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Iowa, & Other States, Pay White People To Adopt Black People, Because They're Black

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posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

It's a very simple matter to take good quality photos of the paperwork and then use practically any photo editing program on the planet to redact out privacy concerning information with xxxx's, black lines, white lines red lines, or any color lines you want, even rainbows.


Thus, with that, seeing such paperwork, appropriately redacted for your own as well as the children's privacy, would certainly help in establishing the validity of your claim.

Thank you.
It's an interesting thing you've brought up if true and begs many questions.

Heck, he doesn't even need to go to that much trouble if he doesn't want to use photo editing software. He could just cover the sensitive information with physical objects. Cut out some narrow strips of paper or cardboard and place them over the lines that contain sensitive information, then take a photo.

Great thread by the way. It's hard to believe it's almost 2013 and we're still seeing human beings divided and categorized like goddamn farm animals. Some things never change.
edit on 11-12-2012 by Xaphan because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 


I wouldn't beat yourself up over it.

If you weren't receiving the incentive pay, someone else would be. You seem to be putting it to it's proper use, trying to take care of those kids. Who knows what somebody else might have done with it.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by watchitburn
 


People who are willing to give these kids a chance, should have a "stipend", and many tax breaks also.

It cost the state a heck of a lot more to house these poor kids who are in situations certainly not of their own doing.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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As a resident of Iowa, I can tell you that the "real" parents of these children are pressed hard for money to pay for the money needed to pay for these "services".

So don't feel bad. Thanks for caring for these kids when their real parents failed.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 08:35 PM
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If a child is adopted out of foster care, there is a stipend for them until they turn 18 or graduate from HS, whichever comes first. There are three rates. The lowest rate, which is approximately $500.00 and is for the easiest to adopt child. The next rate is around $720.00 for the harder to parent child. The highest rate is $900.00ish. This rate is for the most difficult to parent children. They come up with these amounts based on behaviors of the child. They go through a lot of testing.

We adopted our daughter out of foster care. She had been in the system for over five years. She was fetal alcohol affected and had learning problems. This money in no way was intended for us to live on or get rich. I never even expected to receive money after the adoption was completed. I saved it for her college and it paid for her horses, music lessons and braces. I gave up a full time job to be a parent to her. I was stressed out a lot with her behaviors. We had several counselors over the years too.

If there is a stipend just because of the child's skin color, then maybe it is because the state is desperate for people to parent these kids. Nobody is getting rich off of stipends.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by hardamber
 


If I may, as long as we're talking about kids who probably don't stand a chance, and what becomes of them --
Does anyone have any personal experiences of children who are in foster care, turn 18, and what becomes of them?

I see them at the end of the line, at the state mental hospital (WI), surely there are some good, hopeful stories out there....



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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My daughter was a level two in difficulty with three being the maximum. She is going to turn 19 in nine days and she'd doing great. I home schooled her the last two years of high school and she was able to dual enroll in college her senior year. She has a job at a horse farm and loves taking care of the animals.

She was a huge challenge because it was hard to love our family. She has four older sisters who lived with their aunt and uncle. It made her very slow to mature, but finally this last year she has finally improved by light years. What really helped was that she was always allowed to be in contact with her birth family. She is very close to her sisters. The parents never kept in touch with any of them. Finally she got her dad's phone number and called him. It seemed to make a difference in her soul. I was so glad she talked with him.

I know other people who did adopt four boys with lots of needs. The oldest one graduated a couple years ago and is doing well. His grandparents had him all the time when he was little so that saved him. The next one is in a group home. He was always going to end up in one. Unfortunately, some of these kids are so mentally damaged there is not much that can be done for them to have a normal life. That boy has fetal alcohol syndrome and an attachment disorder. He is dangerous and unpredictable. The third youngest has fetal alcohol syndrome too, but is not dangerous. He reminds me of Dopey from Snow White. He is adorable, but just not all there. The last one seemed to be the most normal of the bunch. They got him when he was a baby. I don't think he has FAS. Their adopted mom did give up a full time job to raise them. There is no way she could have worked and taken care of them. I think she got the equivalent of 40K a year because the income is not taxed. The children also have state paid insurance.

I got to know another family that only took in teenage girls. They looked like they had a lot of fun together. I used to take them to the beach and they'd come over here and play volleyball. I also used to take one of them to visit her family down at the center. These kids come across as just wanting to have a normal life and be a part of a family. None of the girls she had were special needs. Just kids that needed a home.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by hardamber
 


May God bless all of you.





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