Why does the word 'satan' translate to satan or something similar in all languages.

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posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


It was actually the Phoenecian's that the alphabet started with but what ever, you're close enough.




posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by asen_y2k
 


For the same reason "Mark" sounds the same in almost every language.

It is a name borrowed from another (older) language.



posted on Dec, 28 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by Hijinx
reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


It was actually the Phoenecian's that the alphabet started with but what ever, you're close enough.


Same people.



posted on Dec, 29 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by asen_y2k
 


Satan is very similar in virtually all languages because it's a term that has been brought over from Hebrew; it is also a proper name. Satan means "adversary" and so, if you want to find out what "Satan" is in other languages, you have to translate "adversary". Take Thomas as another example. Thomas means twin. If I "translate" Thomas itself similar names will occur. When I translate it's meaning though (twin) I can see the meaning is in other languages.



posted on Dec, 29 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by asen_y2k
 

most likely it should be because of monotheistic religions. satan is translated to sheitan in Arabic too.



posted on Dec, 29 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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Look up Police in different languages. This is the case with a lot of words.



posted on Dec, 29 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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That would be "poliisi" in finnish. Some words sound and look alike but a word like god in finnish is "jumala". So others are completely different.



posted on Dec, 30 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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Years ago, I saw in the Utne Reader, which is a sort of "Readers' Digest" of the alternative press, an article about Hell. The lead illustration showed the Buddhist version of Hell. It was all there, the familiar red devils with forked tails, horns, pitchforks, flames, etc. I realized that the biggest difference between the Christian Hell and the Buddhist Hess was artistic style. So, I began to wonder where our ideas of Hell came from.

Years later, my best friend hooked up with a group of visiting Japanese, and as a farewell present, they gave him a t-shirt depicting the Japanese Devil. Once again, he was red, with horns, and all the rest. So, I wondered some more.

Today, I'm a "Hell atheist" - I don't believe such a place exists, nor do people go to such a place.

It occurs to me that if "Satan" has a similar sound in so many languages, it may just be a fairly late development.

$0.02



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 12:57 AM
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reply to post by Lazarus Short
 

"Hell" as a place for the bad guys in the afterlife, doesn't exist in Buddhism, which would make sense... Buddhism has people reincarnating over and over and over, for better or for worse, with the only escape being nirvana.



posted on Dec, 31 2012 @ 02:05 AM
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Originally posted by babloyi
reply to post by Lazarus Short
 

"Hell" as a place for the bad guys in the afterlife, doesn't exist in Buddhism, which would make sense... Buddhism has people reincarnating over and over and over, for better or for worse, with the only escape being nirvana.


Ya think? My Buddhist best friend has told me about the "Hell Realm," but yes, to the Buddhist, Hell is more of a psychological (psycho-illogical?) state. Nevertheless, Buddhist depictions of Hell closely resemble Catholic ones.





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