True, clouds of psychochemicals that temporarily incapacitate the mind

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posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 04:55 PM
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“This shall be the story of the fall of a human soul—a fall which is great,” Ketchum wrote when he was a freshman at Dartmouth, working on a play.


Colonel James S. Ketchum dreamed of war without killing. He joined the Army in 1956 and left it in 1976, and in that time he did not fight in Vietnam; he did not invade the Bay of Pigs; he did not guard Western Europe with tanks, or help build nuclear launch sites beneath the Arctic ice. Instead, he became the military’s leading expert in a secret Cold War experiment: to fight enemies with clouds of psychochemicals that temporarily incapacitate the mind—causing, in the words of one ranking officer, a “selective malfunctioning of the human machine.” For nearly a decade, Ketchum, a psychiatrist, went about his work in the belief that chemicals are more humane instruments of warfare than bullets and shrapnel—or, at least, he told himself such things. To achieve his dream, he worked tirelessly at a secluded Army research facility, testing chemical weapons on hundreds of healthy soldiers, and thinking all along that he was doing good.

Source: www.newyorker.com...

As this long story unfolds, you'll learn the ideal chemical weapon for the military has these characteristics: seizures, dizziness, fear, panic, hysteria, hallucinations, migraine, delirium, extreme depression, notions of hopelessness, lack of initiative to do even simple things, suicidal mania.

Interestingly:


The psychochemical-warfare program was a small part of the over-all research, and in many respects it was the strangest. Once, Ketchum walked into his office and found a barrel the size of an oil drum standing in a corner. No one explained why it was in his office, or who had put it there. After a couple of days, he waited until evening and opened it. Inside, he found dozens of small glass vials, each containing a precisely measured amount of pure '___'; he figured there was enough to make several hundred million people go bonkers—and later calculated the street value of the barrel to be roughly a billion dollars. At the end of the week, the barrel vanished just as mysteriously as it had appeared. No one spoke about it. He never learned what it was for.


I wonder where that barrel went...


For years, Sim had been overseeing secret intelligence experiments at Edgewood. At one point, he did research for the C.I.A. on a BZ-type drug, called the Boomer, that causes delirium for as long as two weeks. The agency wanted to know if it could be administered through the skin. Could a Soviet agent brush some on silverware at a diplomatic party and cause an American official to go crazy? Could an operative dose an adversary with a handshake? Sim initiated trials at the arsenal and at Holmesburg Prison, in Pennsylvania, with which Edgewood had contracted to conduct experiments on inmates.


I urge anyone interested in this subject to read the full article - there are plenty of eye openers contained within. One last thought, and because this is ATS, do you think these experiments stopped? Do you think the CIA or Russia intelligence isn't still using chemical weapons or '___'-derivatives on certain targets? Didn't the Serbia NATO envoy just happily jump off a garage to his death.

And I'll leave you with this paragraph - notice the Army tested on a large scale indiscriminately to unsuspecting victims.


He often gave '___' to people without warning. Not long after arriving at Edgewood, Ketchum took to playing tennis with a commanding officer at the arsenal, who, after a match one day, described how Sim had spiked his morning coffee with '___'. “He was pissed off as hell,” Ketchum told me. '___' had been mixed into cocktails at a party, and into an Army unit’s water supply. Some men handled it fine; some went berserk. A test subject in 1957 exhibited “euphoria followed by severe depression, anxiety, and panic—feeling he was going to die,” according to his chart. Another test involved intelligence specialists who were blindfolded and placed in an isolation chamber. “Only one subject was in a condition to undergo extended interrogation,” a report concluded. “A second subject fled from interrogation in panic.”

Source again: www.newyorker.com...

Lastly, for the folks positive that something reality-altering will occur on December 21, 2012 - a cloud of psychochemicals will do the trick.

This is not fiction, folks. Not at all.

edit on 10-12-2012 by Jason88 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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One more addition to show the lengths the Army went through to test its psychological warfare drugs; sounds almost too far fetched to be true. But the crazier it is, maybe its th most plausible in these situations thereby tossing Occam's Razor out the _


In May, 1962, while testing BZ’s effect on soldier performance, Ketchum oversaw the construction of an entire Hollywood-style set in the form of a makeshift communications outpost. The plan was to confine four soldiers to the outpost for three days. Except for one man, who would be given a placebo, the soldiers would be administered varying doses of BZ. Then, as if in a scene from the TV show “Lost,” they would be radioed a stream of commands and messages, based on a fictional scenario.



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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Hmmm well this beats being nuked I suppose



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 


The physical transport mechanism is dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for skin or mucous membrane transfer. The NATO dignitary may have had a substance transfered from a pen, a doorhandle, briefcase, laptop, etc. You simply mix the material to be transfered with DMSO and obtain skin contact. DMSO (non-medical grade) is used as an agent to transfer nutrients into plant cells. Medical grade is used in nicotine patches I believe.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 





For years, Sim had been overseeing secret intelligence experiments at Edgewood. At one point, he did research for the C.I.A. on a BZ-type drug, called the Boomer, that causes delirium for as long as two weeks. The agency wanted to know if it could be administered through the skin. Could a Soviet agent brush some on silverware at a diplomatic party and cause an American official to go crazy? Could an operative dose an adversary with a handshake? Sim initiated trials at the arsenal and at Holmesburg Prison, in Pennsylvania, with which Edgewood had contracted to conduct experiments on inmates.


Just reading your thread, and enthralled. Having said that, stopped here, just to let you know there are, indeed, chemicals readily available to anyone, and I won't name them, that allow osmosis type passage of substances through contact.



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by bobs_uruncle
 


Oh, nm. see someone beat me to it. I wasn't going to name it, tho, as i wouldn't give the ingredients of the bomb structure, either. Not being, critical here, just saying. Teach me to read before reply, anyway.
edit on 10-12-2012 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by Jason88
 





One more addition to show the lengths the Army went through to test its psychological warfare drugs; sounds almost too far fetched to be true. But the crazier it is, maybe its th most plausible in these situations thereby tossing Occam's Razor out the _


Ah, but here, here. Yes, many such happenings absolutely, do, in fact, seem to do just that to Occam's Razor, to the point, one begins to wonder if Occam didn't provide the razor just for the truth to be split and discarded as just so much flotsam and jetsam.

This whole thread puts me in mind of the doctor, one of many who "suicided," supposedly, after being dosed with '___', Dr. Olson. Recent developments as to that case, as well. And the cinematic supposition of Jacob's ladder, which may or may not be so suppositional and fictional. A better soldier, a way of control, with no traceable evidence. And perhaps, no one left to tell the story, either.

And, here would be Olson's story, via Wiki.
edit on 10-12-2012 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 12:19 AM
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Originally posted by tetra50
reply to post by bobs_uruncle
 


Oh, nm. see someone beat me to it. I wasn't going to name it, tho, as i wouldn't give the ingredients of the bomb structure, either. Not being, critical here, just saying. Teach me to read before reply, anyway.
edit on 10-12-2012 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)


DMSO is pretty common knowledge and not really that hard to come by. It can also be used with food and ingested to get nutrients into the body's cells faster. As far as the "medicinal" components refered to in this thread, '___' although workable as a psychotropic pales in comparison to compounds like dimethyltryptamine and scopalamine (in my opnion anyway). With the "wrong" mindset and dosed properly, dimethyltryptamine can produce horrors beyond your imagination, but it can also breakdown what we perceive to be the barriers of reality, so a double edged sword if you will. I would strongly suggest not playing with any of these compounds.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 02:56 AM
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I'm still waiting for the Gay Bomb.

Whatever happened to the Gay Bomb?

That was a brilliant idea. Everyone just starts fornicating with each other, and since most soldiers are boys, well, Gay Bomb.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

I'm still waiting for the Gay Bomb.

Whatever happened to the Gay Bomb?

That was a brilliant idea. Everyone just starts fornicating with each other, and since most soldiers are boys, well, Gay Bomb.




The wicked lisping overlords of the Gay Agenda have stolen the technology. They are waiting for the next Super Bowl in Cowboys Stadium. Whoo hooo! Can you imagine the Par-tay!?

But more seriously, if your enemies get their testosterone spiked and laid all the time, what happens to their morale? You betcha!

Maybe they should use it on the friendly troops. The Greeks could kick some serious Bronze Age persian.

edit on 11-12-2012 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-12-2012 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-12-2012 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)






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