True Cold Weather Advice

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posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Bah humbug...

We just turn them into pets.




posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:30 PM
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I always carry a balaclava that has a nose cover and a small pair of ski goggles. The combination leaves no bare flesh exposed which is ideal for sleeping since you can't bury your head in your sleeping bag (builds up moisture from your breath). The goggles are great also for keeping smoke from the fire out of your eyes when you are trying to sleep. They also keep snow blindness at bay on sunny days and keeps the snow from blasting your eyes in strong winds.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:31 PM
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Look, wool is awesome, but it's heavy. If you have to lug around a 25lb hunting pack on snowshoes (even high quality ones from MRS) -- you're going to exert more "energy" lugging that crap around. You're going to sweat more and require more water. You do know that eating snow is a bad idea, right?

As I have said before, look to the mountaineers. These are the people at the "bleeding edge" of outdoor wear. We don't have to spend as much -- but we can take some lessons. They climb in extreme environments, not unlike an astronaut. Sometimes I feel like I live in space here.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:31 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
Or you could do what I do.
Don't live in a place where you can die if you get stuck outdoors. I did for a while and decided I didn't want to do that anymore.


Same here.
If you live somewhere that if you are left without shelter and will soon die,coconuts and palm trees are better.
I'm somewhere in the middle and working my way towards total outdoor comfort.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by Phage------->First you catch hypothermia then you get eaten.


Just don't fall asleep dead drunk and you'll be just fine, oh and don't forget the gun.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Where's your sense of adventure ? There's nothing better than being bundled up and out walking on a clear starry night at -35c and the snow is squeaking when you walk on it !!



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by MystikMushroom
reply to post by Asktheanimals
 

I searched hard for the warmest synthetic sleeping bag -- apparently the NF has it. My bag might weigh 8 lbs, but it's good down to -30+


Check this out. Truly how a sleeping bag should be made.
IT Sleeping system



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


When it comes to warmth, I swear by a good quality polar fleece over wool any day. Polar fleece thermal undies, turtleneck, inner lining for mitts, toque, etc.

Not only is wool heavy, it constantly feels damp and takes forever to dry out.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by rick004
 

Unless its being in shorts and T-shirt walking on a clear starry night at 23º with waves gently lapping the beach (or roaring, depending on if there is a swell).

I understand this is actually a serious thread. I'll try to stay out of it now.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Canada? I'm from Alaska, beeotch please!

When it gets down to negative degrees, the air tends to become very dry. One has to remind themselves to drink water regularly. It's very easy to become dehydrated in a cold an arid environment.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by rick004
 

Unless its being in shorts and T-shirt walking on a clear starry night at 23º with waves gently lapping the beach (or roaring, depending on if there is a swell).

I understand this is actually a serious thread. I'll try to stay out of it now.


I think,personally,humor is always welcome.Breaks it up a little bit.
Just my opinion.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


There is definitely a difference ! Where I am it gets to -30c regularly in winter but its humid . I visit my brother in Manitoba and it gets to -30c but it doesn't feel as cold because its less humid , I've also been in northern Quebec quite often and it doesn't seem as cold out there ?



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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reply to post by rick004
 

So you can die of hypothermia but be more comfortable while doing so?
"It's not the cold. It's the humidity."

*must...stop...gloating.*



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Don't get me wrong , I go to Cuba every year to relax on the beach !! But at least when it's cold you can put on another sweater but when it's stinkin hot you're screwed !! Lol



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by rick004
 

Yeah. I agree with that. I hate that.
But you won't die from being uncomfortably warmish.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


Wow ! That bag is worth more than my jeep !! I have an old army sleeping bag that someone sewed in 2 wool blankets into , it's heavy as hell but warm and comfy !



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by rick004
 


Yeah, that's the drawback. Its an example of remarkable craftsmanship though. If you're not comfortable in it then you wont be comfortable in anything.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:23 PM
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if you wanan get protection from the cold from what i rember from my uncle telling me as a kid( uncle did trapping) and he says the best thing for keeping out water and keeping the heat in is beaver pelt as its evidenly impermeable? just figgured id throw it out there even though not that many people can or want to go get a full on beaver suit



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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When my wife and I lived in Alaska from 1970-1985 we invested in a Singer 29K industrial free arm treadle sewing machine to make some extra money. With it we replaced many heavy duty zippers in sleeping bags and parkas, reinforced tents, etc., for mountain climbers who made their way up MT. Denali. One of the things we often did was to connect heavy mittens with a strong strip of elastic. We made it long enough to reach from one cuff to the other with the persons arms fully extended. The climber would put the gloves with elastic strap on and then the gloves out through the arm sleeves. This way they could not accidentally lose a mitten. If you drop a mitten on top of Mt. Denali in a sixty mile an hour wind you are most likely going to die.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Well, actually you could die of heat prostration or heat stroke. This can happen when a person fails to keep properly hydrated or doesn't maintain proper salt intake.





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