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What did North Korea put into orbit?

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posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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I am not so surprised at North Korea's move to test fire a new long range rocket.

But I was surprised at the medias lack of concern that it was more than a test. They did and it was confirmed by NORAD they did indeed successfully place an object into orbit.

here is the quote: The North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, later confirmed that North Korea did appear to have put an object into space. "Initial indications are that the missile deployed an object that appeared to achieve orbit," NORAD said in a statement.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...

Now the question remains what did North Korea put into orbit?




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Since when do missiles put payloads into orbit? I know a rocket is a type of missile, but it is called a rocket to differentiate the function from a missile, no?

As for what is in orbit now, it must not be that different than what others put up, even if we don't know all that is up there.

sigh.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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their leader



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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A Mr. Coffee!



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


According to the four INMARSAT C "urgent" telex messages that came through on my vessel today just after 0100hrs UTC, they launched a Satellite.

The Philippines, Japan and Korean Peninsula MES (Mobile earth stations) were effectively put on standby to watch for falling debris/object.

The forth message was a stand-down completion message around 0923hrs GMT.

Specific details of completion message:

NAVAREA XI WARNING
NAVAREA XI 0832/12
YELLOW SEA, EAST CHINA SEA AND
NORTH PACIFIC, LUZON.
ROCKET LAUNCHING CONCLUDED.
CANCEL 0822/12 AND THIS MESSAGE.

That's the "official" explanation anyway.

But, a "satellite" by definition, could be a number of different things.
edit on 12-12-2012 by Sublimecraft because: added comment and clarified UTC completion time



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


They turned the current leaders his deceased father into orbit, turned his corpse into a mutated cyborg to munch away at the satellites of the US of A.


XD




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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This morning's news reported that it was a satellite.

What they didn't report was that it was a satellite that would be used to locate women who would voluntarily date their leader. Were he to mature.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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Putting a can of soup in orbit would be a triumph for them.
2nd line...



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by ChesterJohn
I am not so surprised at North Korea's move to test fire a new long range rocket.

But I was surprised at the medias lack of concern that it was more than a test. They did and it was confirmed by NORAD they did indeed successfully place an object into orbit.

here is the quote: The North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, later confirmed that North Korea did appear to have put an object into space. "Initial indications are that the missile deployed an object that appeared to achieve orbit," NORAD said in a statement.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...

Now the question remains what did North Korea put into orbit?


edition.cnn.com...

So I'm somehow relating this to the Killshot Sequence event. Remember? The satellite/rocket that would fall down into Earth (because of a Meteor Shower) and is connected to the North Korean government? I'm thinking that may be the case, so all we're missing now is a meteor shower to fall very soon. Personally I don't fully believe it, but I have to admit it's a pretty damn sure coincidence to say the least.

To those who are not familiar with the Killshot Sequence event, here's the documentary:



I'll keep an eye on this thread, S&F.
edit on 12-12-2012 by kromaion because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by ChesterJohn
I am not so surprised at North Korea's move to test fire a new long range rocket.

But I was surprised at the medias lack of concern that it was more than a test. They did and it was confirmed by NORAD they did indeed successfully place an object into orbit.

here is the quote: The North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, later confirmed that North Korea did appear to have put an object into space. "Initial indications are that the missile deployed an object that appeared to achieve orbit," NORAD said in a statement.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...

Now the question remains what did North Korea put into orbit?


I don't know....but I'm sure it pushes the envelope of what can be done using their state-of-the-art aluminum foil and christmas tree light technologies.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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I've got a gut feeling we will find out what this mystery object is the hard way. How can we view planets orbiting distant stars but can't figure out what something in our orbit is?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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Well, Sputnik was a satellite. lol..... The DPRK's definition of a satellite and our definition of one are likely two very very different things. Having said that.....Iran has orbited things multiple times and successfully orbited and recovered a live animal, for example. Other nations do progress at a steady rate whether we give them our blessing or not.

North Korea though? Err... Yeah... Home of the first failed nuclear detonation test in Man's history for a first attempt. They don't inspire confidence that this was a North Korean Keyhole or something. Probably more like a rather boring Sputnik type object to confirm they can do it without crashing it.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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Ok, I will guess.

A rice steamer?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by dorkfish87
I've got a gut feeling we will find out what this mystery object is the hard way. How can we view planets orbiting distant stars but can't figure out what something in our orbit is?


Just because the general public does not know does not mean that people within the gov don't. I would expect it is a very primitive satelitte. Perhaps nothing more than a shell since spending real money on it would be foolish considering the norths history of launch failures.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:34 AM
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Just did a search for this topic, and it seems this is the only thread dealing with it- which I find suprising- thought ATS would have been all over it. They (NK) are claiming a weather satellite, but I think its pretty obvious they are proving a point- showing that they can get the technology to work.

Its a very dangerous, worrying move, and I for one am unsettled by the timing. NK had been telling the world that the launch would be postponed, and I think its caught many countries off guard.

Connections being made in MSM to Iranian assistance with rocket tech- nuclear armageddon anyone?


uk.reuters.com...
edit on 12-12-2012 by Thunda because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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it's nukes. Lot's of them.
It's time you go over there and bust some Korean ass.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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I wouldn't worry X35 is probably up there and could examine / eliminate any threats.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by libertytoall
 


Yeah, but you know...they could be hiding some back there on mainland.
It's best to check. Safety first.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by ChesterJohn
 


Explanation: S&F!

Ok it was launched on a Unha-3 (rocket) [wiki] which is basically a copy of the Taepodong-2 long-range ballistic missile, which has a payload capacity of ...


Capacity
Payload to LEO 100 kilograms (220 lb) ? (possibly to a 250 km orbit with 90° inclination)[citation needed] (220 lb)



On December 12, 2012, the Unha-3 rocket was launched at 00:49 UTC (7:49 EST). The U.S Northern Command said that the first stage of the rocket fell into the Yellow Sea, while the second stage was assessed to had fallen into the Philippine Sea and confirmed that an object had entered orbit.


Designation Date Launch Site Payload Remarks
Unha-1 4 July 2006 Tonghae Unknown Failed early in flight, possibly intended to be suborbital
Unha-2 5 April 2009 Tonghae Kwangmyŏngsŏng-2 Failed to reach orbit
Unha-3 13 April 2012 Sohae Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 Failed to reach orbit
Unha-3 12 December 2012 Sohae Second version of Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 Successful launch. ...
S.Korea military official cited 3 stage success. DPRK confirmed.


And the NK's claims about the ... Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 (reflight) [wiki]


North Korea said the satellite would estimate crop yields and collect weather data as well as assess the country's forest coverage and natural resources. It also said the satellite weighed about 100 kilograms (200 lb) and that its planned lifetime was about two years. Inside a room at the launch facility, reporters were allowed to see the satellite.


Lets now look at that satellites orbital characteristics ...


Orbital elements
Semimajor axis 6,921 km (4,301 mi)
Eccentricity 0.0065
Inclination 97.4°
Apoapsis 584.18 km (362.99 mi)
Periapsis 499.7 km (310.5 mi)
Orbital period 95.50 minutes


(See here for great graphic [news.nationalpost.com] )

North Korean rocket 'puts satellite into orbit' (by By North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy, staff Updated 8 hours 15 minutes ago) [abc.net.au]


The first stage of the rocket splashed into the Yellow Sea, the second stage dropped into the East China Sea, and the final stage plunged into the Pacific east of the Philippines, all as planned.

The Japanese government said the rocket had passed over Okinawa, south of the Japanese mainland, but said it had not followed through with earlier threats to shoot it down because there was no threat from rocket debris.

North Korea said its satellite had been successfully placed into orbit.

"The launch of the second version of our Kwangmyongsong-3 satellite from the Sohae Space Centre... on December 12 was successful," the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said.

"The satellite has entered the orbit as planned," it added.




Photo: North Korea has carried out a successful long-range rocket test, in defiance of international pressure.



Photo: A South Korean TV mock-up shows the rocket's projected flight path (AFP: Jung Yeon-Je)

Seems that is the basics that everybody agrees upon.


Personal Disclosure: Now that we have our facts straight .. we can distort them as we please!


I bet, in addition to its scientific and technical payload, that it has some proximity detectors, some small extendable solar panels, a small orbital engine and even a small lump of plastic explosives for a whole plethora of murkey and technical reasons.

Mainly this reason ... Boeing X-37 [wiki]


OTV-1's second mission, the third X-37B mission overall, was originally scheduled to be launched on 25 October 2012, but was postponed because of an engine issue with the Atlas V launch vehicle. On 11 December 2012, OTV-1 was launched successfully from Cape Canaveral.






Congratulations to North Korea on its successfull and peacefull mission!



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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It is certainly a nuke.

There is nothing else they want up there but the ability to EM strike the States.





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