SOLAR WATCH: Sun Comes Alive - Monster Sunspot Region Emerging From the Southeastern Limb!

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posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Bakatono
 


They would all melt down uncontrollably. Every single last one. Without the electricity to pump water to cool them or drop in control rods or whatever they would all go critical pretty quickly. It would be the end of us all

Some would, if they run out of fuel for their emergency generators. But there are reactors which use the heat from the core to drive pumps.


The inherently safe reactors, those that don't need outside power to avoid a meltdown, are vastly in the minority worldwide. If we have an event, either from the sun or from an EMP bombing, that takes out the power in any country that has a large number of reactors it won't matter where they are.

Consider that just the four reactors and their spent fuel pools at Fukushima Daichi contain enough fuel that if it all melted down and caught fire it would make the northern hemisphere and much of the southern hemisphere uninhabitable for two to three hundred years or more.

What do you think it would do to the earth if a country or region with 20 or more reactors that would melt down in such a power failure event got hit? It wouldn't make any difference where they were you could stick a fork in the entire planet because it would be done, well done at that. And it wouldn't make any difference how many inherently safe reactors they had alongside the ones that melted down.




posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by happykat39

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Bakatono
 


They would all melt down uncontrollably. Every single last one. Without the electricity to pump water to cool them or drop in control rods or whatever they would all go critical pretty quickly. It would be the end of us all

Some would, if they run out of fuel for their emergency generators. But there are reactors which use the heat from the core to drive pumps.


The inherently safe reactors, those that don't need outside power to avoid a meltdown, are vastly in the minority worldwide. If we have an event, either from the sun or from an EMP bombing, that takes out the power in any country that has a large number of reactors it won't matter where they are.

Consider that just the four reactors and their spent fuel pools at Fukushima Daichi contain enough fuel that if it all melted down and caught fire it would make the northern hemisphere and much of the southern hemisphere uninhabitable for two to three hundred years or more.

What do you think it would do to the earth if a country or region with 20 or more reactors that would melt down in such a power failure event got hit? It wouldn't make any difference where they were you could stick a fork in the entire planet because it would be done, well done at that. And it wouldn't make any difference how many inherently safe reactors they had alongside the ones that melted down.

Yup you hit the nail on the head - that is how the world as we know it will end.... but not 12/21/12 just saying



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 

I know that in the US reactors are required to be able to shutdown in an emergency. I presume this would mean having enough fuel (if required) for emergency generators. This does leave the problem of dealing with spent fuel storage. The NRC submitted a petition last year which requested that this situation be addressed.

The petitioner requests that the NRC amend its regulations in 10 CFR Part 50 to require licensees to provide reliable emergency systems to assure long-term cooling and water makeup for spent fuel pools using only onsite power sources. Specifically, the petitioner proposes
amending 10 CFR Part 50 to require that the emergency systems be able to operate for a period of 2 years without human operator intervention and without offsite fuel resupply and that backup power systems for spent fuel pools be electrically isolated from other plant electrical systems during normal and emergency operation.

www.gpo.gov...

As of yet there doesn't seem to be much action on the PRM but at least it's under consideration.

Can't do much about what other nations do and I don't know about their regulation and mitigation strategies but I'm not sure they are as vulnerable as the US is with its extensive, integrated power grid system.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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so whats the verdict??? do i start tunneling now???



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Was just glancing over the post than noticed... Phage posting? Now that makes me scared as #ing # holy # #!!!!!!!



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by lightmeup04
 

What makes you think the Sun is interacting with anything?


The Phton Belt is something that would cause it to change.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by Sagitaris
 

There is no photon belt. Photons are massless particles which travel at the speed of light. They are light.
edit on 12/16/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Sagitaris
 

There is no photon belt. Photons are massless particles which travel at the speed of light. They are light.
edit on 12/16/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Using Voyegar1's data I disagree with your statement Proof

NOTE: Voyagar 1 and 2 are infront of the course that our solar system is heading so this will interact with Sun, planets, gas giants, comets, and humans.
edit on 16-12-2012 by Sagitaris because: (no reason given)


light alters reality light manipulation
edit on 16-12-2012 by Sagitaris because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by Sagitaris
 

Proof of what? That the magnetic field of the Sun forms connections with interstellar magnetic fields? OK, fine with me. It's similar to the way Earth's magnetic field forms connections to the Sun's.

Where's the "photon belt" come into it?

Note: This has been happening for a very, very long time.
edit on 12/16/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by ManjushriPrajna

Originally posted by GhostyMew
reply to post by Evildead
 


You can't actually be serious.

brb calling child protective services. you seem mentally unstable


He may be overreacting a bit, but it's better to be safe than sorry, especially when he has a son. The fact that you're implying CPS should be called on a father who's genuinely worried about his son's life bothers me greatly. I'm assuming you don't have a son or daughter, otherwise you'd be a little more understanding.


Well said

Sadly these SNITCHES are often the cause of famillies being broken up.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


ok, thats the thing cause we are just seeing this magnetic highway NOW. If its connected to the sun why haven't we seen this stream CONNECTING with the sun. why is it flowing just beyond out solar system. Its plausible and probable that we would drift into a energy cloud as we rotate around the Milky Way. So lets play the what if game.

If there was a cloud of massless photons consuming the space we drift in what would its affect be on the Sun?



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Sagitaris
 


If its connected to the sun why haven't we seen this stream CONNECTING with the sun. why is it flowing just beyond out solar system.
Because it isn't connecting with the Sun. It's connecting with the magnetic field of the Sun which is carried by the particles of the solar wind to the edge of the heliosphere, far, far from the Sun. That is where the connection occurs.


If there was a cloud of massless photons consuming the space we drift in what would its affect be on the Sun?
Photons cannot exist as a cloud. They are electromagnetic radiation. They are traveling at the speed of light through the universe. There are clouds of interstellar matter though and we are passing through one now and have been for thousands of years. What effect does it have on the Sun? Probably none, it is much less dense than the solar wind, it doesn't reach the Sun.
edit on 12/16/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:45 PM
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well i hope its pointing to the east coast usa, its starting to snow 8o(



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Brilliant just as earth has a magnetosphere so does the sun. i see now




"The heliosphere is essentially the balance between outward-moving solar wind and the compression from the gas and dust that surround it, so if you're in a different interstellar medium environment, you're going to create a different heliospheric structure," said astronomer Seth Redfield with Wesleyan University


As for the interstellar cloud. I understand now that we have been in this cloud, and that these clouds have an affect on the heliosphere squishing it like a beach ball, instead of previously thought as a bullet which means the cloud has some resistance. These clouds also have an affect on the earth.



"As the sun moves through space and moves in and out of interstellar clouds, the flux of galactic cosmic rays at the Earth really changes. Someday maybe we'll be able to link the sun's motion through interstellar clouds with the geologic history of Earth. I think that would be really exciting," added University of Chicago senior scientist Priscilla Frisch.


Source



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by k21968
I always feel so much better when Phage shows up and posts. He removes the panic in an instant and states the facts and moves on. Much like Superman.


That being said I would like Phage to tell us what his number 1 worry is in all the universe that could affect us?



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by Sagitaris
 

It is not the interstellar particles which have an effect. The varying density of the interstellar medium causes the heliosphere to expand and contract. The more contracted it becomes the deeper into the solar system cosmic rays can penetrate and vice versa. It is the effect of the cosmic rays on Earth's history which is of interest. There are ideas about how climate can be affected. Theories about how evolution may have been affected.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by jlafleur02
 

All of us? A very large comet or asteroid impact.
Though probably less likely (but just as unpredictable) than a severe geomagnetic event, the effects would be worse.
edit on 12/16/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by happykat39
 

I know that in the US reactors are required to be able to shutdown in an emergency. I presume this would mean having enough fuel (if required) for emergency generators. This does leave the problem of dealing with spent fuel storage. The NRC submitted a petition last year which requested that this situation be addressed.

The petitioner requests that the NRC amend its regulations in 10 CFR Part 50 to require licensees to provide reliable emergency systems to assure long-term cooling and water makeup for spent fuel pools using only onsite power sources. Specifically, the petitioner proposes
amending 10 CFR Part 50 to require that the emergency systems be able to operate for a period of 2 years without human operator intervention and without offsite fuel resupply and that backup power systems for spent fuel pools be electrically isolated from other plant electrical systems during normal and emergency operation.

www.gpo.gov...

As of yet there doesn't seem to be much action on the PRM but at least it's under consideration.

Can't do much about what other nations do and I don't know about their regulation and mitigation strategies but I'm not sure they are as vulnerable as the US is with its extensive, integrated power grid system.


Automatic shutdown systems are only a short term cure for what could be a long term problem. As anybody who has been following the threads about nuclear reactors knows, even if a "safe" shutdown is achieved the reactor core and the fuel pools will still be generating enough heat to melt down if constant long term cooling is not maintained.

And therein lies the rub. They are just now talking about long term shutdown safety. Think about it though. It could take years, if not decades, for congress to finally iron out the bugs in such legislation and pass any kind of bill affecting existing reactors. And they would meet resistance from the industry every step of the way. Such modifications would NOT be cheap and you can bet congress would NOT be providing the funding to accomplish them. Then even when they do, the engineering to design such long term backup systems will take quite a bit of time as will the work of modifying the reactor cooling systems to meet the new standards. And that isn't even taking into account the amount of money it will take to actually do the work.

And then the whole thing would be useless anyway in an EMP attack or a massive worldwide solar event. Such an event would leave all the delicate electronics needed to control a long term cooling system fried. Without the computer "brains" to control it the rest of the system would be little more than an expensive pile of scrap metal.
edit on 16-12-2012 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Such an event would leave all the delicate electronics needed to control a long term cooling system fried. Without the computer "brains" to control it the rest of the system would be little more than an expensive pile of scrap metal.
An EMP attack (not so much a geomagnetic event) can affect electronics but I'm not sure electronics are required to shutdown a reactor.


And therein lies the rub. They are just now talking about long term shutdown safety.
Better now than later. Better now than never.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Heres another source in regards to that photon belt theory. They are saying



"We believe the ribbon is a reflection," says Jacob Heerikhuisen, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from the University of Alabama in Huntsville. "It is where solar wind particles heading out into interstellar space are reflected back into the solar system by a galactic magnetic field."




If they are going out to interstellar space and being reflected then there should be a continues circle of these charged particles forming a band. could this be the Photon Belt everyones talking about?

Source





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