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Proposed ATS Scientific Experiment for next Friday, Dec 21st, 2012 (can we validate a galactic align

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posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I do understand that you are under obligation to be a stick-in-the-mud.

...but don't you suppose that he should be lauded for obtaining (what appears to be) actual legitimate data that he appears to be interpreting correctly? don't see that everyday on ATS.


p.s. NAM: you are making a persuading argument, I just might join you.




posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by tgidkp
 

Thanks for the support tgidkp. All I ask of Phage is that he watch the first half of the video posted in the OP and if need be where appropriate show that the Mayan calendar wasn't so far reaching in it's calculations after all, and did not contain cycles in relation to stellar movements which even to this day for the modern man are unheard of, like our sun;s relationship with Alcyone and Sirius as described in the video, is that all nonsense?



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


That's from earth only, the other was from both sun and earth both pointing to the same intersection,
Um, well yes. Since the "Galactic plane" is a plane that sort of has to happen. And it happens all the time. There is nothing special about it.

The video in the OP is a bunch of nonsense. I'm not going to go into a detailed explanation of precession of the equinoxes but Sirius is not the center of the galaxy and Alcyon is not our Sun.
edit on 12/14/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by NewAgeMan
 
The video in the OP is a bunch of nonsense. I'm not going to go into a detailed explanation of precession of the equinoxes but Sirius is not the center of the galaxy and Alcyon is not our Sun.

Hang on, that's not what he was saying, but that our sun orbits Alcyone and both orbit Sirius which is itself fixed relative to the center of the galaxy and rotates with the galactic rotation. At one point I noticed that he called it the center of the galaxy, but that wasn't what was presented.

edit on 14-12-2012 by NewAgeMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 01:17 AM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 

What? A fixed position but it rotates around the center of the galaxy? That makes a ton of sense.


At one point I noticed that he called it the center of the galaxy, but that wasn't what was presented.
So he's just blabbling nonsense then?
edit on 12/14/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 01:27 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Yes, fixed relative to the center of the galaxy and thus moving only in accordance with the galactic rotation, while Alcyone orbits Sirius and our sun Sol orbits Alcyone, whereby Sirius is the "central star" for both these other star systems who move in orbital relationships with it even as all move together with Sirius in galactic rotation relative to the galactic core.

Phage, if I can come up with anything to validate this in any way, I am going to rub your nose in it because you've got a bit of a snarky attitude which isn't befitting a supposedly scientifically minded and thus open-minded person.

You'd better hope that stars here in this part of the galaxy do not orbit one another at varying speeds as they all move together with the galactic rotation, and in particular, Sol, Alcyone and Sirius, as described, because if it's true and you are WRONG, then I'm never going to let you live it down.

Regards,

NAM

edit on 14-12-2012 by NewAgeMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 01:41 AM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


Phage, if I can come up with anything to validate this in any way, I am going to rub your nose in it in a very big way because you've got a bit of a snarky attitude which isn't befitting a supposedly scientifically minded person.

I'm not really the topic but yes, I do tend to get "snarky" when nonsense is presented as fact.


You'd better hope that stars here in the outer rim do not orbit one another at varying speed as we all move with the galactic rotation and in particular, Sol, Alcyone and Sirius as described, because if it's true and you are WRONG, then I'm never going to let you live it down.
We aren't exactly in the outer rim. The Galaxy is about 100,000-120,000 light years in diameter. We are about 27 light years from the center. That puts us about half way to the rim.

Well, there are some stars with companions (in fact, Sirius has one) but they are not separated by anything like the distance between us and Sirius. Or us and Alcyone. Or Alcyone and Sirius. There is just not enough gravitational attraction to cause it.

I'm shaking in my boots.
edit on 12/14/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 02:00 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 



I'm shaking in my boots.


your snarky boots?



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by tgidkp
 

Python boots



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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This alignment is kind of special, in that it only happens once a year.

But it happens every year.




posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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The Mayans started with the end date and worked backwards from there, and it would make sense that their calendar describes a cycle within a cycle pointing to the idea of a "Great Year", and if the turning point is in alignment with the galactic center and plane, which it appears to be, then I think that the experiment might still be worth conducting. I hope those who've indicated they're in are still in..?

Phage, I'll be doing some research in terms of our sun's relationship with the surrounding stars, including Sirius and Alcyone. According to you our sun isn't orbiting anything except the center of the galaxy.

Edit: Concluded that our sun is not in orbit around Alcyone, but that we cannot rule out that kind of relationship with Sirius.

edit on 14-12-2012 by NewAgeMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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Ok people, I'm starting to get kind of excited about this upcoming experiment, and yes I don't mind if it's proven false, but what if we get some anomalous data showing unusual behavior during the Mayan solstice - wouldn't that be exciting?!

Still skeptical as to whether it's even worthwhile? I was thinking that too, but I think there may be reason for a certain amount of cautious optimism in regards to the upcoming experiment. Why?

Well, from additional research from the thread December 21st, 2012 11:11am GMT - Snapshot from Earth and Sun. I've evaluated that there is a correlation between the Galactic Plane and the Galactic Equator, whereby the Galactic Plane is an approximated line through the middle of the area of greatest MASS in the galaxy. Therefore, not unlike a solar eclipse where there have been observed, with pendulum experiments, unusual chaotic behavior in the swinging pendulum due to a gravitational influence from the alignment of earth moon and sun, what we have on this solstice is an alignment with the Earth Sun and Galactic Plane (center line through the average area of the most Galactic mass including the central bulge because that's where the most mass is).

Therefore, aside from a full solar eclipse, there is no better time to conduct just such an experiment whereby there may be hope for some sort of anomaly, which, in the context of this experiment, would involve your pendulum moving from a general north/south axis (were going to launch them from a southern position, towards the north/south axis), back and forth, back and forth, to a wild and more chaotic swinging pattern during the "crossover" point of intersection with the galactic plane.

I hope whoever's in is still in - anyone else?

edit on 15-12-2012 by NewAgeMan because: edit



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


I am tracking this. lots to do in the next week. I don't like commitment.

but its better than picking my nose waiting for something to go boom.

seems easy enough, huh?



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 

If your aim is to conduct a valid scientific experiment be sure to use effective controls in your experiment. This means, at the most basic level, isolating your pendulum(s) from outside influences (drafts, EMFs, temperature, atmospheric pressure). Each experimenter should use more than one pendulum to ensure that the effects are consistent at a given location. It would also be a good idea to test your equipment before that all important date.
edit on 12/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by NewAgeMan
Clock

www.december212012.com...




posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 10:14 PM
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I'm pacific standard time PST here in Vancouver and just did the conversion here

www.timeanddate.com...

to December 21st, 2012 @ 11:11GMT using location of Greenwich Borrow UK (which I'm sure is GMT)

and for me it's 3:00am (3:11am to be precise) on Friday the 21st and I'll be drinking up a storm during my company Christmas party the night before on the 20th, and I don't have a working video camera, so I'm afraid that I'm out for next Friday, but please don't let that stop anyone else from carrying it out.

The mechanics of a Pendulum are pretty straightforward, the only thing that people might want to agree upon is the length of their pendulum, and it will have to be connected to a solid stand of some kind that people can see is steady and isn't moving around at all, and as Phage said, with no breeze or air movement of any kind, but as to the rest, there's no controlling it perfectly - this is more a curiosity than anything really serious.

Maybe I can get something set up I don't know I'll see what I can do, but I hope the others are still in and that more yet still might join in on the experiment.

Best Regards,

NAM

edit on 15-12-2012 by NewAgeMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


I'll do it. I don't know how it is going to work here though, the compass spins around in circles a lot in back of the house. Do you want me to set up something over that weird area of the yard? Or just in the house where things are more normal. Well, as normal as they can be with me and the cats here
The pendulum will make a great cat toy

Yes it will make a great cat toy post experiment! (that's cute)

What time zone are you in btw?



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


this is more a curiosity than anything really serious.

Which is a direct contradiction to the title of the thread. A scientific experiment is not a curiosity. It is a carefully designed and documented procedure.

In performing a "curiosity" instead of a scientific experiment you will undoubtedly come up with subjective observations which confirm your personal biases. Like a Ouija board.



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by NewAgeMan
 


Eastern standard time.



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Then for you it would be 12:11am EST on the 21st (this Friday), so you'd start the pendulum's swing a few minutes prior to that, depending on experimentation with the equipment to see how well it maintains it's swing on a steady axis.






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