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The Most Mind-Blowing 3-D Printed Objects of 2012

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posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 09:24 AM
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Forgot to say thanks for the thread, this is one of my favorite topics and you rarely see them one here, unless it involves printing guns



 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 




posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Sakrateri
 


You want a 3d printer to do what you can already do at home for a fraction of the cost?



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by aivlas
reply to post by Sakrateri
 


You want a 3d printer to do what you can already do at home for a fraction of the cost?




You are quite correct if you are just talking about your average garden variety sugar cookie. However, a 3-D cookie printer as part of a custom bakery business model would make sense. Having a unit with four nozzles, and therefore able to print a cookie in four colors, with say a 12" square bed opens up all kinds of possibilities for custom designed birthday, anniversary, Christmas or any other occasion cookies. Then add a second 3-D printer set up to print frosting in four colors or with interchangeable heads for food grade color inkjet printing and the possibilities would be nearly endless. And it has already been proven that people will pay good hard earned money for just such "vanity" food items. If you don't think so, just visit any "big box" store with a big bakery section and look at the variety of customized bakery goods already available using old fashioned baking and frosting techniques. And, I think I have already seen the food grade inkjet printer able to print from a scanned picture onto a white frosting background so adding 3-D technology to the rest of the baking and frosting process isn't much of a stretch.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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Originally posted by korathin
But dense holograms would make it even easier. Simply replace each holographic atom with a real one and presto: converted a holographic object into a real object. But that is technology well beyond what we are capable of.


Worse still, holograms don't work that way...except on Star Trek. They took a perfectly good word and made it into a macguffin. It's a plot device, not a physics one.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by aivlas
 


You dont seem to understand how this would work..

The ingredients would be in a powder form for most foods which would have an indeterminate shelf life value and all of these ingredients would be in an out of the way room specifically built for just such a purpose and connected to your kitchen via a conveyor belt on the printer.

Powdered meat (mmm, soylent green) would be in one tank and like flour in another, a sugar powder in another, powdered milk, water in another which would be the only liquid you would need for anything ever made because anything else can be made into powder form.

You would have a electronic keypad in the kitchen to put in the number for the food you want, the machine would print it and deliver it to the kitchen via the conveyor.

You would only have to pick this up and place it in the oven to cook, probably the microwave or whatever and you have dinner or dessert or what have you.

The main thing here being the ingredients with a much longer shelf life which means a lot less waste of food and a lot cheaper prices for everyone and because this is all a powder form a lot of it will be able to be made from man made ingredients which also solves future starvation problems .

The cookie was just a start of what is coming and what is possible.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 

You´re clutching on straws!
Still, the point is, I don´t think key copying will be a great issue, because as others said, too, there are other simpler ways if you want to open the lock. You can write about 1/10000000 possibility about a case where a key lies around or is in perfect optical reach and the perp has a 3D scanner with him. And then, you need to take several scans from several perspectives!



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by StareDad
reply to post by unityemissions
 

You´re clutching on straws!
Still, the point is, I don´t think key copying will be a great issue, because as others said, too, there are other simpler ways if you want to open the lock. You can write about 1/10000000 possibility about a case where a key lies around or is in perfect optical reach and the perp has a 3D scanner with him. And then, you need to take several scans from several perspectives!


If you can identify the blank, it's not as hard as you think to make a key from a really good photo.

Locks have a fixed rather small number of tumblers, there are a very limited number of positions they were cut to. For most locks, you're talking something like six tumblers with maybe four to six levels of split. That's not that many possibilities. If you have a good photo, you can make a small set of keys that likely will open the lock. Of course, a good picker can open most locks about as fast as having a key. Especially if you're using an inertial opener.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


I know all that. I have a pickset and a training cylinder 2m away from me. I can open the cheaper padlocks (3pin) with the spanner only, most in under 5 seconds. It´s not that I´m not aware of all that. The point is, 3D key copying in cases where you have time with the key and the key is being scanned are not gonna be a big issue. That was my point from the first moment.

 


Originally posted by unityemissions
I can't believe I have to explain this to you. This is getting ridiculous... ATS.

In your scenario, I must be in physical possession of the object, take it to a shop to get copied, and then return it before someone notices.

In my scenario, one must merely be around a key which can be digitally scanned. I don't have to possess it.

Did you seriously not consider this?

Freaking ridiculous.

GTFO

I laugh.
So what´s merely around the key in your definition? Do you think the key you need will be on a table or what? You´ve no clue. Don´t you think it will be curious to others if you walk up in the environment where the key will be lying around with a 3D scanner? You need several scans from the top. You can´t scan the key from the keyribbon of a security. It´s not like taking a photo. Do you know how accurate a key must be to adjust all pins in the lock to let the core rotate? You´re so far away from reality.

My point remains right and you should read and thought not just read and reply.
3D key copying will not be a big issue.
You need physical holding because you have to rotate it. Especially for Mul-T-locks keys or laser carved ones.

I was right all the time and now have the balls to admit it, especially if you call "GTFO".
edit on 6-1-2013 by StareDad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:40 AM
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Originally posted by StareDadYou´re so far away from reality.

My point remains right and you should read and thought not just read and reply.

You are so far away from reality.


No, not really. For any lock series, the number of tumblers and possible tumbler positions is very limited. A good photo is all you need. You don't need to make multiple 3D scans, because the set of possibilities for a commercial lock is small - they're using a very limited number of pin lengths.

However, it's likely easier to train someone to use an inertial opener. The rubber band ones work pretty well. For cylinder locks, it's even easier. I've got both electric and rubber band ones, and a nice manual pick set that includes riffle picks and a selection of cylindrical lock picks. And an inertial padlock opener.

edit to add: you can easily do it with an impression box too

second edit: also, you might try actually looking at the posts and trying to tell which poster is what. You're replying to the wrong person.
edit on 6-1-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-1-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam

Originally posted by StareDadYou´re so far away from reality.

My point remains right and you should read and thought not just read and reply.

You are so far away from reality.


No, not really. For any lock series, the number of tumblers and possible tumbler positions is very limited. A good photo is all you need. You don't need to make multiple 3D scans, because the set of possibilities for a commercial lock is small - they're using a very limited number of pin lengths.

However, it's likely easier to train someone to use an inertial opener. The rubber band ones work pretty well. For cylinder locks, it's even easier. I've got both electric and rubber band ones, and a nice manual pick set that includes riffle picks and a selection of cylindrical lock picks. And an inertial padlock opener.
edit on 6-1-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)


The text you quoted was meant to be for united.
Because of the quote and the line I thought you would notice maybe.

I know that its possible to make one from a photo but consider the probability. You and me, we both open locks for fun and sometimes I do it for my Dads company. We both know, 3D scanning keys will not be a big issue. In reality, there are no key lying around for taking a look. Either you get a photo, you get them in your hands or they are hanging in a glass case (emergency key) for example, or you don´t see them ever at all. Last one is 90% of all cases.
edit on 6-1-2013 by StareDad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:12 AM
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Originally posted by StareDad

I know that its possible to make one from a photo but consider the probability. You and me, we both open locks for fun and sometimes I do it for my Dads company. We both know, 3D scanning keys will not be a big issue. In reality, there are no key lying around for taking a look. Either you get a photo, you get them in your hands or they are hanging in a glass case (emergency key) for example, or you don´t see them ever at all. Last one is 90% of all cases.


Was always told that it was verboten to allow someone to take a photo with facility keys showing. And it's a bad idea.

link 1
link 2 (pdf)
link 3

But of course, you can just use a blank key and a small triangle file and make a key by impressioning, but it's faster to use an inertial opener.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


If you have one.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by StareDad
 


If you've seriously got to get in somewhere without using a shotgun with breaching loads, it behooves you to carry a lockaid, some riffle picks and the padlock opener. And the cylinder picks - it's really nigh impossible to open a Coke machine without them, you never know when you might need one in a foreign land.



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


For (official) cases like this, I simply bore the lock or drill a hardened screw into the core and use a "knackrohr" don´t know the english word for it. I had a case were a relate called in the middle of the night I simply used this because their 2 year old daughter was in there and the stove was running. Nothing is faster if it doesn´t matter if the lock is damaged.
www.sgh-schmitz.de...
edit on 6-1-2013 by StareDad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2013 @ 04:59 AM
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reply to post by StareDad
 


I think knockrohr is a Morgan knocker or slide hammer here. That'll do it too, but it's noisy. Although not as bad as using a dust load in a short pump shotgun.

I lived south of Munich for years when I was in my twenties. Your English is way better than my German has ended up.
edit on 6-1-2013 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)






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