Dangerous Gas may be cause of super-charged weather, mass die-offs, quakes and more

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posted on Jan, 2 2013 @ 05:11 PM
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Naked guy brandishes sword in coastal San Jose (California):

Naked guy brandishes sword

Naked guy attacks dog then man, in coastal Miami (Florida):

Naked guy attacks dog and man

Both coastal areas. The Miami one was close to the original face-eater incident too.

jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com...

edit on 2-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 07:29 AM
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This is a great thread to watch. Around 300 birds just fall from the sky and die in eastern Tennessee. Evidently, they are trying to come out and say this one was a flock of birds getting hit by a car. That's one of the most laughable explanations I have heard yet. Even though most of the birds were spread out into a field, these birds just got plowed into by a car. Unbelievable!

Mass bird deaths in TN



posted on Jan, 3 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by Rezlooper
This is a great thread to watch. Around 300 birds just fall from the sky and die in eastern Tennessee. Evidently, they are trying to come out and say this one was a flock of birds getting hit by a car. That's one of the most laughable explanations I have heard yet. Even though most of the birds were spread out into a field, these birds just got plowed into by a car. Unbelievable!

Mass bird deaths in TN



Yeah, the excuses are kinda pitiful. Teenagers and bottle rockets? LMAO! I'd like to see some teenagers with bottle rockets even hit ONE bird in flight, much less take down a flock by the time the lady who saw the flock alive had turned around and saw them dead.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 12:11 PM
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40 methane leaks found on the ocean floor of the East Coast of U.S. These plumes were visualized using sound waves as they rose towards the surface, but the story below says its unlikely the methane will reach the surface.


It's unclear exactly where the gas is coming from, Ruppel said. Methane either can arise from microbial activity in shallow deposits of organic material, or it can come from more deep-seated processes involving oil formation. Probably both processes are at work in these different seeps, she said.


Story says that prior to the 1980's these leaks were unheard of off the East Coast, but since 1980's a few have been found.

40 seafloor methane leaks found



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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More and more methane released from many sources but I find it most interesting that methane sort of leveled off from the late 90's until 2007 where it began increasing again and rapidly about the same time that hydrolic fracking took off. Methane rose 150% over the last couple of hundred years from levels that had sustained for 400,000 years but then sort of leveled off until 2007. There are many causes to the methane release over the years which include livestock, rice cultivation, landfill out-gassing, oil and gas extraction and coal mining. We also have as I posted above natural methane leaks in the oceans and we have permafrost that melts and releases the trapped gases. But of great concern is the fracking. Like I said, methane levels began rising again right around the same time that fracking took off. Sure, we have plunging winter heating bills but at what cost? Also, it was said that natural gas would be better for the atmosphere as there would be less emissions than from coal, but check out this article that makes a different claim.

9% of gas collected at Utah field escaping into atmosphere


US scientists have once again warned large amounts of methane could be leaking from new onshore gas drilling projects, challenging claims the fuel can offer a lower emissions alternative to coal. Around nine per cent of the potent greenhouse gas methane produced by a gas field in Utah was shown to be escaping into the atmosphere It follows a study published by the same scientists in February last year suggesting up to four per cent losses of methane at a field near Denver. The US has seen energy prices tumble as a surge in onshore shale gas production has allowed energy generators to switch from coal to gas. The gas industry has argued that the move has helped to cut US greenhouse gas emissions, as gas is significantly less carbon intensive than coal. But while research published in April by campaign group Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and Princeton University suggested shifting to natural gas would have immediate climate benefits - especially if replacing old coal plants - these would only be realized if the cumulative methane leakage rate from shale gas projects is below 3.2 per cent.


Here are a couple more links about a study that finds alarmingly high rates of methane leakage from fracking.

Study Raises Concerns About Methane Release from Natural Gas Fracking Sites

Alarminlgy high emissions from natural gas extraction


“We were expecting to see high methane levels, but I don’t think anybody really comprehended the true magnitude of what we would see,” says Colm Sweeney, who led the aerial component of the study as head of the aircraft program at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder. Jeff Tollefson explains in Nature that the percentage of methane leaked is key to determining whether switching to natural gas from coal-fired generators has a climate benefit; it must be less than 3.2% for that to be the case, he writes. The Obama administration has embraced fracking as part of its “all-of-the-above” energy strategy.



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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I think the fracking is actually a mitigation effort. There was no fracking involved when those 4,000 square miles of methane hydrates began melting off the US East Coast. It looks to me like all that gas is going to come out, period, even if we're not involved at all. The question is, do we take it out ourselves and use it for energy or otherwise bottle it up somewhere, or does it go straight into the atmosphere and heat up the planet, exacerbating the hydrogen sulfide problem and destroying human civilization with huge fires and explosions. Honestly, it looks too late for the surface of the Earth to me already, BUT the more we can contain the damage, the quicker people might be able to live on the surface again at some distant point in the future. Like, instead of it taking 5 million years, maybe we're cutting that down to 1 million years by dealing with at least SOME of the gas/oil ourselves. Or maybe if we can bio-engineer some stuff, we could reduce that time to thousands of years or something.

So, normally I'd be against fracking. But seeing as it doesn't look like we have a lot of choice at this point - the gas is coming out regardless - I guess I'm for it. Worth a try anyway. And hey, 9% going into the atmosphere now is better than 100% going into the atmosphere later. We're just kinda small compared to the problem, and we have virtually no infrastructure in place NOW to deal with the oceanic methane deposits, so the land deposits are all we can really do much about. And this isn't something where you can wait and see if the gas starts gushing out. Some of the deposits are below big cities. They'd be incinerated. Too late to do anything then. So 'they' have to assume that any gas in any deposit IS going to come out, and do something about it NOW. Looking around at the world today, I'd make that assumption too, especially if I lived above or near any big gas deposits.

I'm a 'green' guy myself. This all grates on me too. And fracking is nothing compared to the crazy stuff we may have to try as our situation continues to deteriorate. Nuking the methane hydrates on the ocean floors, along the coasts of the northern hemisphere? I bet someone is looking at that possibility or they already have, as a desperation tactic.
edit on 5-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


So how do we bottle it? How do we contain it? I know burning methane would allow it to enter the atmosphere as carbon dioxide, which is a much better alternative. Is this a possibility or not? I know you've said that you think it may be too late already...it seems we just allow these chain reactions to fuel the chain reaction.

I believe your right that it's too late to do anything about fracking. It's created a heck of a lot of jobs, saved a lot of money for folks on gas bills which is a good thing when the economy is down and people need that extra help and the future of natural gas looks very bright for America. We're the world's #1 producer and only a few countries are using right now but that's about to change and several American companies are currently working on transporting it oversees. Obama holds several applications on his desk right now to blow this industry up and that means big bucks for America. But, that's also scary to think that hydrolic fracking is still only in its beginning stages if this is going to contribute a heck of a lot more to the methane release.

Here's some info on the process of fracking - but first a couple of points...they go thousands of feet deeper than usual natural gas wells...they use multiple chemicals in their cocktail...the chemical cocktail mixed with water and sand hits the shale in a high pressure explosion that blasts the methane out.

The methane is captured but as the article in my previous post points out, in two different studies 4% in Denver and 9% in Utah, is escaping into the atmosphere. This is just two fields studied. It's said that for methane gas to be better than coal emissions it has to be less than 3.2% that escapes.

Fracking: The Process
Fracking - also called hydro-fracking or, officially, horizontal drilling coupled with multi-stage hydraulic fracturing - is a relatively new process of natural gas extraction. Here's a step-by-step look:

A well is drilled vertically to the desired depth, then turns ninety degrees and continues horizontally for several thousand feet into the shale believed to contain the trapped natural gas.

A mix of water, sand, and various chemicals is pumped into the well at high pressure in order to create fissures in the shale through which the gas can escape.

Natural gas escapes through the fissures and is drawn back up the well to the surface, where it is processed, refined, and shipped to market.

Wastewater (also called "flowback water" or "produced water") returns to the surface after the fracking process is completed. In Michigan, this water is contained in steel tanks until it can be stored long-term by deep injection in oil and gas waste wells.

Fracking is fundamentally different than traditional gas extraction methods.

Fracking wells go thousands of feet deeper than traditional natural gas wells.

Fracking requires between two and five million gallons of local freshwater per well - up to 100 times more than traditional extraction methods.

Fracking utilizes "fracking fluid," a mix of water, sand, and a cocktail of toxic chemicals. While companies performing fracking have resisted disclosure of the exact contents of the fracking fluid by claiming that this information is proprietary, studies of fracking waste indicate that the fluid contains: formaldehyde, acetic acids, citric acids, and boric acids, among hundreds of other chemical contaminants.

Source



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Oh, I know, fracking is some gnarly stuff. But what if they already KNOW that the surface of the Earth will soon be uninhabitable? And the oceans and land will die off hard, little life left, etc. So, it doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things if there are some toxic chemicals around, or if radiation from Fukushima floats around, or if we nuke the crap out of the oceans. (And I have no clue if that'd actually work, but it would be better if that stuff came out as CO2 instead of as methane.) In other words, they may really only be looking at what's best in the very long-term, because they already KNOW that our options are off-planet or underground, for a very, very long time. So, get as much gas out as possible, burn it up, use the energy for productive things, don't worry too much about the environment because the hydrogen sulfide problem is going to exterminate mostly everything anyway. And by the time we can live on the surface again, the chemicals and radiation and such will be gone, along with the hydrogen sulfide and the methane too.

That's why they don't care much about Fukushima. It doesn't really matter. Same with hazardous chemicals. We're going to have a planetary atmosphere filled with clouds of hydrogen sulfide, which is an extremely flammable gas-chamber-quality gas. We couldn't possibly do anything that could compare with that, even if we were fully committed to polluting the planet as much as we could.

That's why I think this is it for life on the surface: 'they' are ALREADY acting like it is. Ignoring Fukushima. The underground bunkers. The mass fatality legislation. Yada yada. This same ol' ancient extinction event is upon us, and they know it. We aren't going to be here on the surface for much longer. So little things like environmental pollution just don't matter, at least in the long run. If you're gonna have to wear HazMat suits on the surface, with positive air pressure connected to a known good air supply (necessary for hydrogen sulfide), then that'll keep you safe from the other stuff too. Otherwise, get below ground or off-planet. I'm sure they'll scavenge what they can before everything burns up or corrodes though. The stores of preppers will probably provide lots of useful stuff for the survivors once the gas has killed people on the surface.

In the meantime, they're just buying us what time they can. I don't think human beings created this problem, by the way. We probably - in the long run - made things better, by burning up a lot of the gas and oil and coal slowly, over an extended period of time. This has happened before without us. We'd be overly arrogant and egocentric to think we're the cause this time.

I do still believe more people could survive if we faced reality and committed ourselves 100% to creating more/better Plan B facilities. Of course, a lot of people will go nuts when they realize what's happening too, and that won't be fun. But I feel like we're fiddling while Rome burns.
edit on 5-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


Not quite the answer I was looking for

Basically, we're all screwed! So, I know you've thrown out a lot of suggestions here for the future and for people, but in reality, what do you think the average Joe can do to survive?



posted on Jan, 5 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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Originally posted by Rezlooper
reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


Not quite the answer I was looking for

Basically, we're all screwed! So, I know you've thrown out a lot of suggestions here for the future and for people, but in reality, what do you think the average Joe can do to survive?


Rich people can dig in underground in the Himalayas. Normal folks, best we can do is wake others up, wake everyone up, so that we can work together, hopefully get some informational aid. The government could be helpful if they weren't hiding this. THEY could try bigger things without worry of us 'catching on', if we already know. They could show us what to build, help us reorganize human civilization around maximum survival, give us forecasting so we know when what gases are blowing where and the risks we face each day.

Short of that, we can try time-buying things at the personal level. Ozone generators. Insulate homes. Indoor plants. Maybe build some shipping container homes underground, connect to solar panels (but watch the copper and rusted iron problem). Get hydrogen sulfide detectors, HazMat suits, extra oxgyen tanks and compressors, batteries, food, water, vitamins, yada yada. Adjust to not going outside and not using combustion engines of any kind. Not easy!

Seems easier to wake everyone up and face the problems together, work on bigger scales, build bigger things, make use of factories and economy of scale and all that, while we still can. Get on a wartime footing. Not a war against humans but a war FOR humans. Yes, that'd involve sacrifice. They might tell me I have to leave my home because they're going to bulldoze this area to make it easier to protect a different area from the fires and explosions. Well, alrighty then. (But...booo! Heh.) We'd have to be adaptable, adjust to a fluid non-conventional situation. Maybe they don't think people can handle that and that it's better to just placate us and tell us everything's okay until we're dead. To which I would reply: do we not even deserve a CHANCE to make sacrifices and work together for our mutual survival? Continuity of GOVERNMENT seems to be something they understand. Well, how about continuity of PEOPLE?
edit on 5-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


Thanks for the info Johnny. I'm sure I'll be asking more about this in the future.

I started a new thread about a mysterious explosion in Ohio that leveled a home. Not gas leak and not a meth lab, but it was felt and heard miles away and some mistook as an earthquake. Check it out.

Another unexplained explosion levels home in Ohio



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 12:26 PM
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Is there a Santa after all?

Maybe we should all start planting Christmas trees, but just how many would it take?

Christmas Trees eat methane



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 12:37 PM
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$200,000 approved to monitor the Salton Sea in California for hydrogen sulfide release


Air quality officials on Friday approved spending $200,000 on long-term monitoring of odors from the Salton Sea, a response to last fall’s foul stench that spread 150 miles from the lake and triggered hundreds of citizen calls to 911. On Sept. 9, hydrogen sulfide from the lake bed was stirred up by a monsoonal thunderstorm. Wind swept across the desert and the Inland area, carrying with it a rotten egg smell that spread all the way to the San Fernando Valley. It was two days before air regulators confirmed the source.


Officials expect that this 376 square mile lake is going to release more and more hydrogen sulfide.

Source



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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Originally posted by Rezlooper
$200,000 approved to monitor the Salton Sea in California for hydrogen sulfide release


Air quality officials on Friday approved spending $200,000 on long-term monitoring of odors from the Salton Sea, a response to last fall’s foul stench that spread 150 miles from the lake and triggered hundreds of citizen calls to 911. On Sept. 9, hydrogen sulfide from the lake bed was stirred up by a monsoonal thunderstorm. Wind swept across the desert and the Inland area, carrying with it a rotten egg smell that spread all the way to the San Fernando Valley. It was two days before air regulators confirmed the source.


Officials expect that this 376 square mile lake is going to release more and more hydrogen sulfide.

Source


Hah, yeah, it sure is. You don't wanna be living anywhere near that place. If that were the ONLY problem body of water, we could handle that. But it's not. The oceans are the bigger problem. Lake Erie probably isn't doing too well either. And the Gulf of Mexico certainly isn't doing well.

Update done for yesterday's events. All kindsa stuff! 22 buses burned up in Fresno, boats exploded and burned at marina in Pennsylvania, boat burst into flame in the Gulf of Mexico, 15 vehicles hit by fire at auto shop in Michigan, shark babies washing ashore dead in Fiji, 3 people dead and 3 unconscious at home in India, more peoples' charred corpses found, etc. TS is starting to seriously HTF now, looks like, to me anyway. I guess some people would call all of this 'normal'. But then, some people are crazy too. Heh.

jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com...
edit on 7-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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Here's another indicator of MISA Theory being correct: Campi Flegrei caldera rising. Look on a map, see where that volcano is. It's right on the coast, on an archipelago in Italy, which is itself a peninsula nation surrounded by water. As the land-based ice on Earth melts, all that water weight is flowing to the oceans and seas and that weight is pushing down, squeezing and crunching faults and volcanoes right where the crust of the Earth is thinnest. If you look at the last 3 years of volcanic eruptions, you'll see just how many are near coasts, or even underwater. There are 3 million volcanoes on Earth. Let's say we've heard of 100 land-based volcanoes erupting. That means there simply has to be a ton of oceanic volcanoes erupting now, and either we simply aren't aware of them, or we're not being told. MOST volcanoes are in the oceans. And as they erupt, that's hot magma flowing upwards toward the surface, heating up the waters, which melts the methane hydrates, promotes anoxia and grows the hydrogen sulfide problem.

Quote: "However, in addition to the detected ground deformation, scientists also measured increased numbers of micro earthquakes, a rise in temperature and in particular, an increase in the proportion of the gases of magmatic origin at fumaroles in the Solfatara crater. As the hydrothermal system is closely connected with the underlying complex magma chamber of the Phlegrean Fields, new magma movements could in fact be the culprit for the observed changes."

So, I see a possibility of a double-whammy: the volcanoes continue to go berserk, escalate, and we get a huge eruption, one of those planet-changing VS8s. The world is plunged into incredible cold, the Sun blotted out, and the lands freeze over hard. But at the same time the OCEANS stay warm, from all the magma and volcanic eruptions, and we see increasing amounts of methane and hydrogen sulfide coming from them. Then, after we've frozen to death from volcanic winter for a few decades, while everything burns and is poisoned by the gases, THEN the cooling volcanic gases fade from the atmosphere and all that methane kicks in and then we BROIL. (If anyone is still alive by then.)

That really looks like a possibility. Maybe that's how it happened before too.



posted on Jan, 7 2013 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


Checking out your site Johnny on today's updates I came across this one about the three people injured in an explosion on their cabin cruiser out in the Gulf of Mexico. I thought this one was interesting because it was in the same place that thousands of mullet washed ashore last week off Sarasota County beaches. They said that Red Tide was the cause of the fish die-off and that red tide was on the rise in the area.

Three injured when fire breaks out on boat

Red Tide kills thousands of fish



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 05:16 AM
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Originally posted by Rezlooper
reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


Checking out your site Johnny on today's updates I came across this one about the three people injured in an explosion on their cabin cruiser out in the Gulf of Mexico. I thought this one was interesting because it was in the same place that thousands of mullet washed ashore last week off Sarasota County beaches. They said that Red Tide was the cause of the fish die-off and that red tide was on the rise in the area.

Three injured when fire breaks out on boat

Red Tide kills thousands of fish


Good detective work there! I hadn't even noticed that. It sure helps to have more than one person looking at things!

Oh, forgot to mention one thing I'm trying, health-wise: melatonin. It's a powerful anti-oxidant, which is good regardless of anything else. But read that Wiki link, see the other things it does, decide for yourself whether you want to be taking it. It helps prevent DNA damage, for one thing, and I'm sure that fierce bright white Sun isn't doing our DNA any good. It also has anti-aging properties and may help the immune system. It definitely helps you sleep deeper. 'Blue' light suppresses normal melatonin production too (as opposed to 'yellow' light). That white Sun looks bluer to me than the old yellow Sun, so our own bodies may not be producing as much melatonin as they used to, which could have some bad effects, like sleeplessness and insomnia and immune system problems.

WHERE I got the idea to take it at all is what's interesting. There was a crop circle, one of the ones that look real, not kids with boards, which had the chemical drawing of melatonin. Apparently 'someone' may know about the hydrogen sulfide problem, the UV problem, etc, and whoever made that crop circle was trying to help us with information. So, I started taking it. It hasn't hurt me in any way. I take it right before bedtime and I sleep better. If it's helping my DNA and immune system too, even better. I haven't gotten sick since I started taking it, but obviously that could just be luck or coincidence. I am merely providing information here. It's your body and health, so you decide for yourself. Read the Wiki link for more info. It is over-the-counter, at least in the States, basically treated as a dietary supplement or sleep aid.

Look at this link:

Flu getting bad in the Lehigh Valley (Pennsylvania)

'Flu-like' illness is kicking peoples' azzes all across the country, maybe the world. Hydrogen sulfide causes 'flu-like' symptoms. But this could also be our own immune systems breaking down and making us more vulnerable, due to lack of melatonin, caused by too much 'blue' light from the Sun as the ozone layer dissolves and the methane in the upper atmosphere increases. So bugs that might not normally do much damage might just hurt us pretty bad now. Hydrogen sulfide also harms the immune system directly too, being a broad-spectrum poison. Either way, looks like our immune systems are being compromised, and we're paying a price.

edit on 8-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


I'm going to look into this stuff, although I'm not real big on taking anything, I've been having some restless nights and I'm battling a slight cold right now.

I've noticed that the flu outbreak is the worst in many years and also pneumonia is much worse this year. There are many other bugs floating around all over the world this year. Here are a few examples and this is just recent threads here at ATS over the past month.

Flu infections sweeping America

Pneumonia, how many cases are normal

Epidemic alert in Africa, new disease

Flu propaganda started in Toronto

Bird Flu kills 160 in Indonesia

Massive Norovirus outbreak

Swine Flu in West Bank

Drug resistant deadly bacteria spreads to 42 states



posted on Jan, 8 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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Wow, here's a helluva story:

Ambulance driver dies while transporting fire victim

So this man finds his wife ON FIRE in their living room. She dies. That was probably hydrogen sulfide in her clothes and she got too close to a fireplace or she was a smoker or something. So an ambulance comes, gets the husband, heads to the hospital. Then the ambulance driver loses consciousness and crashes and dies too. That was probably from hydrogen sulfide in the husband's clothes, or the driver was exposed at the house when he picked up the husband, or both.

That made me remember another story, from June, where a homeless guy came into a hospital covered with 'an unknown chemical', which sickened several employees and caused the hospital to evacuate:

Homeless guy sickens hospital employees

That was mentioned in the 2012-06-19 update, back in June. So in June it was already getting into the clothes of homeless people who sleep outside fully exposed. Now it's getting inside peoples' homes in concentrations high enough to ignite people and possibly to cause secondary sickening in people who come close to the people exposed inside their homes too. And think of the poor husband, jeez: he sees his wife burn to death then on the way to the hospital his ambulance driver sickens, crashes and dies too. Gotta wonder how long he's gonna live himself, assuming he ever made it to the hospital.

Gettin' purty scary out there! I think I'm gonna go give one of my ozone generators a hug...

jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com...
edit on 8-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


This story of the ambulance driver getting sick after coming to call about woman on fire is one of the best evidence stories yet for the gas theory. Great find! I wonder what the 'official conclusion' will be on this one.






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