China launches sat-nav network to rival GPS

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posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 07:33 AM
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Beidou - named after the Chinese word for the Big Dipper constellation - offers an alternative to the US's global positioning system (GPS).

www.bbc.co.uk...

China has launched its domestic satellite navigation network built to rival the US global positioning system (GPS).

www.abc.net.au...




The start of commercial services comes a year after Beidou began a limited positioning service for China and adjacent areas.





State media reported the Beidou started providing commercial services to civilians in the Asia Pacific region on Thursday, and was expected to provide global coverage by 2020.









posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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i would love to see china's google earth version, the one the u.s. can't force to censor for "national security".

of course china will censor their sensitive installations, but not americas.

so if you add both of them together you'll get a real map.

but then again, the u.s. might censor access to them thru google and your service provider so if you access it anywhere in western control you'll be directed to their "fixed" chinese version without knowing.

edit on 28-12-2012 by randomname because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 08:16 AM
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It's great that we can stop using the US's stuff and get our own.
Since its inception, Beidou played a very important role in agriculture, public safety, telecommunications, and so on, especially during the rescue work of the Sichuan Earthquake and Olympic Games in 2008.

Who knows, one day there might even be a Chinese equivalent of ATS.

www.beidou.gov.cn...



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by diqiushiwojia
It's great that we can stop using the US's stuff and get our own.
Since its inception, Beidou played a very important role in agriculture, public safety, telecommunications, and so on, especially during the rescue work of the Sichuan Earthquake and Olympic Games in 2008.

Who knows, one day there might even be a Chinese equivalent of ATS.

www.beidou.gov.cn...


hope it all works out well and for the good of everyone



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 08:53 AM
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Pretty old news, and the purpose is obvious -- military technology, specifically drones and planes, is highly tied to accurate GPS data, and the US has the ability to re-inject the "Selective Availability" that existed prior to 2000 that reduced accuracy, on a moment's notice.

Russia, the EU and India are all putting up their own GPS systems, fundamentally probably for the very same reason, so the players of the next 100 years are probably defined fairly well. Any non-American military that relies on US GPS data is at a severe disadvantage, should a conflict arise.



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 09:11 AM
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It is a shame all countries could not have made a deal with guaranteed access and accuracy; each funding a small part of the GPS constellation.

I do not blame China or anyone else wanting their very own system for national security but again what a waste when there is no treaty/agreement of shared resources. Yes, I know would never work.



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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Originally posted by adjensen
Pretty old news, and the purpose is obvious -- military technology, specifically drones and planes, is highly tied to accurate GPS data, and the US has the ability to re-inject the "Selective Availability" that existed prior to 2000 that reduced accuracy, on a moment's notice.

Russia, the EU and India are all putting up their own GPS systems, fundamentally probably for the very same reason, so the players of the next 100 years are probably defined fairly well. Any non-American military that relies on US GPS data is at a severe disadvantage, should a conflict arise.


I wouldnt say its pretty old news, as the the articles states the Beidou has now been cleared for commercial use across the Asia-Pacific region. before, it had previously been restricted to the Chinese military and government.Beidou is targeting a 70-80% share of the Chinese market in related location services by 2020.



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by PLAYERONE01

Originally posted by adjensen
Pretty old news, and the purpose is obvious -- military technology, specifically drones and planes, is highly tied to accurate GPS data, and the US has the ability to re-inject the "Selective Availability" that existed prior to 2000 that reduced accuracy, on a moment's notice.

Russia, the EU and India are all putting up their own GPS systems, fundamentally probably for the very same reason, so the players of the next 100 years are probably defined fairly well. Any non-American military that relies on US GPS data is at a severe disadvantage, should a conflict arise.


I wouldnt say its pretty old news, as the the articles states the Beidou has now been cleared for commercial use across the Asia-Pacific region. before, it had previously been restricted to the Chinese military and government.Beidou is targeting a 70-80% share of the Chinese market in related location services by 2020.


It's old news, in that their first satellite launch for the system was back in 2000. Given that the US doesn't "charge" anything for their GPS system, it's not like this is a competitor in any way other than continuing to provide coverage if the US were to decide to restrict access to its system, though the vendor who has to opt between US and Chinese compatibility, I suspect that most non-military uses would tend towards the US system, regardless of where they were (outside of China, of course) as the US is viewed as a more stable and reliable system with over a decade of proven accuracy.



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen

Originally posted by PLAYERONE01

Originally posted by adjensen
Pretty old news, and the purpose is obvious -- military technology, specifically drones and planes, is highly tied to accurate GPS data, and the US has the ability to re-inject the "Selective Availability" that existed prior to 2000 that reduced accuracy, on a moment's notice.

Russia, the EU and India are all putting up their own GPS systems, fundamentally probably for the very same reason, so the players of the next 100 years are probably defined fairly well. Any non-American military that relies on US GPS data is at a severe disadvantage, should a conflict arise.


I wouldnt say its pretty old news, as the the articles states the Beidou has now been cleared for commercial use across the Asia-Pacific region. before, it had previously been restricted to the Chinese military and government.Beidou is targeting a 70-80% share of the Chinese market in related location services by 2020.


It's old news, in that their first satellite launch for the system was back in 2000. Given that the US doesn't "charge" anything for their GPS system, it's not like this is a competitor in any way other than continuing to provide coverage if the US were to decide to restrict access to its system, though the vendor who has to opt between US and Chinese compatibility, I suspect that most non-military uses would tend towards the US system, regardless of where they were (outside of China, of course) as the US is viewed as a more stable and reliable system with over a decade of proven accuracy.


The news is buddy as the article states:



the Beidou has now been cleared for commercial use across the Asia-Pacific


It is no secret that this system has been around for a while but the chinese have only been using it at home, now they are going to use it through out south east asia. its not rocket science mate.





 
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