Survival Planning and the 5 Paragraph Order

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posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 06:40 PM
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The 5 Paragraph Order



I learned the 5 Paragraph Order in the Marines and have been using it ever since.

This is effective and easy to use.

Without a plan, you are quite simply BAIT

Don't think you can "keep it all in your head".. You can not.

Enjoy

Semper




posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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Thank you, Garth. I will be using your format for any number of things I have cooking, including SURVIVAL. Looking forward to tonight's show. -Eron



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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I hate 5 paragraph orders.

I refuse to use them on principal.



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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reply to post by watchitburn
 


Fairly narrow minded, would you not say?

Yes?

Semper



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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I already have a plan:

1. Don't panic
2. Let everyone else panic and run.
3. Watch where everyone else runs to.
4. Go where all the other people are NOT going.
5. #4 usually involves grabbing a sailboat while everyone else goes for the hills to compete with each other and starve.
5a. Sailboat = travel anywhere and everywhere else on the planet that can get got to from water




edit on 13-12-2012 by Druscilla because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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Any planning is just good, common, sense.
Preparation for any event, be it survival, or just travel, is all to often overlooked.
It can mean the difference between a 5-minute early arrival time or life and death.

I truly appreciate the 6 "P"'s and teach them to everyone that is unaware.

Prior
Planning
Prevents
Piss
Poor
Performance

Or whatever order and words you like to substitute.
Either way, any type of solid preparations always succeed when thought-out beforehand.
Sometimes "winging it" works but more often leads to wasted time and effort.
When it comes to survival, any wasted time or effort could prove to be calamitous.



Excellent addition to the list Semper.






posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla
I already have a plan:

1. Don't panic
2. Let everyone else panic and run.
3. Watch where everyone else runs to.
4. Go where all the other people are NOT going.
5. #4 usually involves grabbing a sailboat while everyone else goes for the hills to compete with each other and starve.
5a. Sailboat = travel anywhere and everywhere else on the planet that can get got to from water




edit on 13-12-2012 by Druscilla because: (no reason given)


Plan
5b,grab a fishing pole or two and some water.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 08:45 AM
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I like it. I write everything down on actual paper and get poked at because I don't store anything of major importance in an iPad. Critical information is recorded in my leather bound Rite in Rain notebook. Keep a Space Pen Handy as well.

Proper
Planning
Prevents
Piss
Poor
Performance




posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 09:17 AM
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What a horrible idea!
Write down your plans and your equipment, locations, possible accomplices...
Not in an orwellian world where a bill like the ndaa is considered good and law...
I choose not to breach opsec and keep the plan firmly rooted in the bean.
practice practice practice.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by jibeho
I like it. I write everything down on actual paper and get poked at because I don't store anything of major importance in an iPad. Critical information is recorded in my leather bound Rite in Rain notebook. Keep a Space Pen Handy as well.

Proper
Planning
Prevents
Piss
Poor
Performance



Just have to say, "Sorry about your mom blowing up, Ricky".

Best avatar I've seen in a loooong time.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


I don't think so.

Yes, it is a good tool. And if used properly, you will have all your bases covered.
But in my experience, a lot of officers get completely carried away with it. To the point where there is no room for quick common sense decisions to be made.

This is just my opinion based on personal observations, but to each his own.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla
I already have a plan:

1. Don't panic
2. Let everyone else panic and run.
3. Watch where everyone else runs to.
4. Go where all the other people are NOT going.
5. #4 usually involves grabbing a sailboat while everyone else goes for the hills to compete with each other and starve.
5a. Sailboat = travel anywhere and everywhere else on the planet that can get got to from water




edit on 13-12-2012 by Druscilla because: (no reason given)


I have something very similar called
"Watch what everyone else is doing and don't do it!" Goes with a lot of things, television, movies, fashion, trends. Herd mentality scares me...

OP thank you for the post, I have written out a evac plan but have not seen this before.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 02:58 PM
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When I see some guys dressed in survival clothes out in back in the woods maybe I'll invite them in for coffee. I'm getting too old for that kind of stuff, let the younger guys do it. I'll have cookies too, maybe I'll attract wrabbits with those.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by watchitburn
But in my experience, a lot of officers get completely carried away with it. To the point where there is no room for quick common sense decisions to be made.

This is just my opinion based on personal observations, but to each his own.


No plan ever survives the first engagement - however, the unit will likely not survive in the absence of a plan.

It is only a leaping off point and a coordinating tool. The higher the echelon of execution the more fluid the situation and the more authority one has to deviate from the plan/order.

I don't know what rank/level you were during your service but at squad/platoon and company level there is not a lot of wiggle room for leaders. That is by design because in most cases those leaders lack experience to make such deviations.

I do agree; however, that a weak officer will use his reliance on the order format as a crutch for his indecisiveness or lack of audacity in a lot of situations.



posted on Dec, 14 2012 @ 04:09 PM
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For all those 6P's responses, its really 7P's...

Proper
Prior
Planning
Prevents
Piss
Poor
Performance




posted on Jan, 22 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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I don't have a military background, so this is a new (and a bit alien) set of goggles to look through. Thanks for pointing it out.

I have a flow chart. I can't upload it because it has private information, and all my planning is kept in analogue form (Babylon has trouble mining information that isn't in a digital format).

Basically, I have my supplies divided up into a series of kits, collections of tools. My chart organizes my response by which tools are needed for various emergencies I am responding to.

For example, "Fallout" might involve the medical kit, plus extra equipment for dealing with contamination. If time permits, there are tarps for protecting some of the garden's soil. as well as radiation meters and their non-battery dependent backups. The food storage is proof against radioactive dust as well as moderate exposure. Some of the water is open to the air--the rain catchment system will be dangerous, unless it has been shut off and covered from nuke-dust.

Earthquake would require the medical kit, but not the contamination gear. Instead, the fireman's pick, ladder, spraypaint and come-along for the search for survivors. The tools to cut off the gas and water mains will be a priority. The food must be checked for damage to jars, and blankets or coldpacks depending on the season....

The flow chart saves you time and prevents forgetting important factors. It also equips the wife & kids when they are in shock, or if I am not among the survivors.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by tovenar
 


Great idea with the flow chart-i've always gone for the keeping it in my head route, but i'm having your plan now.



posted on Feb, 14 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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My planning (prepping, or just honey-do list) is all grouped by timeline...as things cost money, time, etc.

I break it down as:

IMMEDIATE - Within the month
SOONER - Within 3-6 months
SOON - Within 6-9 months
SHORT TERM - Within a year to 2 years
LONG TERM - Within 3 to 5 years

That way, I can stay on track, prioritize, etc. My biggest (and most expensive) goal (and it's in the long term category), is to go solar/wind combo and actually be able to sell power back to the grid. I have a lot of sunny roof space for panels (the house, the separate garage, two separate stable buildings, a horse shelter, and hay storage building), and we can get quite a bit of wind.

Of course, I'm not using doomsday prepping as my reason..it's more geared to not having a power bill, so we'd be off the grid except cable (we're already off grid for water, as we have a well, etc.), and geared for maintaining our quality of life due to power interruption, a bad storm, or even prolonged unemployment, etc. I'm working now, but it took months to find the job, so we definitely used some prepping supplies to stretch our budget. So, my wife's already seen a real and tangible benefit to prepping.

Also, we had a slab water leak, and had to go days without running water... Suddenly, getting those 50 gallon water barrels a while back wasn't such a bad idea, hehe.... Allowed us to fill toilets, provide water for the horses, etc. during that time. Prepping can have some real benefits that most aren't aware of.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I really enjoyed your reply to this forum. We too use some of our supplies for emergency rations- or at least have had to. It cycles the supply and you have less danger of it going bad, I think. We live in an rv as a permanent situation (due to work), and so being able to store supplies is limited. However, we can make a month easily just from what we have for groceries now, so I don't worry so much. I also live in a relatively unpopulated area without any really big cities. Driving 300 miles for groceries is the "norm" for us.

OP- great idea to put out here- alot of folks will benefit from your experience. I don't think that it will work for everyone, but it's a great idea as a place to start for those who have no plan whatsoever, or are attempting to store extended information in their heads. Thanks!


Like I said, we live in an RV permanently, so our options are much different than the usual scenario. That being said, we have managed to get the most important things we will need for a life off the grid, using moderation as the key and focusing on long term survival. We have even practiced life off the grid, for several months at a time, and found we actually enjoy it quite a bit. Kind of a trial run. It was a great learning experience for us both.





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