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The Megalithic Mystery at Fort Walsh, Canada. Insight needed!

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posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by SeekingDepth
 


Great, more pics! Thanks for the effort! Nice potholes, and then I spotted one petroglyph too.




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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Weathering of granitic joints forming blocks:


Combined with weathered pans which produce nice holes:



www.yosemite.ca.us...



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks. More of the same resemblance in that image. Maybe there is a reason after all why it is considered as natural.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by xXxinfidelxXx
reply to post by boncho
 


The Canadian Shield was formed when giant glaciers (which also shaped-out the Hudson's Bay) started to recede, leaving behind all of the rocks and minerals that they had scraped off the ground on their way south. There are no volcanoes in Canada, extinct or otherwise.



The Canadian Shield, also called the Laurentian Plateau, or Bouclier Canadien (French), is a vast geological shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American or Laurentia craton. It is an area mostly composed of igneous rock which relates to its long volcanic history.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
reply to post by boncho
 


That single photo does hold resemblance, though I'm not fully convinced yet. The surroundings were too different. No aliens in my mind


Thanks anyway!


I wish I had some photos of what I saw in person. There is a trail system about 2 hours away from a town called Huntsville, in the Muskoka region. There you will find some really incredible rock formations. Some are giant rectangular shape and it looks like they were carved straight out the side of a mountain.

Doesn't really help not having pics though...

Pics or it didn't happen I guess?




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


You need to do more research on glacial movements in this country before trying to debate such a thing. Igneous rock, like any other forms found in the Canadian Shield, was scraped and dragged down by glacial movements and left there when said glaciers receded. You're gonna need more than one sentence to disprove that.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


You do realize that we were debating the origins of the Canadian Shield.....right? So I was wrong about there being no volcanoes in Canada. That does not make the origins of the Canadian Shield in any way volcanic.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by OnWhiteMars
 


How about looking up something that actually has something to do with the Canadian Shield, and then we'll talk. I was wrong about there being no volcanoes in Canada, big whoop. The origins of the Canadian Shield, however, are common knowledge in Ontario, at least among those with an IQ higher than the double-digits.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by xXxinfidelxXx
reply to post by boncho
 


You need to do more research on glacial movements in this country before trying to debate such a thing. Igneous rock, like any other forms found in the Canadian Shield, was scraped and dragged down by glacial movements and left there when said glaciers receded. You're gonna need more than one sentence to disprove that.


Glacial movements gave the shield its appearance and arrangement, but I don't understand how you can say volcanoes had nothing to do with their creation.


The shield is considered to have been originally an area of very large mountains and much volcanic activity, but over the millennia the area was eroded to its current topographic appearance of relatively low relief (984 to 1,968.5 feet above sea level) with diverse ridges and low mountain ranges. It is considered the first region in North America to be elevated permanently above sea level, not having been subsequently submerged by encroachments of the oceans.

The shield contains some of the most ancient volcanoes on earth. It has over 150 volcanic belts (now deformed and eroded down to nearly flat plains) that range from 600 to 1,200 million years old. Each belt probably grew by the coalescence of accumulations erupted from numerous vents, making the tally of volcanoes in the hundreds. Many of Canada's major ore deposits are associated with Precambrian volcanoes.

Mountains have deep roots and float on denser mantle, much like an iceberg at sea. As mountains erode, their roots rise and are eroded in turn. The rocks that now form the surface of the shield were once far below the earth's surface. The high pressures and temperatures at those depths provided ideal conditions for mineralization.
The North American craton is the bedrock forming the heart of the North American continent and the Canadian Shield is the largest exposed part of the craton's bedrock. The Canadian Shield is part of an ancient continent called Arctica, which was formed about 2.5 billion years ago. It was split into Greenland, Laurasia, Scotland, Siberia, East Antarctica and is now roughly situated in the Arctic around the current North Pole.

www.newworldencyclopedia.org...

How igneous rock is formed:


Igneous rocks are called fire rocks and are formed either underground or above ground. Underground, they are formed when the melted rock, called magma, deep within the earth becomes trapped in small pockets. As these pockets of magma cool slowly underground, the magma becomes igneous rocks.

Igneous rocks are also formed when volcanoes erupt, causing the magma to rise above the earth's surface. When magma appears above the earth, it is called lava. Igneous rocks are formed as the lava cools above ground.

www.fi.edu...



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by xXxinfidelxXx
reply to post by boncho
 


There are no volcanoes in Canada, extinct or otherwise.


What....?


A quick wiki search can provide you with a plethora of volcanoes in Canada. active or not.

I actually lived a few blocks from one called Giants Head.

In fact the entire Okanagan Valley is one huge volcanic basin.


edit: apologies. It seems you've already discovered that was incorrect.


edit on 12-12-2012 by HIWATT because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by xXxinfidelxXx
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


You do realize that we were debating the origins of the Canadian Shield.....right? So I was wrong about there being no volcanoes in Canada. That does not make the origins of the Canadian Shield in any way volcanic.

There very are very ancient volcanoes in the shield region.
As per the wiki on the shield

The multitude of rivers and lakes in the entire region is caused by the watersheds of the area being so young and in a state of sorting themselves out with the added effect of post-glacial rebound. The Shield was originally an area of very large mountains (about 12,000 metres or 39,000 feet) [7] with much volcanic activity, but over hundreds of million of years, the area has been eroded to its current topographic appearance of relatively low relief. [citation needed] It has some of the oldest (extinct) volcanoes on the planet.

en.m.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 12:24 AM
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Back to the topic. As it seems the foundation is naturally formed, but what intrigued me was the remark ofit as an holy place. That only a few have the 'right' to visit the place. Though, that might be very common in cases like this, when Mother Nature has provided the surroundings.

Thanks for all the contribution so far!
edit on 13-12-2012 by OnWhiteMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


While there is a resemblance between the Yosemite stones and the Canadian stones, I can't help but notice that the joins and/or seams in the Yosemite version seem in a straight line.. where as the Canadian version seem to be more of a brick or patchwork style, as if laid.

Secondly, the Yosemite are granite-based, if I read you correctly. . Do we know if the Canadian are of the same granite-type stone or not?

Glancing around the interwebz, I see a vague similarity, but nothing that would immediately halt my mind from wandering further into the mystery.

S&F for the OP. Amazing find.



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by OnWhiteMars
 


I agree, from my opinion, whether or not the rocks were formed naturally is not the question but if the area held significant interest to the ancient people that lived there as sacred. this is just me though....



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks. More of the same resemblance in that image. Maybe there is a reason after all why it is considered as natural.


I've seen many similar sites, and the jointing and structure is indeed natural. While there ARE sites where Native Americans carved round holes into the rock (we have some here in Texas) for storage purposes (generally arrowheads, it seems) and while some shallower holes were used as "baserock mortars" where they ground up either pigments for paint or prepared grains for flour, etc -- this is not directly near a water source and wouldn't have been used as a living area.

It's a neat looking formation, though.



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by OnWhiteMars
Back to the topic. As it seems the foundation is naturally formed, but what intrigued me was the remark ofit as an holy place. That only a few have the 'right' to visit the place. Though, that might be very common in cases like this, when Mother Nature has provided the surroundings.

Thanks for all the contribution so far!
edit on 13-12-2012 by OnWhiteMars because: (no reason given)

The question would be WHEN was it designated as a "holy site" and by whom?

The "change in consciousness" (i.e. "New Age") brought about by the 1960's meant that people were eagerly hunting up places they would then call "sacred spaces" or "holy spaces." A lot of times the designation wasn't because of some tribal or ancient cultural reason, but simply because they and their friends felt it was special.

Canadian Indian culture was not the same as American Indian Culture (the landscape and seasons were different... winter started earlier, there were different animals to hunt and different resources.) While there MAY be some artifacts there (Medicine wheel would be about the only permanent "holy structure" and those are difficult to date), in general a Native American group isn't going to have a holy space that is far from water and food (you want vision seekers to come back alive... not die.)

And there's no signs of long-term use (if there were, that place would have been designated as a world cultural center long before this.)



posted on Dec, 16 2012 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Thank you Byrd for your information! Always appreciated






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