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Why is it impossible to get recent pictures from voyager 1 or 2 ?

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posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by zedVSzardoz
reply to post by sonicology
 


ok, I want to see the sun as a dot.

I want pictures of this historical event. It is natural to have curiosity. It is why we sent the thing up there to begin with. I want to see.

Just take 1 picture. in any direction. I would prefer ahead, just because it is the farthest we have taken a picture. But hell, take one of us, the perspective of how we look coming in from interstellar space would be priceless....


If you took a picture with Voyager "ahead" it would have less resolution and see less further ahead than Hubble. Let's put it this way. Let's say we are both in the desert and the Rocky Mountains are in the distance. You have this deep desire to see the Rocky Mountains up closer, so you hoof it across the desert for several days to get closer to the Rockies so you can see them "better." I stay where I am.

A few days later you transmit back to me a picture of the Rockies. They look pretty much like they look from where I'm standing. Maybe a tiny bit closer, but not enough to impress me. So now I take my 1000mm lens, attach it to my DSLR on a tripod, and take a picture of the Rockies from where I am at.

And my picture is a whole lot better than yours. It has a higher resolution. It shows more details. It's more dramatic. If you were to compare our two pictures, yours is crap and mine is awesome.

Well, it's the same with the Voyager and Hubble. We can get a far better picture "ahead" from here than from Voyager is. So to me to waste precious power for a crappy picture is simply not worth it, and if you did it, NASA wouldn't get $1.00 more funding.




posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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what if there was an unexpected optical effects associated with this boundary?
and the camera could "see it" by being so close to it, while we "see through it" from our distance,

interesting?

xploder



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by Philosophile
If Voyager I is at the edge of our solar system, and our solar system is roughly 100 light years across, then shouldn't it take around 100 years for us to receive any signal from Voyager 1 to pick up any picture transmission? I'm JUST asking because I don't know either that's just my idea.


100 Light years??? Me thinks Not!!!!

Try two light years and you might be more like it.

Korg.



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by samkent
This thread is a prime example of why conspiracies crop up.

1. The solar system is about 20 light HOURS in diameter not 100 light years.


Also Incorrect....

The solar system is exactly that a system that is centered on the star and ends at the point where the gravitational effects of the star no longer apply to space-time.

And you got so many stars for a wrong answer lol


Korg.



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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It found a sign saying "This is the boundary" they can't release that!



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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Originally posted by pacifier2012
It found a sign saying "This is the boundary" they can't release that!


I thought it was supposed to say "This way to alpha centauri"


Korg.



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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as far as i,ve read our galaxy is 100,000 light years across,drop in the ocean



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 02:17 AM
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reply to post by zedVSzardoz
 


We have PLENTY of images of the universe ahead of voyager with more detail than the voyager camera could show you



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 02:20 AM
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Originally posted by The0nlytruth
reply to post by zedVSzardoz
 


I completely agree with you, We should be screaming for these pictures, they do this all the time, In the words of Katt Williams "They used to let us watch the shuttles go up, now they be setting off at 3AM just so we dont know #".

They will never tell us the truth. Its time for change me thinks.


Must be a really good silencer on that or have the population around the launch sites gone deaf and blind



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by wmd_2008

Originally posted by The0nlytruth
reply to post by zedVSzardoz
 


I completely agree with you, We should be screaming for these pictures, they do this all the time, In the words of Katt Williams "They used to let us watch the shuttles go up, now they be setting off at 3AM just so we dont know #".

They will never tell us the truth. Its time for change me thinks.


Must be a really good silencer on that or have the population around the launch sites gone deaf and blind

Last time I checked I could still see and hear. In fact, as far as the shuttles went, the entire last portion of their lifespan was spent launching to ISS where the launch window was entirely dictated by the essentially immutable orbit of the space station. We who lived in the area loved night launches best, I especially loved those early morning launches since I could wait by the river and get some shut-eye while waiting rather than having to stand around in the sun all day.



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by lke123
I think that they say only 30% of what they know..


As opposed to posters like you, who say about 2000% of what they 'know'?



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by zedVSzardoz
reply to post by sonicology
 


ok, I want to see the sun as a dot.

I want pictures of this historical event. It is natural to have curiosity. It is why we sent the thing up there to begin with. I want to see.

Just take 1 picture. in any direction. I would prefer ahead, just because it is the farthest we have taken a picture. But hell, take one of us, the perspective of how we look coming in from interstellar space would be priceless....


Since they already have done so, and you never noticed, the takeaway lesson is that YOU need to get out more and look around and stop assuming that because you were never given the remedial one-on-one tutorial, the image doesn't exist.

The limits of YOUR personal knowledge falls far short of the true limits of human knowledge, and stop assuming it does.

Then the whole expanse will open to you. Come on out of your self-imposed intellectual ghetto.

We will help you. Now is finally the time.



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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"New Horizons", now on its way to Pluto [for fly-by in 2015] has a Kuiper Belt Object reconnaissance plan,
to fly past several of the iceteroids out beyond Pluto.

Problem is: none currently are known to be in the zone that the probe will enter once it passes Pluto.

Happy ending is: there are statistically bound to be some smaller objects in the zone, since the belt is so thickly populated. But they won't even be searched for until closer to fly-by time, because Pluto is currently seen against a particularly dense background star field.

In a few years, a quick search, with time lapse to show motion, will be made, and candidates will be located, and one or more will be selected, and the fly-by path will be modified to aim for the follow-on targets. It may take five years or more to get to any of them and they will be VERY dark, but long time exposures may help durng the approach.

THOSE photos will be super cool.



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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Voyager is a particular favorite of mine, since it is a cradlemate of my first child. They were both born the same month and have been traveling different paths through the Universe ever since.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 03:59 AM
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Originally posted by Korg Trinity

Originally posted by samkent
This thread is a prime example of why conspiracies crop up.

1. The solar system is about 20 light HOURS in diameter not 100 light years.


Also Incorrect....

The solar system is exactly that a system that is centered on the star and ends at the point where the gravitational effects of the star no longer apply to space-time.

And you got so many stars for a wrong answer lol


Korg.


I hate to wipe that smug grin off your face, but the gravitational affects of the star apply to all of space-time. If one were to define the size of a solar system by the presence of a gravitational effect of the sun, the entire universe would be the size of the solar system.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 06:14 AM
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Originally posted by cartesia

Originally posted by Korg Trinity

Originally posted by samkent
This thread is a prime example of why conspiracies crop up.

1. The solar system is about 20 light HOURS in diameter not 100 light years.


Also Incorrect....

The solar system is exactly that a system that is centered on the star and ends at the point where the gravitational effects of the star no longer apply to space-time.

And you got so many stars for a wrong answer lol


Korg.


I hate to wipe that smug grin off your face, but the gravitational affects of the star apply to all of space-time. If one were to define the size of a solar system by the presence of a gravitational effect of the sun, the entire universe would be the size of the solar system.


So you must be one of those people that believes our solar system is the center of the universe and everything rotates around us then???

My advice go and read some highschool physics books then come back and let's have a sensible conversation.

Korg.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 08:08 AM
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Originally posted by Korg Trinity

Originally posted by cartesia

Originally posted by Korg Trinity

Originally posted by samkent
This thread is a prime example of why conspiracies crop up.

1. The solar system is about 20 light HOURS in diameter not 100 light years.


Also Incorrect....

The solar system is exactly that a system that is centered on the star and ends at the point where the gravitational effects of the star no longer apply to space-time.

And you got so many stars for a wrong answer lol


Korg.


I hate to wipe that smug grin off your face, but the gravitational affects of the star apply to all of space-time. If one were to define the size of a solar system by the presence of a gravitational effect of the sun, the entire universe would be the size of the solar system.


So you must be one of those people that believes our solar system is the center of the universe and everything rotates around us then???

My advice go and read some highschool physics books then come back and let's have a sensible conversation.

Korg.


You've completeley misunderstood what I was saying. I think you'll find that if you go read a high school physics book you'll find that gravity does not stop at a certain distance away from something..



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by cartesia
 


So by your definition .. the gravitational pull of a mustard seed could affect another mustard seed on the other side of the universe ? ( assuming that there are only two mustard seeds in the known universe ).

As far as getting just one more pic .. I would like to see one too. Not that it would show anything. Just for nostalgia and sentimental reasons.

JG.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by cartesia
 


Cartesia and Korg Trinity, gravity of any body goes on forever but decreases with distance (the inverse square law). At some distance from the Sun, its gravity becomes so weak that gravity from other stars is more dominant. The sphere of gravitational influence of any body is called the Hill sphere. The Sun's Hill sphere extends to about 2 light years.

The Oort cloud is thought to extend out to about 1 light year, and I consider this to be the physical boundary of the Solar System. It will take the Voyagers thousands of years to reach it.



posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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I say pffft to the whole thing.
I was reading articles about this just the other day saying how it runs off "radioactive power" that amounts to
460watts. Heck your hair dryer requires 1500Watts.
Then it went on to say that that it broadcasts at something like 160watts.

I think most radio stations that I can't pick up after dark are broadcasting at some 1000-5000 watts!
Yet miraculously the Voyager can defeat the Exosphere radio interference and the Ionosphere which would tend to bounce the waves back out into the solar system, and be picked up across the entire distance with a mere less than 200watts??
It doesn't make sense to me.






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