Down to -50C: Russians freeze to death as strongest-in-decades winter hits

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:09 AM
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rt.com...




Russia is enduring its harshest winter in over 70 years, with temperatures plunging as low as -50 degrees Celsius. Dozens of people have already died, and almost 150 have been hospitalized. The country has not witnessed such a long cold spell since 1938, meteorologists said, with temperatures 10 to 15 degrees lower than the seasonal norm all over Russia. Across the country, 45 people have died due to the cold, and 266 have been taken to hospitals. In total, 542 people were injured due to the freezing temperatures, RIA Novosti reported. The Moscow region saw temperatures of -17 to -18 degrees Celsius on Wednesday, and the record cold temperatures are expected to linger for at least three more days. Thermometers in Siberia touched -50 degrees Celsius, which is also abnormal for December.


If you think you are prep ready, are you ready for that?
This is the kind of cold that can kill power lines and your heat source goes out the _ This is the kind of time I think those of us in northern areas need to prepare for, running a winter in these kind of temps. If we're ready for that, we are ready for anything.
Thought you might want to post any extra smart tidbits you might have for getting ready for these extremes.




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 
My thoughts and prayers go out to my brothers and sisters of Russia....I'll pray for nature to subside it's forces there.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:26 AM
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I grew up in a town that would see -50C winters. My father always had a portable kerosene heater for such an event should we lose power. Those with a wood stove, always keep a cord of wood at hand and also keep lots of blankets, comforters, quilts when all you have left is body heat. Keeping a sleeping bag in the trunk of your car is also a good survival tip for those who travel lonely northern roads.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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Can we get all the folk from that side of the world to all blow at the same time and blow a bit of that our way?. All that hot breath might in turn raise the temp a bit for them, and perhaps here in the UK we wont have to face the prospect of sitting at Christmas lunch in a wet suit and snorkel.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 






If you think you are prep ready, are you ready for that?


Yup,I already planned for that.
An arctic sleeping bag with a bivy sac and a very thick wool blanket for added warmth.
I have used it in minus 35 and was fine....minus 50,I'd still be fine.

Are YOU prepared??



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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We get those types of temperatures in Canada.
Not this year yet, so far only -28.
A couple of years ago, we had those temps in Saskatchewan, and yes, when the snow finally melts in the spring, there's usually a couple of bodies found.
There were two years in a row that were that cold.

Last year was mild, hovered around -30 from what I remember.
Now I'm in Alberta, -26 this morning.

I always thought Russia was normally much colder than Canada.




The Moscow region saw temperatures of -17 to -18 degrees Celsius on Wednesday, and the record cold temperatures are expected to linger for at least three more days.


That's not cold for this time of year, especially for Russia.
I expect those temperatures to remain until spring.
edit on 19-12-2012 by snowspirit because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by Cheerfulnihilist
I grew up in a town that would see -50C winters. My father always had a portable kerosene heater for such an event should we lose power. Those with a wood stove, always keep a cord of wood at hand and also keep lots of blankets, comforters, quilts when all you have left is body heat. Keeping a sleeping bag in the trunk of your car is also a good survival tip for those who travel lonely northern roads.


It's all about being prepared.
I have a box in my back seat of the truck with my snowmobile suit, and extra boots, in case of a winter breakdown.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
We get those types of temperatures in Canada.
Not this year yet, so far only -28.
A couple of years ago, we had those temps in Saskatchewan, and yes, when the snow finally melts in the spring, there's usually a couple of bodies found.
There were two years in a row that were that cold.

Last year was mild, hovered around -30 from what I remember.
Now I'm in Alberta, -26 this morning.

I always thought Russia was normally much colder than Canada.






How cold in Saskatchewan Love this youtube vid

www.youtube.com...

edit on 19-12-2012 by winterkill because: added material



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 


here



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 


double post
edit on 19-12-2012 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
I always thought Russia was normally much colder than Canada.


Not the European part. I remember playing outside when I was a kid, in -42C. But that was for a relatively short period of time and not too far from home.

You mention -28C and that's what most Russians are prepared for. In my experience, -50C is a qualitative difference from -30C. I've never been to outer space, but I suspect it may feel similar to -50C. Again, a typical person in European part of Russia owns and wears cloths that are good down to about -30C, broadly speaking. Even if you layer your clothing, it's damn hard to get insulation good enough for -50C, although of course it's possible with professional gear (which most don't have).

Bottom line, it sucked for me. I had started slipping into a coma after a few hours.

My prayers go to those who have to go through this.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 


Lol, thats about right.
I spent about seven years in Saskatchewan, before moving here to Alberta.

Our well casing caved in one of those -50 years when the ground heaved from the cold. We set up the house with water tanks, and a tank in the back of the truck so we could go pick up good city water, 200 gallons at a time.

In that type of cold, 1/2 hour from town, the water would freeze at the spout, so I had the water hose in the house hooked up to the hot water tap at the washer. I would blast the hot water into the tank in the truck until it could unthaw enough to flow. Sometimes the water from the hose would hit an odd angle and the water would spray up all over me.
The first time that happened, I was surprised to learn that you don't get wet! The water freezes on the outside of your clothes, and you just knock the ice off before going into the house.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
The first time that happened, I was surprised to learn that you don't get wet! The water freezes on the outside of your clothes, and you just knock the ice off before going into the house.


The downside is, if you nose is a little runny, and you for some reason decide to inhale through your nose, it will freeze shut. Not nice!



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by buddhasystem
 


I'm glad you pulled through ok.

Yeah, below -30 your bones in your face start to hurt if they're not covered well. Definitely too cold to play in.
Even most snowmobilers don't like to go out in those temperatures.

It gets dangerous, and people need to be prepared.
I think some of the deaths ( both Canada and Russia) are alcohol related. I think we drink more in the winter, for some reason....
It makes you artificially warmer, and makes people not think properly.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


It makes you artificially warmer, and makes people not think properly.


It dilates the blood vessels in your skin, which your body contracted in the first place, to conserve energy -- even though less circulation means risk of frostbites or limb loss. That's how evolution worked out.

Alcohol will increase circulation and will make you warmer, which sometimes is good, for a short period of time. If you are forced to stay outside for some hours, the end result might be bad, since you'll be "bleeding" much energy from your skin. It all depends.



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 07:24 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
We get those types of temperatures in Canada.
Not this year yet, so far only -28.
A couple of years ago, we had those temps in Saskatchewan, and yes, when the snow finally melts in the spring, there's usually a couple of bodies found.
There were two years in a row that were that cold.

Last year was mild, hovered around -30 from what I remember.
Now I'm in Alberta, -26 this morning.

I always thought Russia was normally much colder than Canada.




The Moscow region saw temperatures of -17 to -18 degrees Celsius on Wednesday, and the record cold temperatures are expected to linger for at least three more days.


That's not cold for this time of year, especially for Russia.
I expect those temperatures to remain until spring.
edit on 19-12-2012 by snowspirit because: (no reason given)


Here in British Columbia, Canada on the coast, we only get those temps when some system is coming down from Alaska. We get the arctic outflow winds.
There was a time around 1989 that we got a severe one that came from Russia. It was minus 70 wind chills. They named it the siberian blast. It was 24 /7 howling winds. Brutal.

I've lived in Saskatchewan as a kid, but it doesn't seem to bother kids as much. Except the time I put my tongue on a car and it got stuck. No idea why I did that, probably because I heard not to and was curious.


As a side note , we got snow today, it's about 0C where I am, inland from Vancouver.


This has me wondering now if this big freeze will come this way, into Alaska, then down the coast.
edit on 19-12-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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NEVER, NEVER, no matter how much a Canadian taunts you for being a coward, EVER stick your tongue on metal in the winter!!!!!



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by winterkill
 







posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by winterkill
NEVER, NEVER, no matter how much a Canadian taunts you for being a coward, EVER stick your tongue on metal in the winter!!!!!


Who needs Canadians when there are Russians


My dad lost the tip of his tongue when he was a young kid, through this schtick (hockey skates! Yum!). Of course I had to try it as well, but managed to keep most of mine.



posted on Dec, 20 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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Grew up in Alaska and was stationed there in the Military. Where I was -50 is not uncommon. Worked on the north slope, experienced even colder temps than -50. As long as you are prepared it's doable.





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