Scientist have solved the puzzle of Rudolph's nose

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posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 11:55 AM
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While all the other reindeers may have laughed at him and called him names, not letting him join in their games, it seems Rudolph the reindeer's red nose is invaluable at helping him carry out his Christmas mission.

Scientist have solved the puzzle of Rudolph's nose, claiming it is to stop it freezing and to help with the exertion of delivering presents to good children around the globe.

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Using a hand-held video microscope, they first assessed the noses of five healthy human volunteers and found a circulating blood vessel density of 15 mm/mm2.

When the technique was applied to two reindeer noses, the researchers found a 25 per cent higher density of blood vessels, carrying a super-rich concentration of red blood cells.

They also found a high density of mucous glands scattered throughout the reindeer noses, which they say helps 'maintain an optimal nasal climate during changing weather conditions and extremes of temperature as well as being responsible for fluid transport and acting as a barrier.'

Infrared thermal images showed that reindeer do indeed have red noses.

Professor Can Ince said: 'The microcirculation of the nasal mucosa in reindeer is richly vascularised and 25 per cent denser than that in humans.

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wiki.answers.com...

Although there seems to be some confusion with the correct names of the reindeer.


Two of the reindeer names, Donner/Donder and Blitzen, are often the source of confusion, misspelling, and misinformation. The short facts are these: Donner/Donder and Blitzen were named ''Dunder'' and ''Blixem'' (the Dutch words for ''thunder'' and ''lightning'') in the original printing of "A Visit From St. Nicholas." In reprints of the poem, the names became ''Donder'' and ''Blixen,'' then ''Donder'' and ''Blitzen'' (the latter being German for ''lightning'').


The findings were published in the British Medical Journal.

Ho HO!




posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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Finally! forget cancer this is they type of science we should be spending out money on!



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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The greastest mystery on earth has been solved!! Go Rudolph, Go Rudolph, Go Rudolph Go!

S&F!



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by dc4lifeskater
Finally! forget cancer this is they type of science we should be spending out money on!


Does someone need a hug?



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by L8RT8RZ
The greastest mystery on earth has been solved!! Go Rudolph, Go Rudolph, Go Rudolph Go!

S&F!


thank you,

youtu.be...






posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


The reason their noses are red are indeed, because of increased blood flow, but that is only done to keep their noses warm for when they greet other reindeer (by putting their nose in their junk). There is nothing more offensive to a reindeer than to greet them with a cold nose.

If it were actually done to just keep their skin warm, they would just have furry noses.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Again , just more disinformation and cover-ups.
The true reason for Rudolfs red nose should be obvious to all.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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Interesting. Thank you for sharing.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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Really? In the science forum?
I know you dudes get all mushy-mushy around this date but c'mooooon...



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 11:41 PM
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The question isn't why Rudolph's nose is red...it's why the other reindeer's noses are brown. And the answer is: because they can't stop as fast as Rudolph!





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