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Man Captures Video Of Strange Explosion In The Sky

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posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
A meteor would also not last long enough for the photographer to shoot it. Make a phone call. And shoot it some more.

Wouldn't that depend on zoom, on the telescope and how far the object is, also velocity?




posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by BigfootNZ
 





Sooo where is the vid then? All we get is a single frame of the 'object' blowing up... which looking at it is exactly identical to a shooting star I saw break up in the night sky above a few years back. Err so he tried selling the footage on Craigslist a week before taking it to the media, and they (CBS) got a second opinion from a Vatican expert... oh kay.. and im assuming the reason the CBS site hasnt got any of the video on it is because Mr Prychodzko wanted to keep all rights to it which would mean he still wants to sell it. My verdict... guy was lucky enough to capture a meteor breaking up and threw a little glitter on the story, or someone did. Unless we get to see the entire vid thats all id say we can think it was... or any other simple explanation.


Umm WTH??? are you reading the same post as everyone else? There is video and he was trying to sell his telescope on Craigslist not the video.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:32 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


Meteors move ultra fast. That object was in our atmosphere. The total amount of time we are talking about here is minutes. Nah.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by ModernAcademia

Originally posted by Phage
A meteor would also not last long enough for the photographer to shoot it. Make a phone call. And shoot it some more.

Wouldn't that depend on zoom, on the telescope and how far the object is, also velocity?


Not much. You're not likely to find a meteor that lasts more than a few seconds.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:39 PM
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Phage, you nailed this one bang on.


For those that are wondering about the smaller "orbiting" object:

Keep in mind that weather balloons all have instruments (one, two, or more) attached by a long tether. Weather balloons can range from small to massive in size, so they can appear quite bright and large when viewed through the eyepiece of a telescope.

If you watch the original video closely, you can see that the smaller object is not "orbiting", but instead it's swinging back and forth behind/above and from side to side the descending weather balloon.

And this guy makes no mention of any astonomical unit distance he had his telescope sited for (what size eyepiece he was using, what part of the sky he was viewing, etc), thus we can't assume he's looking into deep space just because he's looking through a telescope... Hell, I can count the freckles on my neighbours arse with my telescope, as well as view a deep space messier object. It's all a matter of what you set up your scope for.

*cough*
... ignore that last part mentioning my neighbour's arse...
*cough*



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by ikonoklast
reply to post by skepticconwatcher
 


I thought it was weird they contacted the Vatican too. But Phage pointed out that the Vatican has an observatory (which is also perhaps a little strange).


The Vatican also has the largest library of supernatural material, the Observatory there was established in the 1700's as Astronomy was of interest then as it is now and was instrumental in the implementation of the current calender system.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:10 PM
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What a priceless thread.

Thanks guys.


Taken down a peg or two.


Love it



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by ModernAcademia

Originally posted by Phage
A meteor would also not last long enough for the photographer to shoot it. Make a phone call. And shoot it some more.

Wouldn't that depend on zoom, on the telescope and how far the object is, also velocity?


Not much. You're not likely to find a meteor that lasts more than a few seconds.


That's right, didn't NASA et al design their re-entry vehicles to mimic how a meteor behaves entering the atmosphere. The fire from the sky is usually done and dusted in seconds because it is mostly the exterior surface that is ablated off, even if some of it did reach the ground it is more likely to be cold rather than hot.

"The concept of the ablative heat shield was described as early as 1920 by Robert Goddard: "In the case of meteors, which enter the atmosphere with speeds as high as 30 miles per second, the interior of the meteors remains cold, and the erosion is due, to a large extent, to chipping or cracking of the suddenly heated surface. For this reason, if the outer surface of the apparatus were to consist of layers of a very infusible hard substance with layers of a poor heat conductor between, the surface would not be eroded to any considerable extent, especially as the velocity of the apparatus would not be nearly so great as that of the average meteor."
That excerpt from Wiki. (no link)



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:36 PM
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To lend a bit more help to the weather balloon theory...
Most telescopes will refract the image upside down unless they are equipped with a "diagonal", which make the image upright.

If his telescope didn't have this piece of equipment then the image of the weather balloon looks as it does on the newscast...


Say, for instance, he did have the diagonal lens when filming it. Then it would have come out as it should, right side up... which now matches other videos of weather balloons exploding at high altitudes.



As always, speculation



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by Screwed
Douchy McDoucherton said they were unsure at this time what the object could be.



thats immaturely hilarious too



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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Oh, that is so totally swamp gas. Everybody knows that swamp gas floats up to the sky and enhances Venus! Geez



Yeah, lucky he didn't sell that phone.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by Pauligirl

Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by ItDepends
 


Look back to the last page. Phage was diligent enough to track down the station that launched the balloon in question. I made a suggestion...someone could simply email the weather station in question and include a link to the fine journalism we see present in the OP. Ask them yourself if that is there balloon.

Look at it this way - you can be the one that debunks the debunk and confirm this as an anomylous event.

I'd do it myself, but I am sorta guaging this as a Social Experiment at this point...

***Their balloon! Jesus
edit on 31-12-2012 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)


Since I came late to the party-I emailed the weather station to ask if was their balloon, gave a link to the news station and one to this thread. If I get an answer, I'll post it.
Happy New Year everyone!


While the page was for Oakland. my email went to a fella at the Department of Atmospheric Science
University of Wyoming-but he answered me. Still trying to find a contact for Oakland


It isn't my balloon, I work for the University of Wyoming.
It does look like a weather balloon from the National Weather Service. These are launched
from Oakland twice per day at around 3:30 Pacific Standard Time.
The balloon expands until it bursts at around 1000,000 feet.
It take about 2 hours for the balloon to rise to this altitude. The winds were from the
southwest on this day so the the timing and position are consistent with what was observed.
The radiosonde package is about the size of a box of tissues. It is attached to
a small chute and then to the balloon by a long sting. This would explain the
two small lights orbiting the larger balloon. At 100,000 the balloon and package
would still be illuminated by the sun at this time of day.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:44 PM
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Another smoking gun thats quick to be shoved under the ever growing buldge of a rug...I think if its of manmade origin it may be a satellite that got hit by something,other wise who knows what it could be...



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Nice of him to respond so promptly.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


Ahh, excellent point !

I never even thought about the possibility of him not using a star diagonal to upright his viewing image.

It was odd that the descending balloon would be in front of the instrument(s) since the balloon is much lighter than the instruments... there's no way that a falling balloon would speed ahead of heavier objects... but now it makes sense. We're looking at a video that's upside down and mirror reversed.

Thanks for the reminder !



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by TheMur
Another smoking gun thats quick to be shoved under the ever growing buldge of a rug...I think if its of manmade origin it may be a satellite that got hit by something,other wise who knows what it could be...


How can it be a smoking gun if you don't know what it is? that's kinda desperate sounding.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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It's clearly this...



SMR

posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Razimus
 


There should be no more speculation or discussion at this point. You nailed it it with solid proof of a weather balloon.



posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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posted on Jan, 1 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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At last!

Something that actually is a weather balloon.





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