Awesome pic of darkside of the moon....

page: 1
2

log in

join

posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 03:33 AM
link   
I was looking around for a picture of the darkside of the moon and found this, the most detailed picture that had been taken (until 21 March 2011 anyway).

Just thought i'd chuck it up for interests sake, as i didn't find it straight away, i still think it's a very interesting subject... Who really knows what lurks up there?

Enjoy!
www.space.com...




posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 03:41 AM
link   
Nice.

But my question is ... Where are images of the Transformers?

The image of the crashed spaceship....

And don't try and tell me that Hollywood is all made up



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 03:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Skinon
 


Awesome pics!
Inaccurate title however, there is no 'Dark side of the moon'



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 03:48 AM
link   
reply to post by waveydavey
 


Far-side of the moon? I wonder how edited this image is?

Any photography buffs able to shed any light or have other images of the farside of the moon?



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 03:49 AM
link   
reply to post by Skinon
 


thats pretty cool thanks



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 04:01 AM
link   
Sure it is. If it's the dark side of the moon then how come it's all lit up?

Did they forget to turn off the set lights again?


Typical NASA.. I'd hate to be one of the poor fools who falls for this. Must feel pretty stupid to think that's real.




*shoots self in eye*



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 04:10 AM
link   
Breathe...breathe in the air




Don't be afraid to care



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 04:10 AM
link   
It's actually astounding that NASA only seem to recently have taken an interest in Lunar Transient Phenomena and whislt doing so; noticed that they are caused by regular meteor strikes occuring on the Moon.

A recent strike was estimated to generate 17 Billion Joules of Kinetic Energy (or equivalent to 4 tons of TNT) and most of these are completely unexpected.
science.nasa.gov...

Maybe a Moon expert can explain but looking at the available data: www.nasa.gov... on lunar impacts this seems to be spread all over the Moon.

How did NASA ensure none of these impacts would occur near the areas visited by the Astronauts if they werent even properly monitoring impacts pre 1980???

I understand not every impact would be a "killer" to an Astronaut on the moon but it does seem particularily given the apparent frequency

edit on 11-12-2012 by Jukiodone because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 05:07 AM
link   
reply to post by Hawking
 


And when the band your in starts playin' different tunes ...

I'll see you there.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 11:16 AM
link   
Go to the below website. Plenty of good moon images.
LINK



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:43 AM
link   
reply to post by hp1229
 


Hey cheers, awesome site!



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by Skinon
reply to post by hp1229
 
Hey cheers, awesome site!
Not a problem. I believe many of the folks on the website are/were ATS members
Nevertheless, it has lot of information to read and see. Enjoy



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 01:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Skinon
 





Far-side of the moon? I wonder how edited this image is?

Any photography buffs able to shed any light or have other images of the farside of the moon?


The WAC has filters, in the visible, or 'white light' range. However, there are many materials on the surface whos atoms emit 'light' at visible wavelengths when irradiated with UV or X-ray energies from the Sun. The filters have a 'bandwidth', a narrow bandwidth will only let the light from one targeted wavelength through, and then the ultra-sensitive image sensors amplify the hell out of that signal and feed it to the processing electronics. The light level is so low that if you were out where the camera was, you would see nothing. All earlier attempts to image the far side of the Moon with the very best cameras and fastest lenses failed miserably, and the announcement that they were to send a 3 tube Westinghouse colour video camera with an f/0.7 lens to take images of the far side was quietly let drop from the news, as the camera saw nothing.
All previous farside 'images' were constructed from UV and IR specroscopic images and a laser altimeter. Any combination of 3 wavelenghts, say 2 IR and one UV, is classed now as a 'colour' image, even though you can not see IR or UV light. NASA has never given us straight answers, why would anyone think they have turned a new leaf? When NASA says images, it is a very loose use of the word.



posted on Dec, 23 2012 @ 05:21 PM
link   
reply to post by GaryN
 


Ah interesting.... Wouldn't they be able to take the pictures whilst the moon has its 'back' to the sun? Or am i missing something...





new topics
 
2

log in

join