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S. Korea release photos of debri from rocket...

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posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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www.globaltimes.cn...

Link to article and pictures.

What adverse effects, if any, will this cause on the environment?
Not to state the obvious, but couldn't this potentially add pollution? And where did that rocket hit?




posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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Oh now you worry about pollution and what not ...

What about when other "so called" peaceful Countries do tests all day long ... What about that?

But No No ... I understand, it's South Korea, they shouldn't be allowed to do any sort of test isn't it?



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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Originally posted by Pirateninjah
Not to state the obvious, but couldn't this potentially add pollution? And where did that rocket hit?



The rocket was launched directly south, so the first stage (debris pictured at your news article) splashed down just off the west coast of South Korea.

This link has pictures of thesplashdown zone.

The final stage reached orbit.



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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reply to post by faryjay
 


>>Implying I don't care when other rockets are deployed

I'm trying to open up a discussion here, not bash on S. Korea



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 05:14 AM
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Wasn't that rocket launched by North Korea and not South Korea?

If it was, aren't you all mixing your Koreas?



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
Wasn't that rocket launched by North Korea and not South Korea?

If it was, aren't you all mixing your Koreas?


According to everything I've seen, it was South Korea. I'm sure North Korea HAS launched them, but that has nothing to do with the link posted up top...



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by Pirateninjah
 


Why the title of the article is "S. Korea releases photos of debris from rocket recently launched by DPRK"?

The rocket was launched by DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), also known as North Korea. The debris of the first stage fell on the ocean near South Korea, so they recovered them and that's what those photos show.

Those debris obviously pollute the ocean, but only locally, as they are not that big and the fuel had already burned out.



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Ah, thank you for the info Mod! I need to learn some geography, it seems.

Using the 'laws of dispersion' (i think that's what it's called) Can't we assume that local pollution will seep everywhere? Granted, a miniscule amount.



posted on Dec, 24 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by Pirateninjah
 


Yes, it will spread, but I don't think that pollutes more than a common ship dripping some fuel, and we have thousands of those.





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