Helpful suggestions for dealing with an apparent night time visitor to my little boy

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posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by w810i

Originally posted by anton74
Well, if he is convinced the Boogeyman is real, you need to make him feel like he is in control. Maybe have him place some traps(like Mouse traps) in what he feels are likely spots. Maybe buy him a toy"Magical" Battle Axe to slay the beast and inform him that he will become a hero if he does so. Its like any other fear, you have to gain control.

For example, when I was a little kid I saw a Vampire movie and when I went to bed they were everywhere waiting to get me and chasing me in my dreams. My brother and I eventually made wooden stakes to defend ourselves just in case. Not long after that I had a dream in which I met some friendly Vampires and killed them all. After that I was afraid anymore.


Thank you for the suggestions

That is extremely bad advice. Doing those things will only help to reinforce his belief that something is there. Don't tell him it's fake and he's just seeing things straight out, but don't do anything which may imply that what he sees is real.




posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by sconner755
reply to post by w810i
 


Here's a suggestion. Try a different strategy for being a good parent besides posting questions about alleged night time visitors on ATS.

You're a parent. You have a little boy. You seriously think you're going to find an accurate answer here for what you son was frightened by?

Wtf...


Here is an even better thought...learn to completely read the OP. I asked if other parents have dealt with this sort of thing with their small children. As this is the first time I've encountered something like this.....

oh and wtf...
edit on 30-12-2012 by w810i because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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Originally posted by sconner755
reply to post by w810i
 


Here's a suggestion. Try a different strategy for being a good parent besides posting questions about alleged night time visitors on ATS.

You're a parent. You have a little boy. You seriously think you're going to find an accurate answer here for what you son was frightened by?

Wtf...


Do not judge or criticize his parenting skills because he is seeking advice online. Parenting isn't easy, and he is handling the situation in a mature way by taking the opinions of others who may have gone through something similar.



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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I don't what your faith is or even if you have a belief, but I am lifting your baby up in prayer for protection. Something is obviously freaking him out and he is seeing something. It's kind of hard to rule out nothing when he ran from his room to yours and it followed him. That must be devastating to a child to be tormented like that and the one who can protect you doesn't even see it. Or even worse, as another posted said, told you what you were seeing was fake and to get over it.






posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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Originally posted by sconner755
reply to post by w810i
 


Here's a suggestion. Try a different strategy for being a good parent besides posting questions about alleged night time visitors on ATS.

You're a parent. You have a little boy. You seriously think you're going to find an accurate answer here for what you son was frightened by?

Wtf...


My suggestion of Empowering the child is actually recommended by professionals.



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by anton74
 



My suggestion of Empowering the child is actually recommended by professionals.

I highly doubt that. Your advice will cause a classic case of belief reinforcement. Learn how the art of suggestion works. By suggesting that the child needs utilities to enable control over the entity directly implies that the entity does exist, and this will lead the child to believe that a real threat exists, potentially leading to increased fears and obsession over something which doesn't exist.

Your suggestion may be recommend when the child is facing a real life threat, but it is one of the worste courses of action you could take when the threat is basically imaginary or intangible.
edit on 30/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by johngalt722
 


Except for the fact you are invisible.



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by anton74
 



My suggestion of Empowering the child is actually recommended by professionals.

I highly doubt that. Your advice will cause a classic case of belief reinforcement. Learn how the art of suggestion works. By suggesting that the child needs utilities to enable control over the entity directly implies that the entity does exist, and this will lead the child to believe that a real threat exists, potentially leading to increased fears and obsession over something which doesn't exist.

Your suggestion may be recommend when the child is facing a real life threat, but it is one of the worste courses of action you could take when the threat is basically imaginary or intangible.
edit on 30/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)


So, you're saying you've never actually done any research on this issue? Please look it up and get back with me.

Edit: Your arguement could be used to describe anything the parent does besides telling the child it isn't real and go back to bed. That is the wrong thing to do. A nightlight could be considered a utility. You don't need to do it exactly as I stated, but it is important for your child to feel like they are in control of the situation. I've done this with my kids and you would be amazed how well this can work, not just for this but for other fears as well.
edit on 31-12-2012 by anton74 because: missed something



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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ROFL
not laughing at you OP, but at all the mincing around.
reply to post by w810i
 




Other then that I did notice the air was colder in that area.

that's a textbook indicator of a ghost

1st you need to ask your son if he knows who it is
[you wouldn't want to do an exorcism/banishing on the kids grandpa]
whether if the deceased is unknown to the child or not you need to explain to him
that ghosts and spirits can't harm him, unless he feeds them with fear
provide the child with a "ritual" this can be a special prayer or what have you tailored to your beliefs,
as of course we cant have the kid quoting from grimoires like the keys of solomon, etc.
and will serve him in good stead

have a spiritual worker [priest or medicine person] deal with the matter., as some ghosts will become even more problematic if you try yourself [and do a bad job of it]
the boy's ritual is for self-empowerment, do not lie to the child as he will subconsciously detect this [lying parents account for many of the psychological problems adults have] also do not tell him he is seeing things, as he is seeing something, just because similar strategies and LIES deprived you of the ability is no reason to poke the kids inner eye out.
edit on 30-12-2012 by DerepentLEstranger because: added comment



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 


As a little boy I used to have night terrors and see things, as I got older it got rarer but even now I still experience strange things from time to time.
Some people are more sensitive to things than others. All he needs is reassurance from his parents that he is safe.
It is more than likely to continue until he grows out of it a bit. Just reassurance from you will be enough.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by anton74
 



So, you're saying you've never actually done any research on this issue? Please look it up and get back with me.

Or perhaps you could provide me with a respected source which explains that the best way of dealing with imaginary threats is to pretend that those threats are real. I'm fairly certain you will find nothing because the psychology behind that course of action is fairly easy to reverse-engineer and work out that it's not the best course of action because it will reinforce the belief that a threat does in fact exist when it actually doesn't. Your advice could easily backfire if the child becomes absolute convinced that a real threat does exist.

This is basic psychology 101.
edit on 31/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:08 AM
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My 3 year old about 6 months ago woke up in the morning and say she was on a pink space ship with other kids and said so for a long time , it wasn't a bad dream . She had watched a movie with a pink spaceship in it . Their little imaginations are in overdrive they do remember what they see be it reality or a cartoon or what ever and do dream about it be it a pleasant dream or a nightmare . and could be a reoccurring dream. As that other guy mentioned night terrors .

Give you little guy some time and assurance he will be fine .



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:10 AM
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reply to post by w810i
 


I'm gonna be honest.. i'm a mother of 5.. and never once have any of my children gone through that kind of experience so i'm sorry to say I have no sage advise.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by anton74
 



A nightlight could be considered a utility.

Yes but a nightlight is useful against real threats too. It works because the child doesn't like being in a dark room where they can't see what's happening. That poses a real threat to them because there could actually be a burglar or something.

But giving them magic swords and ghost traps is absolutely absurd. Perhaps it may make them feel a bit safer, but it will also make them feel like the threat is real, which can be much much worse. What happens when the traps don't catch anything?

They are now going to feel completely defenseless against a threat which they now feel is so real it requires traps to stop it.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:33 AM
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He may possibly have seen a being of some sort.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


But what if there is such a thing as ghosts?

Think of it as teaching a child they are in control of their imagination.

Look up NLP. Confronting fears is an well developed technique.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:37 AM
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I would not say a word about it.

If he does have some type of gift...He's way too young to deal with it.

If he brings it up again....I would downplay the event.

Just my opinion as a Dad...

Best of Luck...Being a parent does not come with instructions.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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Not a parent myself so don't know how useful this is going to be, but one thing stood out from your post head and shoulders above everything else - your son sleeps with you frequently.

Probably every kid goes through a phase of waking in the dead of night scared stiff and making their way to their parents' bed for safety.

I certainly did and occasionally my mother would let me sleep in the bed; but my father would often berate me and make me get back in my own bed. I turned out fine, by the way.

It's up to you how you want to play it; offering your bed to your child is fine now and then, but I wouldn't encourage it.

And I never, but never "dived" into my parents' bed!


Sounds like he feels he doesn't even need to ask permission...maybe something you need to look at.

As for spooks...please.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by sconner755
 


Really? You're scolding someone for seeking advice? I would have done the same. Nothing bad about that. Think before you speak.

to the OP - I have a photographer friend who has recorded his toddlers on camera several times talking at the ceiling or doorway to things that "aren't there". It's interesting to say the least - I do believe in spirits but that may not be what is going on here.

Have you yourself had any experiences with hauntings? Children and animals are more open to seeing spirits and other activity that adults can not because they aren't as jaded as we are - yes I'm referring to the poster I have responded to.

A night light may help. Keep us posted if it happens again. Hopefully you can get the little guy to talk about what he's seeing or maybe have him draw some pictures of what he is seeing. If it's not a spirit or ghosts, then perhaps it is something he saw on tv or in a movie, etc.
edit on 31-12-2012 by Charmeine because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:45 AM
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When I was young, and the lights were out, and my vision had adjusted to the darkness, the corners of the room would sometimes recede and seem a million miles away. It made me feel like a speck of dust on the pillow. This never scared me, though I had more than my share of night terrors, according to my mom. Tell your son he is a circle, and that circles and squares don't ever hurt each other, cause they are different shapes.Children instinctively know the stuff we choose to forget and if it is in the corner it is part of the square. And tell him that you are his bigger circle, and that you are connected by a silver thread,and the thread is called Love( of course) and that if he is ever scared he must know that you are always around him to protect him with your Love. This is from my heart, hope it helps.
edit on 31-12-2012 by ezekielken because: (no reason given)






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