You're not anonymous. I know your name, email, and company.

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posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 06:45 PM
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You're not anonymous. I know your name, email, and company.


42floors.com

There is a “website intelligence” network that tracks form submissions across the network. So, if a visitors fills out a form on Site A with their name and email, Site B knows their name and email too as soon as they land on the site.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
privacylawblog.ffw.com
www.requestpolicy.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink">https:




posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 06:45 PM
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he moment you give personal info to a company that I didn't voluntarily give it to a line has been crossed. The same line, the U.S. government crosses everyday but now it appears businesses are following suit.

HubSpot (and pretty much any other marketing automation tool) has this feature, too

Some comments suggest using ghostery to avoid this panopticlick.eff.org...


42floors.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


xploder
edit on 11-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by atopsecret
 


There was a site (I forget the name) where you voted to send a notice to either a company or the government. I remember one notice was about how Verizon was going to start charging people for paying online.

I voted on a few of these things and I started getting emails from different people and companies that wanted me to do more. This website was giving out our email addresses. That P'd me off!
edit on 12/11/2012 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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People only care about privacy when something they don't want seen goes public. Only when people have something to be ashamed of, do they care. Twitter and Facebook proves this.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
People only care about privacy when something they don't want seen goes public. Only when people have something to be ashamed of, do they care. Twitter and Facebook proves this.


You knocked that right out of the Park.

Privacy rarely matters to people anymore.

Unless, it's their privacy.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


I agree.

There's a saying that "People hate lies and rumors told about them. They, however, hate it more when you tell the truth."



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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This is so underhanded - so potentially sinister - that I have to wonder what took so long.

But it DOES explain that guy on my porch in a banana hammock after I placed an order with Banana Republic.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
People only care about privacy when something they don't want seen goes public. Only when people have something to be ashamed of, do they care. Twitter and Facebook proves this.


Oh BS...

What about personal information regarding youngsters? You do know that there are predators on line right?

What about information that might lead to identity theft?

What about personal information regarding your financial status?

Please go back and re-think your statement above..... pretty narrow minded if you ask me.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by XPLodER
the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


xploder
edit on 11-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)


More BS....

The internet is NOT Public Domain. You and I have a reasonable expectation of privacy whether online or not.

Where are you people getting this stuff?

What "ruling" are you refering too?
edit on 12-12-2012 by Blarneystoner because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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Originally posted by Blarneystoner

Originally posted by XPLodER
the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


xploder
edit on 11-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)



More BS....


your welcome to your opinion
however misguided

The internet is NOT Public Domain. You and I have a reasonable expectation of privacy whether online or not.

Where are you people getting this stuff?


Under current law, to establish a reasonable expectation of privacy a person must establish two things: that the individual had a subjective expectation of privacy; and that that subjective expectation of privacy is one that society is prepared to recognize as reasonable.[1] If either element is missing, no protected interest is established.
To support this privacy analysis, the Supreme Court has created a hierarchy of privacy interests:

First, expectations of privacy that "society is 'prepared to recognize as legitimate' have, at least in theory, the greatest protection.[2]
Second, diminished expectations of privacy are more easily invaded.[3]
Third, subjective expectations of privacy that society is not prepared to recognize as legitimate have no protection.[4]


itlaw.wikia.com...
first answer on google search
diminished expectations of privacy are more easily invaded


What "ruling" are you refering too?
edit on 12-12-2012 by Blarneystoner because: (no reason given)



once you understand that you have no expectation of privacy from advertisers trackers,
and they are allowed to cross correlate your information to deduce more facts about you from your data,
these third parties have no obligation to keep your info private.

therefore your info is available "to the public" therefore "publicly acessable" therefore public

this means you cant, (if properly informed) say you thought it was private comunications,
"stored" email is a different issue



how else can advertisers get away with this sort of behaviour ?

arstechnica.com...

how can you expect to have privacy if advertisers can watch your screen?

really how?

xploder



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
People only care about privacy when something they don't want seen goes public. Only when people have something to be ashamed of, do they care. Twitter and Facebook proves this.



Oh yeah, totally.


So i guess you wouldn't mind me coming to your home and going through your stuff, then, right?

Nothing to hide and all? Only those who are hiding something, or ashamed or embarrassed desire privacy?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


How does your response support your initial claim?



the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


Nothing in your response vaildates the statement: "you have no claim to "privacy".



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by Blarneystoner
reply to post by XPLodER
 


How does your response support your initial claim?



the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


Nothing in your response vaildates the statement: "you have no claim to "privacy".



let me do some more homework for you then,
on phone convosations,

Thus, some Supreme Court cases have held that you have no reasonable expectation of privacy in information you have "knowingly exposed" to a third party — for example, bank records or records of telephone numbers you have dialed — even if you intended for that third party to keep the information secret. In other words, by engaging in transactions with your bank or communicating phone numbers to your phone company for the purpose of connecting a call, you’ve "assumed the risk" that they will share that information with the government.


ssd.eff.org...

in chat rooms,

Chat rooms became a very common communication means, event at a corporate level. Just as e-mails, public chat rooms communications are recoverable and can be used in criminal court proceedings. People who have been indicted for commission of Internet crimes or other crimes whose evidence is found in chat rooms have unsuccessfully tried to suppress the evidence gathered in chat rooms. For instance, one of the most common arguments for suppression of this evidence is the violation of the First Amendment right or freedom of speech, violation of due process, and unlawful searches and seizures. Most of these arguments are proven unsuccessful. Courts have reiterated that there is no expectation of privacy in chat room communications and that there is no freedom of speech when the speech constitutes the commission of an offense.


www.ibls.com...

records stored by third parties,
this may include ISP, web sights, email provider (but not emails) messengers, voip, financial transactions,
facebook Ats and ect.


Records stored by others. As the Supreme Court has stated, "The Fourth Amendment does not prohibit the obtaining of information revealed to a third party and conveyed by him to Government authorities, even if the information is revealed on the assumption that it will be used only for a limited purpose and the confidence placed in the third party will not be betrayed." This means that you will often have no Fourth Amendment protection in the records that others keep about you, because most information that a third party will have about you was either given freely to them by you, thus knowingly exposed, or was collected from other, public sources. It doesn’t necessarily matter if you thought you were handing over the information in confidence, or if you thought the information was only going to be used for a particular purpose.


ssd.eff.org...

i could list them all but,
the third party can share subscriber info,

xploder



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Blarneystoner
 


oh here is the cherry on the cake,
on how miss informed your opinion is,


“Anonymous” tracking now includes knowing your name, email address and everything about you — just not your full browsing history


which can be gleaned from "other" advertisers that track your clicks,
combine that with the mouse "keylogger" and you soon realise that "every move you make is public"



Companies tracking your identity and other personal information online are redefining what “anonymous” means.

Now, according to an investigation into tracking practices by the WSJ (subscription required), advertisers’ definition of the word “anonymous” includes: “We know your real name and email address and everything about you except your full browsing history.”

Take the example of Dataium LLC, a Kentucky tracking company that targets car shoppers. Dataium first grabs name and contact information from shoppers when they fill out Website forms on any of some 4,000-plus car dealers Dataium partners with. Dataium then performs an analysis on a customers’ web browsing history, and provides that analysis to the dealer. And so when the customer comes in to the dealership to look at cars, “I know now how to approach” him, the WSJ quotes Dataium co-founder Jason Ezell as having boasted to a car-dealer conference last year.

Bizarrely, Dataium still argues that a shoppers’ Web browsing is anonymous, even though it can be tied to their names. Dataium apparently adheres to the strict definition of anonymous: Dataium says it does not give dealers click-by-click details of people’s Web surfing history.

See the difference? It knows everything about you, including the specific cars you’ve been researching, and other interests. But it’s not passing on click-by-click details. Huge difference, right?


venturebeat.com... -history/

feel like you have privacy?
really?

xploder
edit on 12-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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I'd just like to know what site resulted in me constantly receiving emails regarding my WoW and Diablo III accounts.

Especially given I don't have, and have never had, an account for either game.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


I wouldn't care so much what people knew about me as long as it wasn't personal information. I don't want every blackmailing, con artist, to scam me out of everything because they had access to SSN,DL#, address full name etc.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by VeritasAequitas
reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


I wouldn't care so much what people knew about me as long as it wasn't personal information. I don't want every blackmailing, con artist, to scam me out of everything because they had access to SSN,DL#, address full name etc.


well if the advertisers can get your email address,
and email hosts are third parties,
well then that is not "private" either

sorry

xploder
edit on 12-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-12-2012 by XPLodER because: spelling



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 

I'm well aware of the abilty for companies to gather information and track usage. However, there is legislation which provides protection from exploitation and and disemination of personal information on the internet.


Sarbanes-Oxley Act, HIPAA and GLBA all contain at least some guarantee of an individual’s right not to have their personal or confidential information exposed. These regulations mandate that companies take steps to ensure their customer’s data is secure and impose fines and penalties on companies that fail to do so.


I'm not talking about information that is freely given to a "trusted" company, I'm talking about confidential information like banking records, medical records, minors addess information , etc... That type of inforation IS protected and everyone has a reasonable expectation of privacy with regards to that.

You've made the assumption that I'm talking about personal information that is freely relinquished. That assumption is not correct.
edit on 12-12-2012 by Blarneystoner because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by Blarneystoner

Originally posted by XPLodER
the internet is now considered a public place, as such you have no claim to "privacy"
this means there is no reasonable expectation that no one is stalking you around the net.

this ruling is what makes it "legal" to collect information on all peoples. (for advertising purposes)


xploder
edit on 11-12-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)


More BS....

The internet is NOT Public Domain. You and I have a reasonable expectation of privacy whether online or not.

Where are you people getting this stuff?

What "ruling" are you refering too?
edit on 12-12-2012 by Blarneystoner because: (no reason given)


same place these people heard that the local mall is a public space and not the private property it actually is...

if I give my personal information to Ebay, they have no right to share that info with anyone. if I wanted Walmart to have my info, I would give it to them myself...

the sad reality, is somewhere in those agreement popups that people 'ok', there is most likely some paragraph that tells you that your information is being shared.... unfortunately due to the fact that they spam those agreements with so much legalese, that most people just skip over all the words and click 'I Agree'





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