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"All Clear" given on potential 2040 impact of asteroid 2011 AG5

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posted on Dec, 22 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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I never even heard of this asteroid before, but apparently, it was considered a slight risk to us in 2040, and has just been reduced to 0 on Torino Scale, meaning there is zero chance of impact.

From official JPL release neo.jpl.nasa.gov...


NASA scientists have announced that new observations of 2011 AG5 show that this asteroid, once thought to have a worrisome potential to threaten Earth, no longer poses a significant risk of impact. The orbital uncertainties of the 140m diameter near-Earth asteroid had previously allowed a 0.2% chance of collision in Feb. 2040, leading to a call for more observations to better constrain the asteroid's future course.

Answering the call, University of Hawaii astronomers Dave Tholen, Richard Wainscoat and Marco Micheli used the Gemini 8-meter telescope at Mauna Kea, Hawaii to successfully recover and observe the small and very faint asteroid on October 20, 21 and 27, 2012. After extensive astrometric analysis by the team in Hawaii, all observations were then sent to the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

An analysis of the new data conducted by NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, shows that the risk of collision in 2040 has been eliminated.


The asteroid is approximately 140 meters across. It is estimated that an impact would produce the equivalent of 100 megatons of TNT, roughly twice that of the most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated (Tsar Bomba). This is powerful enough to damage a region at least a hundred miles wide. en.wikipedia.org...

Now, although I haven't heard of this asteroid before, a search turns up a lot of articles on this potential threat and the need for more observations and calculations. NASA themselves asked for help. This flies in the face of allegations that NASA and the government want to keep the threat of impact secret to prevent mass panic or for whatever nefarious purposes. I know for the fact that all newly-discovered objects are made public through the Minor Planet Center, and any astronomer with a decent telescope can participate in this science.




posted on Dec, 22 2012 @ 05:52 AM
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Holy crap, I clicked thinking there was yet another date of doom for mankind. I obviously misread the title. Thank you for letting us know that we WILL NOT be fried in 2040.



posted on Dec, 22 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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It's a Festivus miracle!



posted on Dec, 22 2012 @ 07:16 AM
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That's too bad. I was really hoping for an impact.



posted on Dec, 22 2012 @ 07:24 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


I did a video on this asteroid some time ago.

It was previously the most threatening asteroid out there. I hate to say it, but that no one seemed to be aware of it does not surprise me. People seem to fixate on fake space threats and accuse NASA of covering them up all while they ignore the real threats. "Never A Straight Answer" has become such a popular meme that if they said an asteroid was going to hit us, many would automatically believe the opposite. Dare I say it, but rampant conspiracy belief has lead to an increase in ignorance of actual possible threats.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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Wait...Are you even talking about 'Apophis'?



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 11:52 AM
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While it is true that they asked for help tracking this trajectory, they only did so because the threat was far enough out that if it WAS on a collision course they could possibly do something about it. I GUARANTEE you that if someone at NASA discovered an imminent threat that was say a week out and was an ELE we would not hear about it.
The amount of craziness that would ensue would be off the charts.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by ButterCookie
Wait...Are you even talking about 'Apophis'?

No. Back when 2011 AG5 ranked number one on the potential threat list, Apophis was number 8. That's just my point. People get so worked up about non-threats or very low threats they don't even realize there are much likelierthreats out there.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
While it is true that they asked for help tracking this trajectory, they only did so because the threat was far enough out that if it WAS on a collision course they could possibly do something about it. I GUARANTEE you that if someone at NASA discovered an imminent threat that was say a week out and was an ELE we would not hear about it.
The amount of craziness that would ensue would be off the charts.

I guarantee you amateur astronomers like me would know. They wouldn't need to cover it up for the same reason no one except a few amateurs like me knew about 2011 AG5. Most people don't pay attention to the real threats anyway. A few years ago a potential threat was hours from hitting us. They didn't cover it up and in fact an amateur was the one who ended up ruling out the possibility. The number of scopes and the widespread locations of amateur astronomers is a resource they need for determining what will really hit us and what won't.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


I GUARANTEE you that if someone at NASA discovered an imminent threat that was say a week out and was an ELE we would not hear about it.

Except that an object large enough cause an ELE would be, in all likelihood, discovered more than a week out. It would also be detected by amateurs. More than 900 such objects have been located. Statistical evaluations estimate there may be about 1,000 of them.

edit on 12/23/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Perhaps. But did we not get buzzed like twice recently by object that they "didn't see coming" until they were about two days out?

I don't think either was ELE sized, but it shows that objects can and do sneak up on us.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

Yes. Small ones can sneak up. Because they are small and hard to see.
If one of those does pose an impact risk and that impact was deemed to pose a risk to life appropriate evacuation measures could be taken.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 12/23/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Yeah. For those deemed worthy of saving. Haha



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


You mean only those "worthy" are evacuated from hurricane zones? Tsunami inundation zones?



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Well I'm talking about an ELE event. The logistics are slightly different.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

Well you're sort of yoyoing. First you talk about an ELE then about small objects that can "sneak up" now you're back to an ELE.

As pointed out, an object large enough to produce an ELE would be detected more than a few days in advance and it would be detected by amateurs all over the place so it could hardly be kept a secret.
edit on 12/23/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


As I said, perhaps. Perhaps not. You don't think its presumptuous to say it WOULD be detected?



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

In the last post I did. Not in the previous one.
But if it isn't detected at all there is no secret to be kept, is there?



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Going back to what I said initially... if it were discovered, say a week out, then no, we very likely wouldn't hear about it.

I personally think something like that SHOULD be kept secret. Not blaming NASA or implying anything nefarious here. Haha



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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But of course, if something is discovered years out, it only makes sense that they would seek all the help they could get tracking its trajectory. If you've got years, you can come up with a plan.





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