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Within ONE Year: Tens of Millions Will Eagerly And Willingly PAY To Relinquish Their Privacy

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posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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edit on 8-12-2012 by GreatScot because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by Hefficide
 


Heff? Buddy? Puddin? Didn't you vote for this? Didn't you ask for this political "agressiveness"?

Are the chickens coming home to roost?

Not to lay the blame at your feet only. I voted for Bush., I'm just as guilty.

The question is, what do we do to inhibit it?



LOL... Puddin'.




posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by Retikx
Yes the obvious potential for spying on everyone is there.

But you could always just unplug your system if you're worried about it looking at you when you're not playing...
edit on 8-12-2012 by Retikx because: (no reason given)


People think this about cell phones also. Short of removing the battery however you can be fooled into thinking its off. People used to keep thier computers unplugged when not in use but since broadband people leave there computers on for weeks at a time or even longer in some cases.

Wireless energy will be available in the agenda 21 sanctioned cities then the concept of unplugging wont even be feasible. Heff is right about the merging of Huxley and Orwell and even the lifted concepts in the Matrix films. However the Brave New World stuff will come about after the 1984 period of stamping out resistance. We know about these surveillance programs now because they want us to know. They want to distort and cause you to hate the current system so much you beg for a new one and that's what they are counting on.
edit on 8-12-2012 by NihilistSanta because: typo



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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I wouldn't be worried so much about games consoles, but I can easily see how the dependency on mobile phones and tablets can lead to what you're fearing.

It's not so much adults (30+), we've been around long enough to see things change, but kids who are growing up with this technology are becoming used to having their every movement tracked by their friends with social networking and GPS-enabled apps. There have been articles that raise concern about people who AREN'T social networking, as if they have something to hide - that is social conditioning if I ever saw it. And I can imagine that sense of social inclusion/exclusion is even stronger in the classroom.

Once this generation of children are adults who are completely used to being tracked all the time - what will the next generation after them get used to? Why have a phone at all when you can have a chip in your brain instead, that phone is so bulky! And you can bet that by this time - in 20-40 years time say, the truth about mobile phone usage and it's health risks will come out in much the same way that cigarettes became an evil - once TPTB have had their use of them and they're costing more than they're making, that's when the chip will be cooler than the phone.
edit on 8-12-2012 by VelvetSplash because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by electricalpup
My partner just today was telling me a co-worker heard at another truck terminal that their company is thinking of putting cameras inside of the truck and front bumper. He is so agitated. Apparently, a company has already tested this and has terminated the employment of a few people. I was going to research this for him to see where the money flows.

I am betting this is another form of taxpayer funded security BS.

The reason I bring this up,it is the young drivers that don't find a problem with this. They think it is OK

edit on 7-12-2012 by electricalpup because: Sorry, forgot part of response


Cameras are all over the workplace nowadays. The employers watch them from their home computer. I'm sure its nothing more than them just wanting to keep an eye on their employees, but when TPTB want to have a look, its conveniently already in place for them.

Same goes for home security systems.

They no doubt have the entire registry of these cameras for almost every building in the country, private or public. If a website link is provided with it, for you to watch, then its all public.

I didn't write this effectively but you know what I mean.

We are all buying the products that enable them to spy. Not protesting about workplace cameras.

Not really protesting anything.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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So the big gaming companies are teaming up with the government to create a device that can double as a secret video camera that uploads videos of you to the government....that's what you're saying, right?

1. Why the hell would they want to see people sitting on their couches?
Just because it's in 1984, doesn't mean it's some great way to implement an authoritarian government.
They don't need to see what you're doing to control you. you mention a brave new world, but you obviously don't get it. The fact that the people are playing games is enough control as it is. They don't need to watch you.

2. Video sensors and stuff seems like the obvious progression of video game technology, now that graphics and processing speed are nearing their point of limiting returns. Really, video sensors are about the only viable progression point on the way to virtual reality. That is what games are progressing towards, virtual reality.
So why does it have to be some conspiracy that the market is moving in this direction?



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by Ghost375
 


You seem to miss the point. The idea of literally watching everyone in the modern world, constantly and arbitrarily is unsound and logistically impossible.

Also, as to whether the Government and Microsoft colluded here is something that one could only speculate upon.

What is clear is that Intelligence agencies do have the technology to filter and analyze streaming content over networks - all open networks. Additionally laws are now in place and there is precedence for that content to be used against a person in a court of law.

So, no. Uncle Sam ( or whatever the analog is for any given nationality ) is not going to sit and watch you playing Angry Birds - as you sit on your couch, clad in BVD's, with a tragic case of "bed head". But what he will do is allow the already extant filtering and analysis software do so.

Now, imagine that you are talking to someone, in the privacy of your own home - and you say something troubling. In our modern world, death threats, talk of illegal activity, etc. The device could literally capture that, channel it out - where it is recorded by the Feds and used to question/profile/prosecute/punish you. I add "punish" because... Well five years ago how many of us ever thought that our past FB posts might end up being brought up at civilian job interviews? That idea, back then, would have been scoffed at. Now? It's real and we all know it.

To go one step further. Imagine another event, like 9/11 - or even a natural or man made disaster that causes an upswing in support for stronger government. Even martial law - in some form. Now imagine that innocent Xbox sitting there, streaming out, as you whisper to your wife that you think the government is out of control. The next thing you know, a day or two later? You're in a detention cell.

Sound absurd? The Russians did it. The Germans did it. And many nations, including China, still do it. Reeducation camps.

Will even of this come to pass in America? I cannot say. Neither can I exclude the possibility. What I do know, without a doubt, and this thread shows it, many of us are buying into the pretty wrapping and ignoring just what is really hidden inside of the box.

~Heff



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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I'm quite sure they have no interest in spying on every citizen, but for people of interest, they would.
I think its more about having as many ways in place as there can be, and all of them working in tandem, cross referencing can yield better results. The same way everybody obligingly keeps clicking "share" on Apps and social media sites.

I haven't seen this 1984 movie everybody refers to.
edit on 8-12-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by violet
 


Better than the movie, try the source, George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty-Four. I think I've seen it at the local library - though if it turned out to be a book libraries conveniently don't carry, it would not surprise me.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by AGWskeptic
I put black electrical tape over the camera on my laptop before I even powered it up.

My friends think I'm paranoid, but I know that in reality if a hacker can get in my computer they can turn my cam on.

Am I alone here?


You're definitely not alone. I'm "paranoid" like that too, however, how to disable the microphone?

I'm into computers as well, and know what is possible. I haven't used a webcam and will not start, especially unknowingly. Then again, maybe that's a red flag lol!

Also, do people remember that some school administrators in the USA have been caught red handed spying on school kids through the camera on the laptop (that the school provided). No excuse in the world justifies that.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by Philippines
 


That story rings a bell now that you mention it.
They just need the web adress your transmitting from. They would see the list of which cameras are turned on. I'm sure there are ways for anyone to turn your camera on. Remote access is in everything these days.
edit on 8-12-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


That's a much better idea.
Thanks



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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The fact that every thing is connected on the internet via satilite does not surprize me that when ever you get on your phone, game console, lap top or computer that you very well could be watched at any time, WTF I cant even take a picture on my cell phone with out it going to space first before it saves on my phone, I find it annoying and suspect.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 07:54 PM
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What if the technology for such a "game" already exists (perhaps created by an advanced civilization "before" us) and we are all, willingly or not playing a very intimate part inside the game?


In a New York Press article from August of 2011, film producer and director Tommy Pallotta, said, “I am a fan of audience participation, but I also think audiences like to be told a story. There’s this thing video game designers call a ‘golden path’—there’s a definite way that the majority of people are going to experience the game, and the designers plot that. A lot of the interactivity in a video game is really just the illusion of interactivity.

My hope is that we are on the verge of discovering what I’ve suspected this world is for many, many years: an illusion meant to give us a chance to discover ourselves and grow beyond. While there’s no consensus about this or any purpose of an illusionary world, thanks to recent progress made in quantum physics and mathematical formulations done on black holes, scientists are increasingly realizing that our world does seem to be an illusion or hologram.

Discovering that nothing in this world is real may seem depressing at first, but I think its implications could be utopian in scope. After all, if we all knew this was some kind of a dream or illusion or game, we could all just have fun in it instead of continually killing ourselves taking it so seriously. I do believe that this illusion exists for a reason. But if its principles of golden paths and viruses and avatars work so similarly to those found in video games, then perhaps there are cheat codes, secret short cuts, and Easter eggs like those found in the games in our world.


Diary of A Layman #25 (Winter): The Golden Path


According to most of the theories within the realm of quantum physics, time is an illusion, or at least, does not work in the linear fashion it appears to from our perspective. The basic idea is that every possibility that could’ve ever happened, may one day happen, or is happening all exist in one moment, and that what we focus on becomes our linear experience.

It sounds kind of confusing, but really, it’s no different than a video game. You can hold a video game disc in your hand. On that disc is all the programming that the characters within it could ever experience. Its entire life and all its life possibilities exist in one moment. As you play that game, you continually have the freedom of choice to select various paths and options that will lead to a new set of circumstances. Of course, all of these choices and circumstances have already been written into the programming code. But from the character’s perspective in the game, it all seems like a series of new experiences that have formed one path through its life.

The reason the video game metaphor seems to fit so well with our reality, is because this world may work similarly. The major difference is that we may be the ones playing our own characters’ game pieces without realizing it. How ironic that we may have had full control of our lives all along, but that since most of us tend to focus on worrying and negative outcomes that’s where we go.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 


Ok, I see what you're saying now. I must've misread it, and took what others were saying to be coming from you. Sorry about that.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 





Now, imagine that you are talking to someone, in the privacy of your own home - and you say something troubling. In our modern world, death threats, talk of illegal activity, etc. The device could literally capture that, channel it out - where it is recorded by the Feds and used to question/profile/prosecute/punish you. I add "punish" because... Well five years ago how many of us ever thought that our past FB posts might end up being brought up at civilian job interviews? That idea, back then, would have been scoffed at. Now? It's real and we all know it.


They had the potential to listen in on us through our electronical devices for decades now, it's nothing new at all.

What's the difference with our webcams and built in microphones?



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by Hefficide
reply to post by Ghost375
 


What is clear is that Intelligence agencies do have the technology to filter and analyze streaming content over networks - all open networks. Additionally laws are now in place and there is precedence for that content to be used against a person in a court of law.


They have made huge advances in facial recognition, voice identification etc, combined with good algorithms and the computer processing capacity, enough cameras and surveillance on demand, with proper preset parameters, THEY can find and identify anyone, almost anywhere.

No they aren't watching everyone, but having the ability to do it makes their jobs a lot easier.




posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:23 PM
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Google recently released a game for android phones aimed towards kids where the goal in the game is to just go to various places in their real-life city/environment. The game tracks you wherever you go and you get points, prizes and accomplishments for letting it track all your locations. Now when the kids grow up conditioned thusly and find the government tracking their every move it will simply be normal for them since they already grew up allowing it through "entertainment". People are too weak-willed to say no to these technologies.



posted on Dec, 8 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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In another thread someone mentioned cell phones to monitor your power usage in your home and it got me thinking about all these smartphone apps that give you 'control' over...everything. I can monitor all my bank accounts in one app and monitor my spending, saving and investing over the past year. There's technology being developed to monitor all the power you use and which appliances in your home are using the most energy. There's televisions that can communicate with your smartphone and refridgerators. Even thermostats that let you turn the AC on before you get home through your phone. Every little update you add to any of these...you can even share with your friends and family on Twitter and Facebook.

Given that millions of people are willfully allowing their lives to be directly and publicly available I think it's important to have discussions on the greater need to expand individual rights when it comes to what a 'reasonable expectation of privacy' means. Much like people being arrested for filming police under wiretap laws from 50 years ago our laws need to change to react to society's rapidly growing interconnectivity and availability to share every facet of their lives.






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