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12-12-2012 "Meteorite Crash" In Sweden (Pictures)

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posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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reply to post by Triztheone
 

Sure it's not your fault, nowdays it's common confusion with these events as many pics circulating on the net.
And another thing with the pics that first two were taken at the night time while the third one was obviously taken on the sunset or dawn.




posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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Originally posted by Triztheone
The only LEGITIMATE PIC is the third one, this one bellow:



No - that is not a legitimate photograph of the event either.

It was a frame-grab from this video, which is not a genuine meteor either:



As I have found in the past, very rarely are genuine photographs/footage posted in connection with such events for the simple reason that meteors are so fast, people do not have time to react before they are gone.


Also, the title of this thread is rather misleading. There is no evidence of a "crash".

It's actually quite common for big meteors/fireballs to cause rumbling/shaking/sonic-booms when they penetrate deeply into the atmosphere (around 50 km altitude minimum is required for booms to be heard on the ground).

However, most meteoroids that survive relatively intact down to this altitude are slowed right down by the increasing density of our atmosphere below 50km altitude, and these kind of booms are usually caused by the meteoroid/s breaking the sound barrier at high altitude. It does not mean there was any kind of impact with the ground.

It does not help that there is also a common illusion that occurs when a meteor is seen "low down" in the sky and appears to land near by, but that is only an illusion in by far the vast majority of cases. As I wrote in this thread, inexperienced observers often get it wrong: How good are we at estimating the distance and altitude of UFOs?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Triztheone







- It sounded nothing in the sky when it flew over us. Then it hit bottom near Klarälven somewhere. Then we were struck by the sound, like an echo after the explosion, she says to Aftonbladet and continues:



Do meteors explode?
If it hit the ground I would have thought they might have known where there was an explosion.It's a shame we don't have any pictures but they don't always help. I hope we get an update on this.

It seems I messed up quoting again.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 

Hey now... I was going to ping you but see you're already on it.


It was a frame-grab from this video, which is not a genuine meteor either:


May I ask what you think it likely this was? I get the sonic boom art and the illusion of distance. But aspects of it seem real enough. Could it be a flare?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
May I ask what you think it likely this was? I get the sonic boom art and the illusion of distance. But aspects of it seem real enough. Could it be a flare?


I'm not sure, but my best guess would be a missile/rocket, or perhaps a military aircraft with the after-burner going.

It's certainly not a meteor - meteors don't make obvious turns like this object is doing. A meteor would also be well above the clouds, but in this case the clouds are not lit up as they would be if it was behind them.

In this meteor compilation there are a few examples of real meteors that are behind the clouds, and you can see that the way they are lit up is nothing like the case in question:


If it was a meteor that was very close (as it would have to be if it was below the clouds), then the shock-waves would reach the camera-man relatively quickly, and it would be obvious, as everything would be shaking/rattling. Since there is no evidence of this, or any other reports, that rings alarm bells and raises my suspensions that was was something else.

Also, if you look carefully, you can see that there is a non-luminous object during brief moments when the object is not luminous - again this is inconsistent with a meteor.



Meteors don't suddenly go from being luminous to non-luminous and back again, since they are luminous due to their high velocity. For this to occur a meteor would have to slow down, then speed up again, and so on. Meteors don't generally break the laws of physics, as this would suggest if it was a meteor!



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:54 PM
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Wow that thing is bright. Check out the last photo in the op. Don't think I have seen a photo of a meteor that bright...Good find


S/F

-SAP-



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


It's not a meteor - read the rest of the thread!

Also, there are photos/footage of real meteors that are much brighter than the object in that frame-grab. See the compilation I posted in my previous post to this thread for examples. Another example is the recent Texas fireball which was estimated by many to be on par with the brightness of the Sun.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 

Intrptr kneels, bows... backs out of room, kneeling and bowing...



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 


I'm not convinced it's anything else.

The only thing that seems off to me if the brightness of the object. Other than that it resembles a lot of meteor photos. I have even seen some fall in my own life.

Not a exact fit with this photo, but damn close.

-SAP-



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by bdb818888
Its Nibru !!!!!! run to your underground bunkers


Should have said "run to your underground debunkers"



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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So, am I right in thinking that none of the OP's photos are of the object?

Also, interesting eyewitness quote:

" I thought maybe it was a comet, for it looked a bit like a ball. It was a red and yellow light around and after, she says, adding that she had seen shooting stars before, and this is not at all like that. "

Another quote from local news:

"The whole house was shaking"
What is it that has struck down in Värmland?
SOS, police and the air force have all received phone calls from worried värmlennians after the orb of light is said to have exploded last night.
"It lit up the sky and flew over us, then we heard an explosion.", says Jessica Berg in Stöllet.

edit on 12-12-2012 by Thunda because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


I guess photo 3 in the OP is the only original photo of it. Not sure if that is true or not.

-SAP-



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:45 PM
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Originally posted by SloAnPainful
reply to post by FireballStorm
 


I'm not convinced it's anything else.

The only thing that seems off to me if the brightness of the object. Other than that it resembles a lot of meteor photos.


Just because something resembles something, does not mean it is that something. Iron pyrite (fools gold) resembles gold, but it's not gold.

Actually the brightness of a meteor can easily exceed the Sun in brightness in some cases, believe it or not.



Originally posted by SloAnPainful
I have even seen some fall in my own life.


So have I - probably over 10,000 in 15 years of observing meteors.


Originally posted by SloAnPainful
Not a exact fit with this photo, but damn close.


It's not even a photo - it's a frame-grab from video footage, as I demonstrated above.


So, if it's a meteor, then would you care to explain the inconsistencies present in the footage that I pointed out in my reply to intrptr above?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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Just a thought here, we had a fly-by of an asteroid literally around the same time, possible that it had some tag-a-longs?

Just a thought...



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by FireballStorm
 


There simply isn't enough data to go off of to say it was anything else in my opinion. The "frame grab" doesn't show anything more or less.

It doesn't look like a rocket to me...But I am not expert. I was just putting in my opinion on the matter.

Again not enough data I think. May be if we had more I could provide more in depth details of my opinion.

Great info though none the less.

-SAP-



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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Off the coast of Hawaii in 1997 I saw a large meteorite land in the pacific ocean as it cruised overhead - it looked like giant ball of paper on fire with a huge smoke trial behind it. It was very bright, and happened around 3AM (I was working, and yes it was so bright it lit up its own smoke trail). I could hearing it burning, a loud, low whooshing sound (kinda like a fireplace but louder) before it disappeared. It was an orange fire and it did not explode, simply vanished over the horizon, but it was low and about to hit water.

Anyways, the explosion part has me interested. That sucker hit land.




edit on 12-12-2012 by Jason88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by Thunda
So, am I right in thinking that none of the OP's photos are of the object?


Correct.


Originally posted by Thunda
Also, interesting eyewitness quote:

" I thought maybe it was a comet, for it looked a bit like a ball. It was a red and yellow light around and after, she says, adding that she had seen shooting stars before, and this is not at all like that. "


This was certainly not your average "shooting star".

Comments like this are not unusual from people who have seen a big fireball for the first time. Only an inexperienced person would write something like "I thought maybe it was a comet". Comets (as any reasonably experienced astronomer knows) do not appear to move in the sky!





Originally posted by Thunda
Another quote from local news:

"The whole house was shaking"
What is it that has struck down in Värmland?
SOS, police and the air force have all received phone calls from worried värmlennians after the orb of light is said to have exploded last night.
"It lit up the sky and flew over us, then we heard an explosion.", says Jessica Berg in Stöllet.


If you look at previous reports of big fireballs, all of these things are consistent with them.

Most people have no previous experience with events like this, and will often misidentify big meteors for a number of reasons, which I looked at in my thread here: How good are we at estimating the distance and altitude of UFOs?

There are specific examples related to previous meteors there if you care to look.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by SloAnPainful
I guess photo 3 in the OP is the only original photo of it. Not sure if that is true or not.


Definitely not true, as I have tried (in vain it seems) to point out numerous times



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by FireballStorm

Originally posted by SloAnPainful
I guess photo 3 in the OP is the only original photo of it. Not sure if that is true or not.


Definitely not true, as I have tried (in vain it seems) to point out numerous times


Lol that was before I knew they were all fake. Relax man.

-SAP-



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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Originally posted by Jason88
I saw a large meteorite land in the pacific ocean


Highly unlikely!

But it is common for people to misinterpret what they are seeing and have the false impression that something hit land/sea:


Due to their great brightness large meteors often create a remarkable optical illusion in which it appears that they have hit the ground somewhere nearby. The glowing fireballs we see in the night sky are caused by atmospheric pressure and friction, but meteors stop ablating (burning) approximately seven miles high. If you are lucky enough to witness a bright fireball, and the flame goes out while it's directly overhead, it is possible that the meteorite will land nearby. When we see a bright shooting star apparently landing close by, what we are usually seeing is a fireball arcing away, over the horizon, still high up in the atmosphere. Due to the curvature of the Earth, the fireball may seem to hit the ground, but has in fact just moved out of our field of view and gone beyond the horizon. Because of its extreme brightness the fireball appears — to our human eyes — to be much closer than it actually is. It's something I, myself, have been fortunate enough to witness a couple of times and it's frustrating because it does look as if the meteorite landed "just over there." However, it probably landed hundreds of miles away. Another thing to consider is that when a meteorite lands near observers, those witnesses report hearing loud sonic booms, and/or "whizzing" noises. If no sound accompanied the spectacle, then the meteor was probably a great distance away. But at least you had the privilege of witnessing a real fireball!

aerolite.org



Experienced sky watchers on SeeSat-L may find it difficult to believe that anyone could misidentify a re-entry as a spaceship, but human perception is notoriously fallible, and no one is immune. Much depends on the circumstances and personal experience. Driving through the wilderness under a pitch black sky, and suddenly faced with a slowly moving formation of brilliant lights can be awe-inspiring and even terrifying. The human mind races to make sense of the unfamiliar, drawing on experience that may be inadequate. Depth perception can play tricks, such that something 200 km away, 100 km long, and moving at 7 km/s, seems to be just 200 m away, 100 m long, and moving 7 km/h - the angular velocity is roughly the same.

Source: Seesat-l mailing list

At the risk of repeating myself, this thread I authored looks at some previous examples of big meteors, and tries to address some of the questions that are raised in such cases: How good are we at estimating the distance and altitude of UFOs?



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