Stop smoking (Allen Carr the easy way my [snip]RANT

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posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 11:12 PM
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In my family, my grandmother was hypnotized 25 years ago and has never had a cigarette since. Then my father and I were both hypnotized at the same time 20 years ago and he hasn't had a cigarette since. About 8 years ago my first time being targeted by an IED, as soon as I made it back to the base in Iraq I went straight to the PX and bought a carton and forced myself to start smoking again. So being hypnotized would've worked for me also but as bad as things were going over there I figured wth might as well enjoy my Marlboro's.

If you find cold turkey too difficult you might consider being hypnotized it works well for some people. Just a suggestion. Good Luck.




posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 03:43 AM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


Hey GypsyK

im not wanting to overly force advice on you,


i Smoked for about 11/12 years at some points alot a day but on average a pack, over the last year i slowly treid to cut down, a half pack a day etc. then i just stopped buying them a "borrowed" one off my smoking mates when needed, then i just tried to not be around folk smoking, not going out drinking and generally doing other things, this seemed to be the "game changer" for me as it meant i wasnt in the presence of smokers and was well out the habit of buying them by then, on a very odd occasion a month ago or so i could slip up after 4\5 hours of smoking because of an event, but generally over the last four months i could count the amount of cigarettes i have had in two hands, and pin point them to specific events where i have probably been "too drunk"


i tell you this not for advice, but so you know i found it hard, but i feel after the last month i have got there now, whatever receptors in the brain were craving the nicotine just dont seem to be doing so as hard as before, i feel better for it, the last year was crap, i felt worse than i have felt in a long time, no nicotine mixed with colds, flu's and general lung pain as i transition from smoker to normal not killing myself for tiny pleasure human being.. its nice now



anyway, hang in, keep going and good luck



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 05:24 AM
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Depends who you are. I quit smoking bang, easy. I scoffed at the idea that cigarettes had some other wordly power over me, that it was some behemoth of addiction, something everyone pedestals and makes out to be difficult. Pffff

I really think what helped me stop cold is that ego. When it comes to some things I have an ego, and if i really say I'm going to do something, my brain won't allow me to fail. Some people have that failure mind set, that niggling self doubt, a fear of the difficulty, but I brainwashed myself to contrary.

I set myself up to win. Too much bragging beforehand about my mental strength, about the ease in which I'd quit at the snap of my fingers. That helped, because I didn't want to look like a jackass or be a weak minded person like all those others who can't quit without being babied.(no offence to anyone here, but that's just how I prepared myself mentally, by telling myself such things - it was an exercise in ego)

but I did struggle(of course, nobody knew it), and so here's a big thing I found myself doing that helped me:

Originally, the first few days where the cravings are worse, a way I countered them was to put myself in situations where I didn't smoke. This doesn't work for everybody it depends what your smoking habits were like, it might not be feasble. Here's an example of what I mean.

When i smoked i smoked mainly when i was downstairs at my computer, or watching tv. When lying in my bed playing video games or watching tv, or reading, I never really had the urge to smoke and could stay up there for hours(or a whole day if hungover lol without smoking), so I took to avoiding what I deemed my smoking zones. I ditched the computer, for the most part, for a few days, because im always breaking for cigs while using the computer. At work, again, easy, because i never smoked at work apart from at lunch breaks, so that's many hours on each side without smoking.

also the smoking buddies, that would never have worked for me. I couldn't think of anything worse than talking about my quitting. I'd rather people just shut up about it to tell you the truth. Just seeing cigs pop up in movie scenes had my craving lol


good luck, it's get easier and very fast. Once you get the confidence froma day or twos quitting, and break the routine, it just gets easier and easier



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 09:15 AM
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40 hours and counting....
It seems to be getting easier.
Spending less time behind a computer and trying to keep busy with more intense activity does the trick for me during the day (house cleaning, garden cleaning, etc)..... thank god I'm working the next 3 days, tomorrow is the opening of the sales month... that will keep me going without thinking about cigs or food all day long

thanks again for all the replies



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 05:17 PM
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Hang in there, GypsK!

I've made substantial progress over 25 years in quitting, and in 2013 I feel confident I'll succeed, because smoking doesn't seem beneficial any more (and once I would tell perfect strangers how much I loved smoking). The only reason I've smoked at all of late has been to try to relieve stress from a VERY difficult situation--and it didn't help.

The group support of Nicotine Anonymous has been helpful (there are on-line smoking cessation websites as well). Changing people, places, things, and ideas and (surprisingly to me) the idea of spirituality in smoking cessation have been helpful, too.

But everyone is different, and each person is different at different times. I suggest continuing to read a variety of smoking cessation literature, since each author has different techniques and philosophies which you may or may not connect with. And keep trying if at first you don't succeed.

Good luck to both of us!
edit on 2-1-2013 by Jumbles because: spelling



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


Physically, it's 3 days until the nicotine is out of your body. If you can make it 3 days then yes, the rest is mental. And the cravings do start to come fewer and far between. Right now you may want a cigarette every 10 minutes. In 6 months, you'll want a cigarette 3 times a day. A year... so on and so on. I've gone through the cold turkey quit process and, in my opinion, it's the best way to quit. BUT your mind will never stop wanting that cigarette. 10 years from now you'll get a craving once every 6 months. It never goes away entirely.



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


It took me about 4 years of failed attempts at quitting smoking before I was able to get the job done. I would quit and go on patches for 3 months then within days of getting off the patches I would have "just one" cig and boom I was smoking again. I did this over and over again until finally I went on the chocolate/non tobacco cigs for a couple weeks and it was done. The last time I had a cigarette was March 1st, 2011. Every now and then I get a craving for the flavor of a cig but it passes by in less than a minute. The biggest issue I had was the craving of the flavor, I was able to shore up that craving by brushing my teeth after eating or drinking anything (except water), so that my pallet remained clear. Hope some of this helps, you can do it.



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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Hang in there!

I quit 3 years ago, cold turkey, Alan Carr, etc.

Long story suuuuuuuper short, the hardest part wasn't the nicotine cravings, or looking for something to do when I was bored. It was relearning my day to day life. Re-establishing my routines, avoiding bars and clubs for the first few months.

Learning that I didn't need the smokes only came after that part. Once I was able to retime my habits (go outside, smoke, get in car, drive to store, smoke, drive to work, smoke, go to lunch, smoke, go home, smoke, smoke smoke smoke smoke etc) and redo my routine, it was like cigarettes were never there.

I was a pack+ a day smoker for over a decade, if that helps.

I believe in you, and know you can do it. Stay strong!



posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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After 54 years of smoking, I quit cold turkey. I know you don't want to hear that but it happened.

I developed a lung infection (aspirated a couple of little veggie chunks-- I think, as I coughed them up after being on the antibiotics.). The second the doctor said lung infection, my head said "stop smoking", as I didn't want a bunch of "I told you so's " when I died of lung cancer, and it would be on my death certificate.( Now I thought that in a nanosecond, far faster than it took to type it.)

It was not a planned quit, but it was the 'punch' that hit home and it worked. 2 years passed on November 17, 2012.

There are times I crave but it is the 'something to do with my hands" thing? or sometimes a particular time of day or occasion? but not daily. It's more like a thought and I just say to myself, 'You don't smoke!"...... but get a craving for Chinese Food, it won't go away until I order in and eat some.

Peace



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 06:53 AM
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One of the tricks is you must keep busy. The more busy you keep your mind, the less time you have to focus on smoking and what you're "missing out on". The truth is you're missing out on nothing, you have taken the step to become a normal person again. The nice feeling you get when you have a cigarette and inhale, is just the same feeling that a normal person gets everyday from something else like eating or drinking. If you say you smoke when stressed and it makes you feel less stressed, how does a non smoker cope with stress then?

Nicotine starts to leave the body immediately after you've put the cigarette out and within 24hrs there is no nicotine left in the body. What you have left is habit and the fear of "doing without". How many times have you run out of cigarettes and panicked? Then found one or a pack you didn't know you had then immediately felt better even though you hadn't actually HAD a cigarette? Just the thought of knowing you had a pack does away with the fear so the actual cigarette does little other than create a fear of NOT having one!

I smoke,always have for 35yrs. Some days I hate it some days I enjoy it. Now I'm reaping the rewards of training my body to smoke, if I don't quit within the next 3-4 months I will lose my right leg due to circulation probs. My eyesight has deteriorated due to narrowing of the blood vessels, I can't breathe properly, taste anything, and I snore like crazy due to blocked sinuses etcetc. The thing is, as a smoker you make excuses and justifications for your ridiculous habit. Even the fear of losing a leg doesn't sink in. If the effects of smoking were visible i.e. my leg was turning black with each cigarette then maybe it would register, but as its all invisible damage most of us ignore it. We insist we feel fine and have no smoking related problems because it will never happen to us and because we have ALWAYS felt like that so we know no different.

I never realised peas had a taste lol until I had to go without cigarettes whilst in hospital !!!

This time I have to stop. Cutting down won't work, it creeps back up, so at the moment I'm on the chewing gum and will probably try the Champix.

I don't need a cigarette but the very thought of not being able to have one makes me want one!! And that is the clincher....its all thought and I know this but its far far easier to light one up than not. Sad but true for me at least

Bad habits are hard to break but clearly can be done




posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


Hey man,

First off, congrats on having the strength and determination to stop smoking. It's such a horrible psychological trap and non-smokers will never understand the constant mental anguish of feeling like you're trapped forever with it.

That being said, "The EasyWay to Stop Smoking" is your best bet. Unfortunately I smoke again due to not being vigilant the first time I quit. I managed to stop for the best part of a year using Allan Carrs book and at no point was there any withdrawal, pain or moments of weekness when I wanted to smoke. His method is fantastic.


For those who don't know about the book/teaching it basically boils down to removing the psychological addiction before physically stopping. He doesn't use fear tactics shocking you with health stats. He doesn't keep drilling it in to you how expensive it is or how ashamed you should feel.


All i can say is try again. If the book wasn't effective try reading it slower and really thinking about all the little nuggets of information in there that hit you personally. Take time to digest them and slowly unravel your own addiction. Failure in this situation should be viewed as almost positive - how many people chose not to try and stop smoking?

Hang in there man, I'm in the process of reading the book again and this time I will quit for good. Good luck to you and anyone who is going through this very personal problem.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by RicketyCricket
Hang in there!

I quit 3 years ago, cold turkey, Alan Carr, etc.

Long story suuuuuuuper short, the hardest part wasn't the nicotine cravings, or looking for something to do when I was bored. It was relearning my day to day life. Re-establishing my routines, avoiding bars and clubs for the first few months.

Learning that I didn't need the smokes only came after that part. Once I was able to retime my habits (go outside, smoke, get in car, drive to store, smoke, drive to work, smoke, go to lunch, smoke, go home, smoke, smoke smoke smoke smoke etc) and redo my routine, it was like cigarettes were never there.

I was a pack+ a day smoker for over a decade, if that helps.

I believe in you, and know you can do it. Stay strong!


That's a good way of explaining it thanks and I hadn't quite thought of it in such simple terms - relearning my daily habits, i love it. I managed to quit, but started stupidly over a breakup. Determined to stop again, and for good.

I wonder if we could get a group smokers together here on ATS and do a live stop smoking megathread where people can drop in every few hours or once a day to fill people in on how it's going and be supportive and encourage each other. Would be good to have people who had already stopped too.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by canadiansenior70
After 54 years of smoking, I quit cold turkey. I know you don't want to hear that but it happened.

I developed a lung infection (aspirated a couple of little veggie chunks-- I think, as I coughed them up after being on the antibiotics.). The second the doctor said lung infection, my head said "stop smoking", as I didn't want a bunch of "I told you so's " when I died of lung cancer, and it would be on my death certificate.( Now I thought that in a nanosecond, far faster than it took to type it.)

It was not a planned quit, but it was the 'punch' that hit home and it worked. 2 years passed on November 17, 2012.

There are times I crave but it is the 'something to do with my hands" thing? or sometimes a particular time of day or occasion? but not daily. It's more like a thought and I just say to myself, 'You don't smoke!"...... but get a craving for Chinese Food, it won't go away until I order in and eat some.

Peace


That's pretty much how my dad quit about 5 years ago, problems with his lungs and then bam, he just gave up, said he wanted to see his grandkids grow up. I was shocked, I've never smoked personally but have seen many friends and family try and quit. I don't believe there is a one-stop way, everyone has a different motivation. Another friend of mine, whom I hadn't realised had quit some time back, was asking his facebook friends what he should do with the money he's saved, he's now booked a worldwide cruise. I hope you succeed and wish you all the best luck finding your way through it.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 08:16 AM
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I quit with an electronic cigarette - here's my diary (not been updated in ages).

It was still tough for and kept feeling okay that I'd stopped then having immense cravings.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


I feel ya. I quit smoking 32 yrs ago when I found I was pregnant. I did not smoke again until I went on a road trip with my hubs doing most of the driving. I then smoked for another eight years and just quit again; not for me but so I would have ammunition and bitching rights to get my hubs to quit his habit as his lungs are getting bad. (I have got him to cut down) I know I should not bitch and moan but he will never quit on his own. He sits on the side of the bed coughing up a lung and then lights up.

I have been off for about two weeks and I would absolutely love a cig. But, I don't need one. My problem is that I am/was an emotional smoker, and now I am an emotional eater, gained five pounds. Drs don't understand this. I am a bit more irritable; my cats are in hiding and my dogs keep giving me funny looks when I don't find their antics amusing.

I don't know when you are going to feel better. It is different for everyone. (I quit cold BTW) I have found that doing some physical activity helps the cravings, at least for a while. Drinking lots of water and having raw veggie snacks handy, both help getting through.

Good luck to you. Do the best you can and tell everyone else to go eff themselves if they give you a hard time. We are all wired differently.



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by GypsK
 


To me the reason I kept smoking was boredom and daily routine , at work it was morning lunch and afternoon break , at home it was boredom

I began to quite smoking by firstly reducing my daily intake, first off I only smoked ten a day , which pales in comparisson to some hardcore smokers on 40 - 50 a day !

I made myself quit by reducing my intake , then making myself feel disgusted with myself whenever I smelt the smoke on my hands or when I passed someone in the street . At that point I was just down to 3 a day , then i thought I'd give it a go cold turkey ! I did it and now I will smoke the odd cigarette when Im out drinking on occasion , but I havent bought a pack in like the last 8 years . it's different for other people , just keep trying the solution is out there for you !A friend tried everything from hypno therapy and all that stuff and still didnt work , then he quit cus he had a kid !



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 12:50 PM
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Only 4 hours away from the 72 hour mark! One way it makes me proud of myself that I made it this far because I honestly didn't expect that. I can only hope that it's uphill from here on.

To stop smoking is a very intense process.
I have this inner dialog about smoking that never seems to stop, almost as if I'm bargaining with myself, one side of me is trying to remember all the reasons I stopped smoking in the first place, while the other side of me is looking for excuses to throw all those reasons overboard and light one right away. Some moments I'm feeling oh so sorry for myself, while I'm to irritated to have compassion with anyone else. It's all about me, me, me!
My kid and husband are avoiding me when possible.... and I think I lost a few clients in my store today.

Sometimes I'm convinced I will make it and never smoke again, other times I'm thinking that if I still feel this bad by Monday I will smoke again. I'm telling myself that my life will have less quality and that I will never be truly relaxed again without smokes.Luckily my husband is there to keep reminding me that I didn't even like the last cigs I smoked, that I was always saying how bad they tasted, how I detested the smell in clothing and the nicotine on the ceilings. Not to mention the bad taste of an ashtray in the mornings after a night out. It's true, I detested my cigarettes and now I'm acting as if gave up the most valuable thing in the world.
It doesn't make sense at all. It's junky mentality...

thans for all the tips and support, I'm reading them all!



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 12:50 PM
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double post, pls delete
edit on 3/1/2013 by GypsK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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My wife and I are cigarette free for 17 months now. This is my 4th time quitting, and I'm not sure how many times my wife has tried.... First I'll describe what didn't work for me:

1. Cold Turkey - this only works for people who didn't really smoke in the first place. You know the ones I'm talking about - the 3 cigarette a day smokers. Us pack+ a day smokers can't do that BS.
2. The Patch - never really worked for me. I think it's the lack of repetitive motion. The damned patches would get stuck to my clothes and get ripped off without my knowledge, and I would want to smoke.
3. The Losenge/Gum - since they're similar, I'm lumping them together. I only tried the losenge though. These things are nasty. If they'd flavor them like mint - or a cough drop (kill 2 birds right? I mean, I was coughing anyway)
4. Chantix - OMFG!! My wife and I both went psycho. We separated for 6 months. After 2 months, we both quit the Chantix and regained sanity.

What did work (so far, and I'm optimistic) is the e-cig. Now, please understand - I'm not trying to sell anything, so I won't mention brands, but I must mention that the ones that look like cigarettes are garbage! Look for the types that have separate batteries and liquid tanks. Don't get any type that requires you to buy refill cartridges - you'll spend more than smoking. You can get into it for as little as $40 including enough liquid to keep you going for a week or two.

Here's the method I'm using - and it seems to be working fine. The e-liquid comes in multitudes of flavors, and with varying levels of nicotine. I started with 26mg nicotine and over the last 17 months I've worked my way down to 24, 20, 18, 16, 12, 8 and now 4mg (which I've been at for about 3 months). The liquid itself is either vegetable glycerine (VG) or propolene glycol (PG), with a flavoring. I use PG because hospitals use it in breathing treatments.

The first week (or so, it's up to you) is a transition. Keep smoking! This isn't a light switch you have to flip. Eat the Turkey while it's warm, then snack a little, then when it's cold you make a sandwich. Sooner or later you'll reach a point where you don't want it anymore. At least, that's how it worked for me. While I was working, when it was time for a smoke break, I would take a few puffs on the e-cig. If I wasn't satisfied, I would head out and have a smoke. Increasingly, I was becoming more and more satisfied with the e-cig. The first day, I still smoked a pack of cigarettes. The second, less than a pack. The third and fourth day was about a half a pack each. The fifth, 6th and 7th day was my last pack of cigarettes. I must say, the 7th day was the hardest, not because I wanted to smoke, but because I didn't want to smoke (cigarettes) and I still had 3 cigarettes left. I scheduled times to go out and smoke my last 3 cigarettes - just so I could have a defining event that would signal the end of my smoking days. It was really hard, because after the transition occurs, cigarettes become really gross.

A 30ml bottle of liquid costs between $5 and $10 depending on flavor, where you get it and if there's a sale. Maintenance parts are very cheap, and the whole proposition is so much less expensive than smoking that I've built up a kit that has enough replacement parts and 3 batteries so I will never have a breakdown that might make me want to buy cigarettes again. My wife and I have bought complete kits and given them as gifts. We save (collectively) about $300/month, and only spend $40 or so on liquid. My next step is from 4mg nicotine to none with just flavored liquid. My next step is to ween myself off of the habit of puffing.

You can do it! I feel better every day - and I know you will too!
edit on 3-1-2013 by stutteringp0et because: clarification



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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Never got into that stupid habit, but have had friends and family that did.

One of the things to consider (other than improvements to your own health) as a reward for quitting is having that extra money in the bank. Maybe you get to go out more often (movies or nice dinners), something to save up for a nicer vacation, maybe it's a bit extra to add to the rainy-day fund (or put into investments if you have enough saved otherwise), or perhaps having a bit more cash to put into a hobby such that you can upgrade your R/C gear or get that videogame you've been wanting.





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