Standing water on Mars in PIA16550

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posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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But I will say that the surface shown in the pic NEEDS lake so that I will have the opportunity to skip some rocks if I'm an astronaut. Look at how many rocks there're! Perfect for skipping.

But seriously, it still looks very much like earth. The fact that they're both rocky planets is apparent, yes. Some NASA pictures have the red worked out of them too and they're remarkably earth-like.

Wouldn't it be weird to be on a planet that has a river and contemplating the fact that earht is some 30-60 light years away? I wonder if that day will come in the next 30,000 years? Or ever?

They've found an exo-planet that might have an ocean:
www.cosmosmagazine.com - First "serious candidate" for ocean planet...
edit on 18-12-2012 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:21 PM
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Seems like there are more of these pools.

Pools on Mars

And there are also some odd shaped rocks around these pools.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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Mmmmm i know i am just seeing symmetry and making my own natural comparisons, but its a beautiful shape that i have only ever seen in nature as a seashell.

I digress....shells don't have legs.
edit on 18-12-2012 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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The shadows of the rocks on the smooth fine sand does create an interesting optical illusion at first glance. Not water, though.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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cdn.c.photoshelter.com...

farm2.static.flickr.com...

www.sonoloco.com...

farm8.staticflickr.com...

l.rgbimg.com...
erosion lake



Water eroded rocks. Water showing up in the one clear picture, and the other ones showing damp dirt and silt from a creek.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Another pool of water...maybe muddy water from Sol106 Mastcam camera.



Link to larger image

But if you look close enought...it is not water. But a pool of finely grained martian dust among the rocks.
edit on 18-12-2012 by 0pass because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Yep. and that looks nothing like the picture from Mars.

Note the high reflectivity of the water's surface (and the disturbance ripples on that surface too).



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:51 PM
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Beautiful pics.....still if you go in and play with the color on those pics and push it towards a more Martian surface look you can still tell what it and isn't water.
edit on 18-12-2012 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 12:56 PM
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Not that size does have anything to do with it - water is water IF it's water.


image with 10cms ruler

3 views from left mastcam (as opposed to the right one in the original post)
image 1
image 2
image 3



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 

And where exactly is this water?? All i see is dry sand in that photo. And it is no secret that mars has plenty of water but it is currently mostly hidden underneath the surface or as ice in polar regions.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by LordDrakula
 

Those are shadows caused by sun and not reflections. How the hell can you mistake shadows for reflection?



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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Originally posted by qmantoo
Not that size does have anything to do with it - water is water IF it's water.


image with 10cms ruler

3 views from left mastcam (as opposed to the right one in the original post)
image 1
image 2
image 3


the original pictures do not show any sign of water. Only when you auto-adjust the colors the illusion of water shows up.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:12 PM
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Not seeing any water in that pic, but I see why you would think so.

What strikes me in the rock layers. Very thin like a sedementary rock. I think those layers were formed in water at some point in time.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by resoe26
and if there was water on mars...... then what?
Would it be the best discovery in human history?
Do you believe we would somehow be living on Mars soon?

Personally I don't even know why we are exploring Mars when we still haven't even explored 90% of our oceans here on earth.

(it's like "skip the ocean man, what's on that desert planet mars!? ALIENS!?")

Our oceans sure is going to help the day when we are killed off by an astroid, comet or supervolcano.... It is not a question of if but instead when.. Having a human colony on another planet or moon would help our survival.
Also this planet is getting overcrowded so that research might come in handy sometime in the future.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


I think it's just dust, look at this,



The dust at the left looks the same as the ''water puddle'' on the right. The dust on the left can't be water because it can't stand up like that. See what I mean?
edit on 18-12-2012 by Jauk3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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I dont see it.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by Max_TO
Would liquid water not simply boil off if exposed , assuming the temp was even high enough to allow water to exist on the surface of Mars ?


The surface can get hot enough as you can get up to 20c during summer in equator regions. But like you said it would just boil off due to the low atmospheric pressure. The only way liquid water can exist is in brine substance, in caves or underneath the ground.



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
Anonymity is a wonderful thing, otherwise lying and pretending you can't see an obvious thing, wouldn't look good on many careers. A doctor for example who can't see something would not be considered competent, same with any kind of scientist, etc.

Most people have good enough eyesight to see that it is SAND and not water. How the hell could the dark patches of sand even be water when they are at different heights?? I guess water on Mars does not follow the laws of physics?



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:28 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 




There will always be shadows, but what we need is a different view of this particular rock area which shows that it is indeed fine sand. (or water)

All you had to do was look at the page I linked. The rock in the middle of the wide angle view:

They are shadows. All of them.
edit on 12/18/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99


Plain as the nose on your face!


(gimp---cartoon affect with writing)

Come on ATS, pay attention and ensure that NASA and the mismanagers are not off the hook.
edit on 18-12-2012 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)

And this proves my previous post.. that you seem to think that water does not follow the laws of physics. It does not even look remotely like water.





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