes that combined are about 50,000 light-years long.


"That is about half the size of the entire Milky Way," Carretti said. Seen from Earth, the outflows stretch about two-thirds across the sky from horizon to horizon.


[color=gold]
Each of these lobes is about 13,000 light-years wide, and made of gas traveling about 2.2 million mph (3.6 million kph).

"Beside the galactic disc, these are the largest structures ever discovered in our galaxy," Carretti said.

These outflows are about 100 million years old, and apparently spew mostly from supernovas within the compact 650-light-year-wide area surrounding the supermassive black hole at the core of the Milky Way. Supernovas are the most powerful exploding stars in the universe, bright enough to momentarily outshine their entire galaxies.


****This is why I asked how long would it take traveling 2.2 mph it didn't say ly so misunderstood. Thanks for clarification. Still at that speed a more accurate question is what region would these gamma rays be at as of now if you visualized the Milky Way from above divided in 3rds where are these rays at 100 million years ago emitted? CAN ANYBODY PRODUCE AN ACCURATE ANSWER?
edit on 1/3/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)

100 million years old????? That's RIDICULOUS. It's seems like science is a bunch of "educated GUESSES".



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by BlowinSmoke
 


lol
does make you wonder.
can anyone answer. Its like there's a compute block there with this kind of distance time math.
edit on 1/3/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


It only takes light 26,000 years to reach Earth from the center of the galaxy. Particles are a different story and depend on several factors.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:28 PM
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The big black hole is having indigestion from eating up some neutron star maybe?
I cant beiele that there is a fifty light year jet of ebergy shooting out the axis of the spital galxie without some wave motion of some kind acting at 90 degrees to it....the jets are aopposed to each other which indicates forces going out laterally at least....along the plane of the eliptic.....
Might be slower or faster doesnt matter, it will get here sooner or later.....
We are entering a charged cloud in this quadrant of space anyways....



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 

reply to post by Josephus
 


If the question is how long will it take to reach 100 years away, the answer would be 100 years...

But that is beside the point.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Bone75
 


yes but they are Gamma rays? not just particle movement of dust or space debris?



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by PhysicsAdept
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 

reply to post by Josephus
 


If the question is how long will it take to reach 100 years away, the answer would be 100 years...

But that is beside the point.


@ this question: how long would it take the Gamma bubble ENERGY traveling @ 2.2 MILLION mph to reach here EA*RTH is certain ly distance from it. Still at that speed a more accurate question is what region would these gamma rays be at as of now if you visualized the Milky Way from above divided in 3rds where are these rays at 100 million years ago emitted?
edit on 1/3/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


The gas isn't moving in the direction of Earth, but if it were, we can estimate the math like this:

The gas travelling at 2.2million miles per hour is roughly travelling at 611 miles per second (2200000 / 60 / 60 = 611).

Light travelling at 186000 miles per second (the speed of light) takes 30000 years to reach Earth, from the galactic centre.

So we need to find the difference between the speed of light and the speed of the gas: 186000 / 611 = 304.418. This means the gas is moving roughly 304 times slower than the speed of light.


We can then times the difference by the time it takes light from the galactic centre to reach Earth: 30000 years x 304.418 = 9132540 years.

EDIT: Of course, the gas would have to be moving in a straight line, which it isn't, so that is the minimum amount of time it would take to reach us.
edit on 3-1-2013 by AmatuerSkyWatcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 10:45 PM
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Paul Laviolette and The Galactic Superwave!

starburstfound.org...

Thanks for posting OP!

S&F



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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That is one of the coolest things I have ever seen, it kinda makes me want to write a metal album about space.

I wonder if one day that is to be our destiny, to be part of the giant plumes of energy blowing out of the center of our galaxy. We are all made of stars.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 11:18 PM
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This is not an "explosion" coming our way. It is part of the superstructure of our galaxy. It is the outflow of the galactic dynamo. The universe is electric.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by Noobastronomer
 


OP a question about that very interesting pic you've posted. From a victim suffering with 0 knowledge of astronomy.
Why does there seem to be a perimeter where the stars just stop and then beyond that perimeter there is only a blackness ?

SnF of course.
edit on 3-1-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


I believe you are pointing out the lens effects of the telescope??






High-resolution panoramic image of the full night sky, with the Milky Way galaxy as its centerpiece





The Milky Way through a Fisheye Lens, from Kitt Peak National Observatory.
edit on 4-1-2013 by Noobastronomer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:10 AM
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And the force that emanates from the center that is tied to and affects everything in the Galaxy... is...

gravity.

Can't you feel its pull? It made you respond to this thread.



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:24 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
And the force that emanates from the center that is tied to and affects everything in the Galaxy... is...

gravity.

Can't you feel its pull? It made you respond to this thread.





I'm Pretty sure it had something to do with me having some time to spare...
edit on 4-1-2013 by Noobastronomer because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by stillwind
This is not an "explosion" coming our way. It is part of the superstructure of our galaxy. It is the outflow of the galactic dynamo. The universe is electric.


Well said. What they found is a jet of high energy discharge from stars. The solar winds and supernovas from the galactic center get shot out into space. And we see it because we "hear" the radio emissions from the jets. Radio waves are emitted naturally from highly charged events, like a lightning strike for example.

What you have to remember is the picture with the blue jets is a composite picture, the jets were imaged using Radio Astronomy, and superimposed on a picture of the milky way's core from earth's perspective, obtained using optical astronomy. To give viewers like us some orientation. Some idea how to imagine what they are talking about. If you go to the link of the OP, here is the pictures caption; "This shows the “geysers” (in blue) shooting out of the Milky Way. Credit:Optical image – A. Mellinger, U.Central Michigan; radio image – E. Carretti, CSIRO; radio data – S-PASS team; composition – E. Bresser, CSIRO"

I don't understand why people got kind of worked up over this, it is no danger, it is just another part of our galaxy, if it were a danger, we wouldn't exist. That much energy would destroy any life bearing planet in seconds, it'd be like the radiation of 1000 stars blasted at you. If we were in line, life here wouldn't have happened.

Read more at: phys.org...



posted on Jan, 4 2013 @ 03:15 AM
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. Some idea how to imagine what they are talking about. If you go to the link of the OP, here is the pictures caption; "This shows the “geysers” (in blue) shooting out of the Milky Way. Credit:Optical image – A. Mellinger, U.Central Michigan; radio image – E. Carretti, CSIRO; radio data – S-PASS team; composition – E. Bresser, CSIRO"




You really don't have to follow the link for the details of the image....Its right there in my Original Post


edit on 4-1-2013 by Noobastronomer because: (no reason given)





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