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Lost civilization unearthed

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posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 

If this building was only partially completed, then that would explain why none of the locals have no stories about the temple in question. Perhaps the whole project was left un-finished before some disaster or other, thus explaining the stacked stones, and the remains of a temple.




posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by JabbaClease
 


I think that given the climate, buildings are quickly consumed by vegetation, and they are pillaged for their stone, but also, the kingdom collapsed in the 1500s according to this...


The arrival of the Hindu people marked the end of prehistoric period in Indonesia. The Hindu influence period was constituted from the first centuries AD until the fall of Majapahit Kingdom (around 1500 AD).

In the first century, a new religion, Hinduism, was introduced by Brahmin priests who traveled with Indian merchants in search of the fabulous wealth of these islands. Over the centuries, the kings of Bali adopted the new religion along with its offshoot, Buddhism. They blended it with elements of their old animist faith as they expanded their independent kingdoms.

In the end, all the kingdoms fell when the Majapahit's Gajah Mada expedition invaded and defeated Bali that marked the Ancient Balinese historical period between the 8th and the 14th century AD. Bali became an important province of Majapahit Empire. While Hindu and Buddhist spread out, the gradual fall of India to Islam broke direct contact between the Hindu motherland and Indonesia.


www.bali-directory.com...



edit on 8-12-2012 by KilgoreTrout because: kingdom, not empire



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by JabbaClease
 


The following is a bit more illuminating...


The temple of Bali are the legacy, in part, of an architectural tradition that dates back to the last great empire of Indonesia`s Hindu Buddhist past, namely the East Javanese kingdom of Majapahit, which at the height of its influence between the 14th and 15th centuries held sway over most of the Indonesian archipelago. Construction techniques employed by the ancient Javanese are still used today in Bali and many architectural elements-most notably the distinctive spit gateway, or candi bentar can be traced back to the golden Majapahit era. Majapahit and Bali Bali first came under the hegemony of Java in the latter part of the 13th century when the last ruler of Singasari, the dynasty which preceded Majapahit in East Java, sent a military expedition to subjugate the island in 1284. The subsequent fall of Singasari in 1292 temporarily released Bali from the thrall of East Java, but early in the 14th century, the new Majapahit rulers conducted a series of military campaigns against Bali which culminated in the installation of a Javanese king at Samprangan and the establishment of a Javanese ruling elite across the island. The end of the 15th century saw a gradual decline in Majapahit fortune as a autonomous Muslim entrepot state began to establish themselves along the northern coastline of Java. The final collapse of Majapahit came at the beginning of the 16th century and led to a huge influx of Javanese refugees into Bali, among them many artists and artisans who had formerly been employed at the Majapahit court. This event had a lasting impact on the religious and cultural life of the island and introduced new elements into Balinese temple architecture. Majapahit Correspondences The ruined temples of East Java reveal that the religious orientation of the Majapahit era was predominantly Hindu,but with a sizable Buddhist constituency. This same combination of Sivaitic Hinduism and Buddhism occurs in Bali except that the relationship between Hinduism and Buddhism is more syncretic in nature, with Hinduism grabbing the higher ground though itself greatly modified by native Balinese influences. Nevertheless a number of parallel with the Majapahit erw can still be drawn. For example, the Balinese continue to creamate their dead and cast their ashes upon the sea. And like the ancient Javanese they also conduct a series of post – mortem ritual to free the soul from the pollution of death. One major difference between modern Bali and Majapahit Java is the absence of a physical representation of the deity in Bali, except in the case of a few pre-Majapahit-era temples of great antiquity.


www.rasabali.com...

The influx of immigrants from Java would have changed the demographic and the significance of sacred sites would have been diminished.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 

Agreed. Still, gotta be a 'NatGeo' show in there somewhere. So much undiscoveded, so much unreported, so much ignored. Good to see this kind of news surfacing, leading to the eventual truth of mankind.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by SonsOfTheMeek
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Awesome! More evidence of Atlantis on the Sunda Shelf. It looks like Prof. Arysio Santos may have been right. Atlantis - The Lost Continent Finally Found


Atlantis was supposedly in the Atlantic.
Bali would have been a part of Lemuria.
edit on 8-12-2012 by RedmoonMWC because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by RedmoonMWC
Atlantis was supposedly in the Atlantic.
Bali would have been a part of Lemuria.



Or possibly MU.
I'd say this isn't that old. But I'm always open minded to other possibilities.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Interesting. I travelled to Fiji which is east of Bali in the Pacific and the local guide told me that it was commonly believed amongst his people that the Fijian Islands (there are 300 of them) were the mountain tops of an ancient civilization.

I also recently visited Siem Reap in Cambodia to see Ankor Wat and other ancient temples in the vicinity. They are still digging some of them out of metres of dirt (so far they have discovered 381 separate temple sites), and they know they were constructed circa 1000 AD and were abandoned for approximately 500 years when the [then] King decided to move the capital east to Phnom Penh. The name Siem Reap loosely translated means Sick of Being Pillaged by Thailand. My point is that it doesn't take long for stuff to get buried. Imagine how far down anything could be that was 1,000's of years old!



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by DerepentLEstranger
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


L
L

next time somebody get's snooty and asks "where is the evidence of a past advanced civilization"

i'll be replying "could be they're planting rice over it at the mo' maybe it wont be found for a few decades, when somebody decides to install a septic tank" and link here



The site is only 700 years old and consists of stones quarried and stacked up.

Yet you're willing to glom on to an "advanced ancient civilization" over this?

There's mounds of dirt in my area that are more than twice that old.

Talk about advanced. Piling dirt is one of the most advancedest things a civilization can do. At laeast rocks stay where they're put. Dirt piles tend to collapse.


Nevertheless, it's a cool find.

Harte



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 01:04 AM
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Originally posted by JabbaClease
I've just looked at this, and as a Builder(bricklayer specifically) of 25 years, I notice that the lines are not straight, and no builder would put something together as crooked as this; and so I come to the conclusion that all those stone there on display were stacked up ready for someone to lay them into a proper structure, that has not yet been revealed. This strikes me as the 'bricks canched up ready to lay'. There's more to this story than meets the eye.


this is quite possible.
thumbs up on that one.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 02:58 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
Or possibly MU.
I'd say this isn't that old. But I'm always open minded to other possibilities.



Yeah, according to Churchward's estimates this temple would be about 26,000 years too young


Besides, what Churchward recognised, amongst his more fanciful ideas, was that there was a common thread of Sun Worship amongst post-Neolithic peoples. He can be somewhat excused though for his rather glaring errors, he was working without the benefits of modern dating techniques and genetic evidence, and built upon the commonly held racist notions of the day. What we know today was almost unthinkable to many back then. I like his book though, The Lost Continent of Mu, he brought some very interesting information together and the illustrations in particular are quite useful, in my opinion.

Anyhoo...this temple that has been uncovered is Hindu I believe, and is therefore the progression onwards from Sun worship, so no relevence at all to 'Mu'.
edit on 9-12-2012 by KilgoreTrout because: excessive 'though'-ing



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 10:54 PM
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I don't know the laws in Bali over finds like this, but I hope they didn't dig their own grave...

What I mean by that is, I hope the Balinese government does not take the land on basis of a significant historic/archaeological site that needs to be properly studied and preserved.

I'ts the thing that came to my mind when I read this.





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