Hadrian's hall: archaeologists finish excavation of Roman arts centre

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posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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Hadrian's hall: archaeologists finish excavation of Roman arts centre


www.guardian.co.uk

Archaeologists who have completed the excavation of a 900-seat arts centre under one of Rome's busiest roundabouts are calling it the most important Roman discovery in 80 years.

The centre, built by the emperor Hadrian in AD123, offered three massive halls where Roman nobles flocked to hear poetry, speeches and philosophy tracts while reclining on terraced marble seating.

"Hadrian's auditorium is the biggest find in Rome since the Forum was uncovered in the 1920s," said Rossella Rea...
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posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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It's being called a "massive discovery", and the largest find in Rome for the past 80 years (since the discovery of the forum). It was uncovered by crews digging a new subway line.



Hadrian's auditorium was called the "Athenaeum".

Hadrian was a prolific builder in his time, he is also responsible for the Pantheon in Rome, the first use of concrete in dome construction.

www.guardian.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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Very, very interesting. I've seen the Forum in Rome and this new discovery doesn't seem to be that far from it. I think that's also the Capitoline Hill behind it.



posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 



Great article thanks for posting.

It amazes my how much is still being discovered and uncovered these day.




posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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He certainly gets around, that lad.



posted on Dec, 27 2012 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer


It's being called a "massive discovery", and the largest find in Rome for the past 80 years (since the discovery of the forum). It was uncovered by crews digging a new subway line.



Hadrian's auditorium was called the "Athenaeum".

Hadrian was a prolific builder in his time, he is also responsible for the Pantheon in Rome, the first use of concrete in dome construction.

www.guardian.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)


You have to wonder how long before these buildings were built did they use concrete. We haven't changed concretes that much in a long time. Just think how slow practices were adopted back then.





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