Homeless banker hits rock bottom

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posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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People who are well to do should Live Homeless for a few weeks to get a taste of what most Americans Go Through and I bet they would be more than willing to Donate some of their wealth, You have to Live it to Understand it.




posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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I understand there is a lot of jubilation over an investment banker losing everything. Rejoicing over the fall of an "enemy" is a powerful emotion. But beyond that I have a few questions.

Is he an "enemy" because all investment bankers are the enemy? All of them?

Is it because he had money? Are all those with wealth the enemy? Remember, Obama is a multi-millionaire.

Is it because he broke a law? There's no reason to suppose he did.

And why aren't you gleeful over the other wealthy person discussed in the brief source article? His home, when he had it, was worth half a million pounds. Is it because he is an engineer?

So, sure, go ahead and celebrate. I won't ask you for your reason why.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by ollncasino
 


Yes, It would be unkind. Messed up as today's economic system maybe, it is not any articular banker's fault( maybe excluding some at the really high up levels) as human being we should be happy for others in their success and feel sorry for their fall.

even if in his work, he caused other to loose money, did he do it on purpose? he was taught and guided to preform certain tasks, he did not create the debt economy we live in now, he is just operating within the rules of the game. it is the game that is messed up, not the banker



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Negative. The "small guys" are as much to blame as TPTB. They may not have created the system, but they perpetuated it and in most cases made it worse with their various scams and dodges. Even those who have accepted credit in its many and complicated forms are guilty.

Participation in the finance game makes you as guilty as those who established it. Think about the ramifications of that statement for a moment and then reflect on how many ways "they" are intent on seeing the people get into debt - car finance, mortgages, credit cards, even cell phone plans... all done through media, social pressure, etc.

Opt out of the game. Live within your means. Only then will you be in a position to criticise the guilty. I criticise them guilt-free, but it cost me several years, a career and a marriage to get to this point. Most aren't willing to pay the price for freedom from the oppression of debt.

Debt is NOT a viable financial plan.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by nottelling
 





Participation in the finance game makes you as guilty as those who established it


The man was played along with everyone else. He was trying to make a living just like everyone else. The fact he made his money working with money means nothing. If participation in the finance game makes you guilty does that make all the people that have lost their homes through mortgage repayments guilty as well. Or anyone else trying to save money in a banking system or a financial trust.

Its easy to point fingers and blame these people, they are easy targets and scape goats. You want answers follow the money. He doesnt have it. Look at the trillions in off shore bank accounts
edit on 12-12-2012 by purplemer because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by purplemer
reply to post by nottelling
 


If participation in the finance game makes you guilty does that make all the people that have lost their homes through mortgage repayments guilty as well. Or anyone else trying to save money in a banking system or a financial trust.


Precisely.

The game has been rigged and nothing will ever change. Humanity has been trapped into supporting the "system".

A few people such as myself can and do carve out a good life without reliance upon credit/debt, but to think that we as a civilisation could eliminate it completely at this point of time is unrealistic. After the fall of our civilisation, perhaps those who rebuild will learn from our mistakes, but 5 or 6 generations later, someone will come up with a way to "game" the rest of their fellow human beings in an attempt to hoard wealth/resources/painted shells/whatever. Then it will start all over again - it's hardwired into us.

Despite this, I'm glad the "little fish" in the original post is having such a character-building experience. Can't wait for the bestselling novel or the self-help book - "How I clawed my way back from bankruptcy and how you can too by making just a few smart investment decisions with your unemployment payments..."
edit on 12-12-2012 by nottelling because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-12-2012 by nottelling because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 08:33 PM
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I am utterly amazed at the sheer lack of human empathy and compassion towards one's fellow man. Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.

Good grief. Most bankers are good people who work hard every day, and spent years of their life climbing the corporate ladder like any other industry. To cast an entire industry with millions upon millions of workers in a bad light is simply naive and erroneous.

These people are not the crooks, folks. The real crooks are behind the scenes, manipulating the entire economy from a far distance from the spotlight. The top of the pyramid is not a work-a-day Joe investment banker trying to earn a living for himself.

The whole point behind this collapse is to usher in a world economic system, with a single world currency, and a micro-chipped population. This is the agenda, and it would have happened regardless of whether these now homeless investment bankers ever worked a day in their lives. This is the agenda, and they are victims of a system that spit them out and threw their lives away.

May we wish these homeless people peace, a new job opportunity, a roof over their heads, and food in their stomach as we enter the New Year. May the good Lord watch over them and protect them during this tremendously difficult time.

They need our prayers, and our support, not our condemnation.

The crass, inhumane, and degrading comments towards these homeless people are nothing short of appalling. Good grief.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by CookieMonster09
Good grief. Most bankers are good people who work hard every day, and spent years of their life climbing the corporate ladder like any other industry. To cast an entire industry with millions upon millions of workers in a bad light is simply naive and erroneous.

These people are not the crooks, folks. The real crooks are behind the scenes, manipulating the entire economy from a far distance from the spotlight. The top of the pyramid is not a work-a-day Joe investment banker trying to earn a living for himself.


A clear case of wrong-thinking.

These people at all levels, from the CEO to the local branch manager, to the little person at the counter or the minimum wage person manning the support and customer service lines are all part of the mechanism through which TPTB seek to control us. Of course some, like the scumbag in question in the original post are more ruthlessly ambitious than others. Someone becomes an investment banker not to "pay the bills" but to "get me a big slice of dat pie". They perpetuate the problem through their participation in it, knowing full-well that in the current financial paradigm, there can be no winners unless someone else loses out.

How can one's quality of life be determined by the scarcity propaganda surrounding 1s and 0s which are literally created on a whim? People live or die depending upon how many 1s and 0s they have gathered. That's what's appalling. What sort of a monster supports such a system? They do and it sounds like you do. Brainwashed or not, that makes you a part of the problem. Hit me with some more pro-bankster's-minion propaganda.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:19 PM
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I'm sure before he went bust he wasn't thinking about me being rock bottom.. No sympathy here and I hope the rest of them fall also.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by CookieMonster09
 


There are people going through worse than him. I really couldn't care less what hes been through.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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A clear case of wrong-thinking.


Yes, compassion and empathy for the homeless is so out of fashion these days. Good grief.



These people at all levels, from the CEO to the local branch manager, to the little person at the counter or the minimum wage person manning the support and customer service lines are all part of the mechanism through which TPTB seek to control us.

Who died and made you king?

What makes you think you have the reasoning capacity to judge others?



What sort of a monster supports such a system? They do and it sounds like you do. Brainwashed or not, that makes you a part of the problem. Hit me with some more pro-bankster's-minion propaganda.


Doubtful. Compassion knows no bounds, regardless of one's past mistakes or decisions.

A person who is homeless should never be degraded. You are pretty arrogant to speak in such a degrading and arrogant tone towards others.



I'm sure before he went bust he wasn't thinking about me being rock bottom.. No sympathy here and I hope the rest of them fall also.....There are people going through worse than him. I really couldn't care less what hes been through.


Speaks volumes about your lack of compassion for your fellow humanity. I guess poking fun at the homeless is an admirable trait in your book. Nice.

Who cares if this person was a janitor, or a CEO? This person is a human being that is now homeless.

Instead of degrading the homeless, we should be supporting their efforts to rebuild their life, help them to put a roof over their heads, and pray for their well-being.

We shouldn't be passing judgment on others - We have no indications in this article, aside from a job title, as to the character of the individual in question. You are making a big mistake by casting snap judgments based simply on someone's past job title. Who are you to judge?



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by CookieMonster09
 


Great philosophy.. Lets band all our money together and start rebuilding African nations where people are really doing it tough, are homeless pretty much all their lives and don't seem to care about it, haven't got or had a decent meal for years even though this guy likely still does.

Again, people are doing it tougher than this dude ever will even if he was homeless for a short amount of time. I love how the sob story of an ex banker makes the news and we all must feel compassion, sorry in an instant yet if the same issue was brought up about a person who has been homeless all his life, they wouldn't look at the story twice. Sorry, I stand by my opinion whether you think I care about others or not. If I could wave a wand and make the world perfect, I would.
edit on 12-12-2012 by DarknStormy because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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Great philosophy.. Lets band all our money together and start rebuilding African nations where people are really doing it tough, are homeless pretty much all their lives and don't seem to care about it, haven't got or had a decent meal for years even though this guy likely still does.


Oh yes, it's so utterly important that we only have sympathy for the most extreme type of homelessness. We can't possibly be sympathetic to people that are homeless for any shorter periods of time than their entire lives. Goodness forbid.



posted on Dec, 12 2012 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by CookieMonster09
Oh yes, it's so utterly important that we only have sympathy for the most extreme type of homelessness. We can't possibly be sympathetic to people that are homeless for any shorter periods of time than their entire lives. Goodness forbid.


What would you know? Have you been homeless or been left to squat because you can't afford rent? Have you struggled to provide yourself with a meal on a day to day basis without the help of charities or organisations because they simply aren't available to you? I have and I don't need your sympathy, empathy or any other emotion.

edit on 12-12-2012 by DarknStormy because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by Snoil
I hope that he gets enough hot meals to stay healthy and eventually rights his own ship. I wish him no ill (unlike some rejoincing previous to my post). I don't wish poverty on anyone.


You said it, Snoil. Vaneigem likes write about the dictatorship of markets and their stewards, how the banks are standing at the frontier of the social crisis, and I do agree with him. I read the article and felt sorry for this guy, and all the other people who had lost their homes. Having everything that you have built fall apart in front of you, having your home taken away from you and your family desert you, I just wouldn't wish it on anyone.



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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Maybe like along the lines of Scrooge he's one of the lucky ones being shown the error of his ways and he'll come out a better man for it.



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 01:05 AM
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reply to post by korath
 


Maybe like along the lines of Scrooge he's one of the lucky ones being shown the error of his ways and he'll come out a better man for it.
What I don't understand about many of the posts is summed up in "the error of his ways." What was the error of his ways? Working in the financial industry is an error? What error? What did he do? Maybe that's where his aptitude and interests lay. Would you clarify this for me?



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 01:41 AM
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reply to post by CookieMonster09
 


It's clear you're an empath, so I understand your point of view and respect your opinion. I wish I could be just like you and be understanding, empathetic, practice forgiveness, etc. ...



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 02:02 AM
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Whats this have to do with forgiveness? The guy has never betrayed any of us. He met the short end of the stick, will get his life back on track and move on. Wish I could say the same for others who do not have the life experience this guy does..



posted on Dec, 13 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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Originally posted by DarknStormy
Whats this have to do with forgiveness? The guy has never betrayed any of us. He met the short end of the stick, will get his life back on track and move on. Wish I could say the same for others who do not have the life experience this guy does..


Stockholm Syndrome is amusing to watch.



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