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Sea floor next to Australia's Great Barrier Reef 'close to collapse'

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posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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First we find out that we are destroying the coral reefs with pollution and with help from nature in the form of warming sea temperatures, and now it looks like one of the reefs is getting ready to strike back.

SOURCE


Scientists have discovered a giant slab of collapsing sea floor near Australia's Great Barrier Reef which is starting to break and could eventually trigger a tsunami.



The researchers, whose findings were published in the journal Nature Hazards, said the one cubic kilometre slab in the Coral Sea – dubbed the Noggin Block – "eventually will collapse".

The ominous slab was discovered by geologists who have been using 3-D mapping techniques to build a picture of the sea floor along the deepest parts of the reef.


After reading the article and the comments section I have to ask, "Is this an imminent threat or not?". Is the author sensationalizing it for the sake of writing an article for pay, or should the Aussies be preparing to move inland to higher ground?
edit on 1-1-2013 by happykat39 because: typo




posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


I thought coral reefs thrive in warm water. Thats why they're there in Australia. A slight rise in temp will make not one bit of difference to them.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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The article never says how big this 'giant slab' actually is. They say it's huge but how huge are we talking?

How close is 'close to collapse'? Any minute, any year, any decade?

Maybe this article is doing a little fear mongering or maybe tomorrow a sink hole will open and swallow me whole. Regardless, we can't live in fear of it 'events' happening, we need to be aware just how valuable life is and enjoy it while we can.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
The article never says how big this 'giant slab' actually is. They say it's huge but how huge are we talking?


The size is quoted in the OP as being a one cubic kilometer slab.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by EnigmaAgent
reply to post by happykat39
 


I thought coral reefs thrive in warm water. Thats why they're there in Australia. A slight rise in temp will make not one bit of difference to them.


They are quite temperature sensitive and have been damaged in several places around the globe by rising temperatures in the seas where they live.

Global Warming Has Devastating Effect on Coral Reefs, Study Shows


Eight years after warming seas caused the worst coral die-off on record, coral reefs in the Indian Ocean are still unable to recover, biologists say.
edit on 1-1-2013 by happykat39 because: added info



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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We have been warm before and will be warm again just the way it is



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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Here are the detailed findings that were published in the Journal of Natural Hazards.

Potential collapse of the upper slope and tsunamigeneration on the Great Barrier Reef margin, north-eastern Australia


Semi-empirical equations indicate the collapse of this mass would yield a 7–11-m high three-dimensional tsunami wave. These waves could reach an estimated run-up height at the coast of 5–7 m.




After reading the article and the comments section I have to ask, "Is this an imminent threat or not?".


It doesn't look like it's going to happen any time soon, but you never know.


Critical peak horizontal accelerations of 0.2–0.4 g would lead to the failure of the
Noggin block. In north-eastern Australia, these values would correspond to
earthquakes generated at short hypocentral distances and short periods, which have
not been observed in instrumental records (i.e. the last 150 years)
.
edit on 1-1-2013 by Zarniwoop because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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Maybe I'm just thinking in simple terms here and I understand the enormous nature of the undertaking but....Why don't they simply destroy this in pieces?

The story doesn't say it may fall someday but that it will. So, it's not about triggering an event or "damage" that may not otherwise happen. It will. The question is only how much damage outside that immediate area it may do when it does go..right?

So..., especially given water's very helpful characteristic of reflecting 100% of a blast's force, couldn't this expanse be seeded with explosives to literally fragment the overall structure? The threat of the tsunami just comes in that large a mass falling as a single piece and moving the water as a single mass, right? So ...make sure it cannot collapse as a single mass.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Interesting idea, but probably way too early for that, as they don't have a whole lot of confidence in their estimations.


This study represents a first step towards a more detailed investigation of slope failure
dynamics and landslide-generated tsunami risk along the north-eastern Australia margin.
Uncertainties in our models relate mainly to input parameters due to the lack of available
data in the study area.


Plus, it would be hard to find anyone to step up and take the risk and liability for that kind of job and most likely impossible to find anyone to insure it.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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very interesting find .. and a good read .. thank you....

www.upi.com...


tho i thought to add to it and add my findings about it on the web.... its a good thing to keep a close eye on...

It is a pretty big chunk of sea-floor [in] the very slow, early stages of starting to break away from the edge of the Great Barrier Reef," said Dr Robin Beaman, a marine geologist at James Cook University.







enjoy the read



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Our Earth is fragile.

Are we causing the effects?

I believe we are to a part......But....

I am sure a thousands of years ago there were places that marveled our most treasured places we have now.

Mother Earth will have her way, regardless on what a few ants do to it.



S&F



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by happykat39

Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
The article never says how big this 'giant slab' actually is. They say it's huge but how huge are we talking?


The size is quoted in the OP as being a one cubic kilometer slab.


Must have overlooked that. Whoa.. that's pretty big. That could change some things.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by Zarniwoop

It doesn't look like it's going to happen any time soon, but you never know.



Earthquakes can certainly advance the process.

Though I'm not sure how many occur on the coast of Australia.
edit on 1-1-2013 by six67seven because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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I did a post about this in fragile earth forum about two Weeks ago. Guess I'm not a popular enough user to get it any attention.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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Sure Wrabbit well just drill and sink a nuke of sufficient size to topple it prematurely.....then well be safe......

I wonder if this is in any way triggerable by further earthquakes to the horth where the sea floor did collapse on that boxing day quake....
I think they must be part of the whole general collapse of the pacific or indosnesian? whatever... plate in that area....
Think of a soccer ball...the area is about the same size on earth as a section on a soccer ball....its rght under the Indian ocean.....the GBR on the south side of the patch, and the other quake on the north edge....



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 08:50 PM
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In my opinion, this is all part of Agenda 21. Queensland in Australia is one state that is actively and aggressively implementing this agenda.


Australia says it will create the world's largest network of marine parks ahead of the Rio+20 summit. The reserves will cover 3.1 million sq km of ocean, including the Coral Sea. Restrictions will be placed on fishing and oil and gas exploration in the protected zone covering more than a third of Australia's waters.

Environment Minister Tony Burke, who made the announcement, will attend the earth summit in Brazil next week with Prime Minister Julia Gillard. "It's time for the world to turn a corner on protection of our oceans," Mr Burke said. "And Australia today is leading that next step." Australia has timed its announcement to coincide with the run-up to the Rio+20 Earth Summit - a global gathering of leaders from more than 130 nations to discuss protecting key parts of the environment, including the ocean, says the BBC's Duncan Kennedy.


faultlineusa.blogspot.com...

If one is interested in Queensland and Agenda 21, please read about the Brigalow Corporation and ownership of land in Queensland.
edit on 1-1-2013 by deessell because: extra info



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by six67seven
 



Though I'm not sure how many occur on the coast of Australia.


They are saying in the report that the type and volume of earthquakes necessary to collapse the Noggin Block (based on a lack of available data) haven't occurred in the last 150 years of recording earthquakes.

That either means it is highly unlikely to happen, or it is overdue.

Kind of like playing a slot machine. Timing is everything



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 03:31 AM
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they probably found this error by mapping the reef sea floor because they are dredging our beautiful waters so the pricks can build 6 coal seam gas ports absolutly disgusting



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 05:21 AM
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Originally posted by bkaust
I did a post about this in fragile earth forum about two Weeks ago. Guess I'm not a popular enough user to get it any attention.


All you forgot to mention was divers with guns will save the day.

On topic.............

There is an even bigger one off Hawai. Hundreds of cubic kilometers.

Need to go and find a link before edit time runs out....

Watch this space..



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by EnigmaAgent
reply to post by happykat39
 


I thought coral reefs thrive in warm water. Thats why they're there in Australia. A slight rise in temp will make not one bit of difference to them.


I was under the impression that coral reefs were very sensitive to temperature changes. The logic just doesn't make sense either. Just because they thrive in warm water, it doesn't mean there isn't a sensitive upper threshold.






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