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Largest Egyptian Sarcophagus Identified

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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Merneptah, also spelled Meneptah, or Merenptah (died 1204?), king of Egypt (reigned 1213–04 bc) who successfully defended Egypt against a serious invasion from Libya. The son of Ramesses the Great (Ramesses II), Merneptah was the fourth Pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty.


The mummy of Merneptah was encased in a series of four sarcophagi, set one within the other. After his tomb was robbed, more than 3,000 years ago, he was reburied elsewhere and his two outer sarcophagi boxes were broken up.


Sarcophagus-278The largest ancient Egyptian sarcophagus has been identified in a tomb in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, say archaeologists who are re-assembling the giant box that was reduced to fragments more than 3,000 years ago.


I find this intruiging how the sarcophagi are like one of those Russian dolls.

Not only was the pharaoh's outer sarcophagus huge but the fact that he used four of them, made of stone, is unusual. "Merneptah's unique in having been provided with four stone sarcophagi to enclose his mummified coffined remains," said Brock in his presentation. (The 10 Weirdest Ways We Deal With the Dead)

Within the outer sarcophagus was a second granite sarcophagus box with a cartouche-shaped oval lid that depicts Merneptah. Within that was a third sarcophagus that was taken out and reused in antiquity by another ruler named Psusennes I. Within this was a fourth sarcophagus, made of travertine (a form of limestone), that originally held the mummy of Merneptah.


Why so big?

Why Merneptah built himself such a giant sarcophagus is unknown. Other pharaohs used multiple sarcophagi, although none, it appears, with an outer box as big as this.

Brock points out that Merneptah's father, Ramesses II, and grandfather, Seti I, both great builders, were apparently each buried in one travertine sarcophagus.


One motif the king appears particularly fond of is the opening scenes of the "Book of Gates," including one depicting a realm that exists before the sun god enters the netherworld, according to Egyptologist Erik Hornung's book "The Ancient Egyptian Books of the Afterlife" (Cornell University Press, 1999, translation from German). "Upon his entry into the realm of the dead, the sun god is greeted not by individual deities but by the collective of the dead, who are designated the 'gods of the west’ and located in the western mountain range," Hornung writes.

For the king repeating scenes like this over and over may have been important, it’s "as though they're trying to enclose the [king's] body with these magical shells that have power of resurrection,"

Full Article

How it may of been brought into tomb.

Brock explained the four sarcophagi would probably have been brought inside the tomb already nested together, with the king's mummy inside.

Holes in the entrance shaft to the tomb indicate a pulley system of sorts, with ropes and wooden beams, used to bring the sarcophagi in. When the workers got to the burial chamber they found they couldn't get the sarcophagi box through the door. Ultimately, they had to destroy the chamber's door jams and build new ones.



Archaeologists are re-assembling the outermost of these nested sarcophagi, its size dwarfing the researchers working on it. It is more than 13 feet (4 meters) long, 7 feet (2.3 m) wide and towers more than 8 feet (2.5 m) above the ground. It was originally quite colorful and has a lid that is still intact.





edit on 12/20/2012 by mcx1942 because: edited
edit on 12/20/2012 by mcx1942 because: edit




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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Now's my chance....

Sarcophagus envy?



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:05 AM
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Ok i will say it.

Big Mummas-house

more pictures here. www.livescience.com...
edit on 20-12-2012 by Fisherr because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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Hate to be the poor sobs having to drag that thing through the desert from wherever it was quarried.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:33 AM
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Fascinating thread thank you..It will be interesting to see how this information affects the dating for the putative exodus..peace,sugarcookie1 S&F



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


Your welcome. Thank you.


Yeah the Merneptah Stele is a fascinating piece of archaeology as well. Here is some more info on it, for those not familiar with it.

The “Merneptah Stele” is the name given to a stone slab engraved with a description of Merneptah’s military victories in Africa and the Near East. It was discovered by renowned British archaeologist Flinders Petrie at Thebes in 1896.

The Merneptah Stele is significant to biblical archaeologists because it is the earliest extra-biblical reference to the nation of Israel yet to be discovered. The mention of Israel is very short; it simply says, “Israel is laid waste, its seed is not.” Nevertheless, despite its brevity, the reference is very telling. It indicates that at the time the inscription was engraved, the nation of Israel was significant enough to be included by name among the other major city-states which were defeated by Merneptah in the late 13th century B.C. This implies that Israel was a major player in the region during the late 13th century, serving to corroborate to a degree the biblical narrative.
Full Article

The Merneptah Stele, which dates to about 1230 BC, was discovered in Thebes, Egypt in the late 1800’s. The Inscription contains a hymn and a list of the Pharaoh's military victories. The Nation of Israel is on the list of conquests, which scholars believe is the earliest reference to Israel outside the Bible.
edit on 12/20/2012 by mcx1942 because: edit



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 01:35 AM
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This topic and thread has been chosen to be discussed by the ATS LIVE crew this Saturday between 6-9pm pst (9-12 est), as part of this weeks exciting "Turbo Topics" segment.

 

We are running 256kbps through the ATS Player but we now run a 32kbps stream for those of you with slower connections and there are also options to listen via other players on our relay site at Illustrial Website. You can connect to the low bandwidth stream by clicking here.

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For more information and past shows, be sure to check out the ATSLive Show Threads Here.

Hope you'll listen in to the show!
Johnny



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyAnonymous
 


Splendid! Thanks for the interest!

I'm still kind of new but I am becoming a giant fan of ATS Live! You guys and gals rock!



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 


concerning the exodus
there is evidence that the Israelites were slaves of Ramses the Great (Ramses the 2nd)
the bible even mentions Ramses as the Pharoe at the time of the Exodus
at Abu Simbel there is evidence his first born son Amun-her-khepeshef was alive and well when he built the first monument dedicated to Ra-Harakhty (also Re-harakhty), Ptah and Amun
at the second building dedicated to Hathor and his main wife Nefertari there is evidence his first born was dead.
So inbetween the 2 monuments at Abu Simbel is the time his first born died and the time of the Exodus.

at KV5 we have the tomb of the children of Ramses II KV5 Link

Also just East of the Ramesseium is what was called the Sea of Reeds ( now part of the suez canal ), which could of been where the Israelites crossed on foot, and chariots couldnt cross so they got stuck (instead of the parting of the sea)
edit on 20-12-2012 by GezinhoKiko because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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reply to post by mcx1942
 


Well who knew, archeaology scores another point for the Holy Bible.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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why do you think this is unique??

tutankhamuns body was in coffin, which was placed in another, and in another, then put in a box, then a larger one, then another, then another..
and it was all gold!


nice thread though, that family lineage were strong, healthy rulers...during the toughest times, these lot stood out as divine rulers


i do have a question though...
was his mother nefartari?...if so, then he was a nubian
edit on 20-12-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh
why do you think this is unique??

tutankhamuns body was in coffin, which was placed in another, and in another, then put in a box, then a larger one, then another, then another..
and it was all gold!


nice thread though, that family lineage were strong, healthy rulers...during the toughest times, these lot stood out as divine rulers


i do have a question though...
was his mother nefartari?...if so, then he was a nubian
edit on 20-12-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)


MMM, no it was Nefertiti not Nefertiri or Nefertari. His father was Akhenten who tried to make a monotheistic religion based sole on Aten, the priests who were the real power didn't really care for monotheism. Needless to say Akhentaen's reign didn't last very long. Hatshepsut was involved if my memory serves me well, been a while since i delved into egyptology.



posted on Dec, 21 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
[MMM, no it was Nefertiti not Nefertiri or Nefertari. His father was Akhenten who tried to make a monotheistic religion based sole on Aten, the priests who were the real power didn't really care for monotheism. Needless to say Akhentaen's reign didn't last very long. Hatshepsut was involved if my memory serves me well, been a while since i delved into egyptology.


no

im talking about merenptah...who was his mother...nefertari?

nefertiti was akhnatens wife
nefertari was ramsees2 official wife (he had many) ... her children took official roles....which is why i ask

edit on 21-12-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh

Originally posted by lonewolf19792000
[MMM, no it was Nefertiti not Nefertiri or Nefertari. His father was Akhenten who tried to make a monotheistic religion based sole on Aten, the priests who were the real power didn't really care for monotheism. Needless to say Akhentaen's reign didn't last very long. Hatshepsut was involved if my memory serves me well, been a while since i delved into egyptology.


no

im talking about merenptah...who was his mother...nefertari?

nefertiti was akhnatens wife
nefertari was ramsees2 official wife (he had many) ... her children took official roles....which is why i ask

edit on 21-12-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)


Merenptah's mother was Istnofret I.

You might find this interesting:


- First wife Istnofret 2, mother of Seti 2
- Merenptah's second wife was his sister Takhat, and the mother of Amenmesse (Moses)
Amenmesse (Moses) was the product of an incestuous marriage.
The bible also states the same fact in Exodus 6 : 6:20 And Amram (Merenptah) took him Jochebed (Takhat) his father's (Ramses 2) sister to wife; and she bare him Aaron and Moses


Merenptah, Father of Moses

Interesting to see who Amram was, if this is right then the father of Moses was Merenptah. Depends though, Moses was hardly an unpopular name in Egypt back then. Back then Moses would be Messe or Moshe (Meh-shay or Mo-shay).
edit on 21-12-2012 by lonewolf19792000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2012 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


im confused now

i thought moses was found in a casket in the nile by a princess, who brought him up, he lived an elite egytian life

i dont think he was ever king



posted on Dec, 21 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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During the early reign of Ramesses II Isetnofret stood in the shadow of Queen Nefertari. Nefertari had given birth to the heir of the throne and played a dominant role at court.

Isetnofret gave birth to at least four children. Her eldest son Ramesses was named after his father and great-grandfather. Ramesses rose to the rank of Generallisimo in the Egyptian army and after the death of his older half-brother became crown prince of Egypt. Isetnofret’s second son Khaemwaset served in the army for a short time, but he is most famous for the work he did as a priest..

euler.slu.edu...


interesting

he was the successor of the most dynamic building era... of his father and grandather, ramsses and set1
edit on 21-12-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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I just wanted to add a clip from ATS Live where this thread was mentioned in Turbo Topics of the show. I am very proud to be mentioned on the show, even if only in a small part. Still being somewhat of a noob here, I am pretty proud of this and wanted to add the clip from the show to this thread.

Thank you ATS Live for giving this thread a bit of a spotlight. I look forward to trying to create a thread that will one day be discussed during one of the main discussion topics.

Maybe my Ancient Egyptian Stone Vases thread might be discussed on a later show.

If you have not seen my thread on the stone vases, please check it out. Some interesting information in there.

Ok back to the clip, enjoy.


Thank you again ATS Live! Looking forward to many more shows!





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