Humans Are Engines of Desire

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posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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I remembered this quote from a manga I read a while ago -- Gantz to be specific. Somehow it stuck with me. Think about everything we are, everything we do, and why we do it. Almost always, it is desire that fuels us. We are biological machines -- engines --that are driven by the desire to do so many things.

The desire to procreate, to succeed, the desire to live comfortably. The desire to attain knowledge, use that knowledge for innovation, and apply it to our everyday existence. We look for a partner because we desire romance, friendship & intimacy. We reach for religion & philosophy because our sentience leaves us vulnerable, and infinitely curious at the same time. Desire is the force that keeps consciousness intact & bursting forward. It creates addicts of every kind. Tyrants. Leaders. Inventors. Technology. Lovers. It is our hope, and the abyss.

The most noble and caring of people are driven by it. The most bloodthirsty sadists & primitive minds, and everything in between. We are chemically driven, psychologically manufactured (engines of desire).




posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:09 PM
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My name, Mugen, is a character in an anime called Samurai Champloo. You heard of it? Is only 26 episodes.

Many times throughout the show it refers to 'why are we doing this?' or 'what desires you?' Which seems to be a common theme..... not only in animes, but every where, like you say.



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:12 PM
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It all stems from one basic desire too.

Do not die today.

Thousands of years later when we're not in danger of being trampled by the wooly mammoth and his friends or we're not looking over our shoulders for mr sabre tooth, we still live by that one desire.

Except the desire has no basis now... so we make ones up.

Don't look stupid in public, don't talk to that man with the gun and the ski mask, make sure I look wealthy so I fit in with my peers.

etc etc..

We constantly desire things because the normal state for us is motivation away from danger or more so now, unhappiness. Anything that isn't immediately dangerous and makes us happy is good. Even if it's actually detrimental to our long term safety..

We certainly are biological machines. Programmed over time to move away from danger or pain and into a sedentary state.

It's funny how everything else gets in the way of that one simple desire.
edit on 2-12-2012 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 


Definitely. Survival is still a primary desire, but much less so than it used to be. Instead we exchange surviving for "living". Living in pleasure & comfort. Why people are attracted to drugs, money, & so much else. There are some benefits to these desires, as well as some downfalls. It's really a battle for balance. Sometimes it tips towards the negative side(s), sometimes towards the positive. Technological innovation and artistry are two examples of the latter.



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by Raelsatu
I remembered this quote from a manga I read a while ago -- Gantz to be specific. Somehow it stuck with me. Think about everything we are, everything we do, and why we do it. Almost always, it is desire that fuels us. We are biological machines -- engines --that are driven by the desire to do so many things.

The desire to procreate, to succeed, the desire to live comfortably. The desire to attain knowledge, use that knowledge for innovation, and apply it to our everyday existence. We look for a partner because we desire romance, friendship & intimacy. We reach for religion & philosophy because our sentience leaves us vulnerable, and infinitely curious at the same time. Desire is the force that keeps consciousness intact & bursting forward. It creates addicts of every kind. Tyrants. Leaders. Inventors. Technology. Lovers. It is our hope, and the abyss.

The most noble and caring of people are driven by it. The most bloodthirsty sadists & primitive minds, and everything in between. We are chemically driven, psychologically manufactured (engines of desire).


So that's the problem, I have engine problems. I have little desire to do much other than learn now. Must be some bad lifters and a worn out cam. Could be a problem with the new GMO fuels also.



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by Raelsatu
There are some benefits to these desires, as well as some downfalls...


I'll be the judge of that!

This most basic pillar of all human motivation, desire, is nothing more that greed. Greed, greed, greed. It must be crushed by force. Period, end of story. Excuse me while I stick my fingers in my ears and childishly stick out my tongue. Na na na nana
edit on 2-12-2012 by METACOMET because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by METACOMET
 


Greed stems from desire. It's a pillar, and a large one at that, but not the only one. Barely even the main one. What is money and power if there's nothing to use it on? I believe at the base of it all is the desire for freedom. Even the most greedy need freedom. Freedom of thought & action is definitely the main pillar. I do see what you're saying about greed though; these days (and centuries ago) greed has been a relentless wind in the faces of nearly everyone that's lived.
edit on 2-12-2012 by Raelsatu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by Raelsatu
 


One must never look at this subject from a logical standpoint, such as you are doing.

You must see that all desire for success is the exploitation, cheating, and robbery of others, without exception. Desire is dangerous. Desire is greed. We cannot allow people to achieve their desires in case those who fail feel worthless. You see?

Don't you want to be a part of the 21st century vanguard proletariat, man? Don't stars and flags mean anything to you?



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by METACOMET
 


Desire for success does not exclusively entail the things you've laid out. And again, greed is only a facet of desire. A powerful one at that, but that doesn't negate the main point I'm making. The proletariat are essential cogs in our social & cultural construct. I'm not excusing the insatiable greed of a select few that creates a well of disparity. I'm simply pointing out the clear truth that desire is the core root of everything that stems forth. That includes greed, unfortunately. It also includes paths for better living, expanded knowledge, the spread of information, art & innovation. Every novel creation is a a byproduct of that inherent desire.
edit on 3-12-2012 by Raelsatu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by winofiend
 



It all stems from one basic desire too.

Do not die today.

I don't think that is necessarily correct. I desire cigarettes, but they could kill me very quickly. I desire knowledge, not only because it helps me survive, but because I like to understand how the Universe works. I have no practical way of making my life better or safer by understanding quantum mechanics, I learn it because it interests me, it pleasures me, just like the cigarette.

There are two basic things driving our desire: fear and pleasure. We desire some things because of fear (whether it's fear of death or something else), and we desire other things because of pleasure (whether it's physical pleasure or intellectual pleasure). Some people take part in extreme sports because the fear of death gives them a rush of pleasure.
edit on 3/12/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Great points made here. Fear & pleasure are intertwined more often than not. Many times the potential for death plays its part in the seeking of pleasure. Drugs for example (cigarettes in your case) induce a chemical & psychological pleasure; one that can so easily transform into death, dependence, & suffering in general. I think what he was trying to get at is that avoiding imminent death is a basic desire. Self-induced death, whether incremental or instant, is desire also. Even suicide is a desire (one in which you are unwilling to tolerate the suffering),



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by Raelsatu
Think about everything we are, everything we do, and why we do it. Almost always, it is desire that fuels us. We are biological machines -- engines --that are driven by the desire to do so many things.

Plato believed that human soul is like a chariot drawn by two horses named desire and impatience. And in the chariot, handling the ribbons is the intellect. So basically this view is not new, desire is an important thing in human life, but there are other things, too.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by Raelsatu
 



I think what he was trying to get at is that avoiding imminent death is a basic desire.

Yes, it's certainly a very basic desire, but not the only driving desire.


Even suicide is a desire (one in which you are unwilling to tolerate the suffering)

That's a very good point too. In that case the desire would be driven by a lack of pleasure and/or a fear of too much pain.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by mrkeen
 



desire is an important thing in human life, but there are other things, too.

I don't agree. Desire is the fundamental driving force of everything we do. Everything we do, we do because we desire some sort of specific outcome. Of course... we may do something completely random for no specific reason, so perhaps that is some "other thing" to human life.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by mrkeen
 


Thank you for the post... Plato put it well. Also, I didn't say this is a new idea; it's just that particular quote that came to mind that prompted me to share my thoughts on it.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 01:42 AM
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reply to post by Raelsatu
 


Your view of desire is, understandably, very critical. But what of someone who desires the "right" thing, such as spiritual fulfillment or some form of transcendence? Is desire still a binding force for someone who desires something beyond themselves?



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by Captain Reynolds
reply to post by Raelsatu
 


Your view of desire is, understandably, very critical. But what of someone who desires the "right" thing, such as spiritual fulfillment or some form of transcendence? Is desire still a binding force for someone who desires something beyond themselves?

You clearly haven't understood what the OP was saying if you think he/she was being overly critical of desire and the bad things it leads to. And as for your question, the desire to "transcend" is just another way of saying you want to become immortal, which is to say you desire to overcome death because you fear death.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 02:29 AM
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Originally posted by Captain Reynolds
reply to post by Raelsatu
 


Your view of desire is, understandably, very critical. But what of someone who desires the "right" thing, such as spiritual fulfillment or some form of transcendence? Is desire still a binding force for someone who desires something beyond themselves?


I wasn't learning towards criticizing it. Desire has the potential for either side of the coin; balance lies in between, but there will always be a pull towards opposing ends of the spectrum. Some will let their desire be used in ways that we'd consider evil; others will follow their desire to help other humans.

Spiritual fulfillment is just as much a desire as anything else.. whether or not the spiritual aspect is "beyond" us I can't say for sure.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 05:33 AM
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Who's desire?



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 




do something completely random for no specific reason


Agree with your post (star for you) but everything you do has a reason even if you are not conscious of it. In fact many things you do are directed and processed at a subconscious level.

For instance the way vision works is extremely automated, you are only aware of a very small part of the process, and a large part of it is simply inference and assumption that is processed as a full scene. More complex action (or decision processes) have the same issue, at times you become aware of the lack of the rational for doing something or even forget of having done something (for example locking a door, turning the lights off etc).





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