Snake oil gets a high tech upgrade...

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posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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...and it is still way too expensive.

I found this website and was flabbergasted at the prices on what is basically a medical quackery device.

BCX ULTRA™ RIFE MACHINE

The Rife machine and several other equally ridiculous devices are being sold for outrageous prices.

While there just might be some small benefit from this device, the seller is making outlandish claims that it can pretty much cure everything imaginable.
edit on 19-12-2012 by happykat39 because: added info




posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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But it is backed by over 80 years of research!! Not to mention it is ON SALE!!! $2,700 isn't too bad for hopes and dreams.....



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


It is funny. But if I had cash to waste I'd probably buy one just for the fun of it. Quantum physics/mechanics proves reality is but frequencies in a sense right? So why wouldn't a machine like that work? A machine like that...not that one



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:37 AM
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I'm surprised more of these schemes aren't prosecuted. Seems like a good money maker for the feds if you ask me, and they'd be doing something constructive instead of sitting by idly while gullible grandmas get bilked out of their fixed-incomes:

Q-Ray makers ordered to pay $16M in refunds to consumers


'Defendants might as well have said: Beneficent creatures from the 17th dimension use this bracelet as a beacon to locate people who need pain relief, and whisk them off to their home world every night to provide help in ways unknown to our science.'


www.cbc.ca...

Sadly, I have family members dumb enough that they bought the bracelets. I will be hesitant to show them this one, even as a warning I feel they might be 'rife' with stupidity again. (Warning turning into unintended advertising.)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by boncho
I'm surprised more of these schemes aren't prosecuted. Seems like a good money maker for the feds if you ask me, and they'd be doing something constructive instead of sitting by idly while gullible grandmas get bilked out of their fixed-incomes:

Q-Ray makers ordered to pay $16M in refunds to consumers


'Defendants might as well have said: Beneficent creatures from the 17th dimension use this bracelet as a beacon to locate people who need pain relief, and whisk them off to their home world every night to provide help in ways unknown to our science.'


www.cbc.ca...

Sadly, I have family members dumb enough that they bought the bracelets. I will be hesitant to show them this one, even as a warning I feel they might be 'rife' with stupidity again. (Warning turning into unintended advertising.)


Trouble is although it may not actually 'work' some people might find improvement to ailments due to the placebo effect
edit on 19-12-2012 by CrimsonMoon because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by CrimsonMoon


Trouble is although it may not actually 'work' some people might find improvement to ailments due to the placebo effect

 


That's true, but they may also lie to themselves and others once the placebo effect wears off or fades. This being different in that they would consciously make the choice as opposed to the subconscious effect of placebo. This behaviour being implemented because of fear of embarrassment, going back on their word, etc.

In any case, sugar pills are far cheaper and accomplish the same thing. I often wonder if a regulated sugar pill industry should be developed without consumers being privy, but reducing cost and dangers associated with quack products.

edit on 19-12-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)





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