Private Prison Company Used in Drug Raids in Private High School

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posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by Brandyjack
What is so hard to believe? Baby Bush and Rumsfeld tried to take the National Defense and U.S. military private for eight years. After all, private soldiers fight for who pays them, not the country or the average citizens. So, the "anti-crime" people will do it with the police. After all, private "security police" protect who pays them, not the citizens.


Internationally that's always been the case.

My great great great great great great etc... uncle was a commander of a German conscript group that fought at the seige of Yorktown, 30,000 Germans soldiers were "rented" by their cash strapped princes to king George. Most of them sympathized with the colonials and many ran off and stayed here. But the ones who couldn't get away were forced to fight the Americans.

We're still in Afghanistan because they have some of the richest lithium deposits on the planet, and we're going to war with Iran to get control of the oil, it's an old story unfortunately.

Anyone who doesn't believe it just look at Rwanda and the like, they have nothing American corporate interests want, so they're not worth the effort.

We shot into Libya after only a few weeks and a few hundred killed, 800,000 thousand died in Rwanda over the course of years, and we did nothing.


Allowing corporations to run our penal system is a huge mistake and goes against everything this country was founded on. Debtors prisons were abolished and prosecution and punishment was done by the law.

As if this wasn't bad enough, now we're treating them as LEO's?.

There is a reason law enforcement officers are required to take an oath, to prove that their loyalty is to the laws of the United States.

The only person a private contractor is loyal to is the one who sends his paychecks, company policy trumps the law.

edit on 2-12-2012 by AGWskeptic because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 

Dear ANOK,

Thanks for asking the questions. I found some data for the end of 2010, but at two years old you may not be interested. I'm not trying to prove anything by it, just adding info.

At the end of 2010, there were 7,076,200 in the system.
4,887,900 were on probation or parole.
Of those who were actually incarcerated, 748,728 were in jail and 1,518,104 were in state or federal prison.
The vast majority of those in government run prisons were in state facilities 1,216,771 to the feds' 181,767.
There were 94,365 in privately run state prisons and 25,318 in private federal prisons.

So a little over 5% of the people behind bars are in private facilities.
bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov...

Sure, there are a lot of "What if's," and "slippery slopes" possible, one might even happen, who knows? But there are state and federal correctional employee unions, and I don't think they're going to let themselves get run out of business.

As far as prison industries go, my opinion is fairly simple and subject to change. Don't hurt, or demean the prisoners. Make sure they have the necessities of life. After that, it's pretty much open to negotiation.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by magma
 


Yeah, that would really suck.

www.aclu.org...


Zero-tolerance disciplinary policies are often the first step in a child’s journey through the pipeline.
edit on 2-12-2012 by AGWskeptic because: (no reason given)





• Zero-tolerance policies impose severe discipline on students without regard to individual circumstances. Under these policies, children have been expelled for giving Midol to a classmate, bringing household goods (including a kitchen knife) to school to donate to Goodwill, and bring¬ing scissors to class for an art project.
edit on 2-12-2012 by AGWskeptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by charles1952
 


I lived through the privatisation of a lot of nationalised industry in the UK in the 80's.

Don't think that state services cannot be privatised, unionised or not. The workers simply become employees of the new owner/s with probably better pay.

Once the ball starts rolling...Sry for the cliches but...



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 

Dear ANOK,

Sorry for the minimal post, but I agree with you pretty much completely. I suppose all we can do is add this to our "Troubling Possibilities That Need to Be Watched" file.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by ANOK
reply to post by charles1952
 


I lived through the privatisation of a lot of nationalised industry in the UK in the 80's.

Don't think that state services cannot be privatised, unionised or not. The workers simply become employees of the new owner/s with probably better pay.

Once the ball starts rolling...Sry for the cliches but...


Look at the mess they made of privatization in Russia.

I don't think it should never happen, in fact I support it for things like NASA, just not in the penal system.



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by magma
 

www.nytimes.com...

You were saying?



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by Jerk_Idiot
reply to post by magma
 

www.nytimes.com...

You were saying?


Not good is it.....



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by magma
 

Nope. Not good at all.



posted on Dec, 2 2012 @ 11:34 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 


It's been the norm for Kentucky since 1986. I worked at one of these facilities for four years. When I was there it was illegal for an inmate to work for company profit. All he could do is maintain the prison such as janitorial work, kitchen, maintenance, or community service.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 01:48 AM
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reply to post by elmrich
 


Well that's good to know. I can see them lobbying to get that law changed, because it isn't so in other states...


LOS ANGELES (FinalCall.com) - The Prison Industrial Complex is a growing industry comprised of a number of American corporations which develop household and business products, but human rights groups condemn them for netting profits which roll off the backs of prison inmates they claim are unjustly paid cents on the dollar.

At issue, they charge, is a criminal justice system which herds primarily Black youth into the hands of private prison enterprises to work illegally under a modern-day slave system called “involuntary servitude,” disguised as prison work release programs.



Private prison companies, however, essentially admit that their business model depends on locking up more and more people. For example, in a 2010 Annual Report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) stated: “The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely affected by . . . leniency in conviction or parole standards and sentencing practices . . . .” As incarceration rates skyrocket, the private prison industry expands at exponential rates, holding ever more people in its prisons and jails, and generating massive profits.


Private Prisons

The inmates still generate profit for the prisons owner/s even if they're not used for labour.




posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 05:28 AM
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Originally posted by Jerk_Idiot
reply to post by magma
 

www.nytimes.com...

You were saying?


This proves with all sense of doubt removed that society does indeed contain within it a group of people who have such a love for authority, it matters not a bit to them how that authority is managed, it can do no wrong.

Those people who are unlucky enough to get justice served by someone serving the system of the dollar and not truly serving "social" judicial recompense, and it is the "public" to whom judicial restitution is owed, are being "Used" by a corporate body, with nothing being given back to the society to whom the greatest debt is owed.

This is actually subverting the debt owed to the public at large, as a group, they owe us the benefit of them being rehabilitated, and returned to society, with their social debt expunged, returned to society a better person.
By interfering with the process of social restitution, the time that should belong to the general public's benefit is being used to create profits for a private company.

The prisoner is not benefiting from this, the public at large are not benefiting from this, the largest amount of people incarcerated anywhere in the world just so happens to be in the country where this practice is most heavily used.
The re-offending rates are massively high, after all, there is no reason to attempt to re-educate, re-skill, and make good honest citizens of those people, if they return to prison, they make profits for a corporation.

The amount of money the government pays per person per bed for doing nothing more than putting them to work for a company and not giving them the help they need to rehabilitate, would be better spent housing prisoners themselves and attempting rehabilitation and re-education of offenders.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 05:32 AM
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behind amerikan bars youre worth a lot of money

keep following the amerikan dream.....
edit on 3-12-2012 by ressiv because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by magma


Do the crime, do the time.


 


Ever had a drink? In the 20's that made u an outlaw. The problem being that not everything that is a crime should be. The original acts that constituted a crime was harming someone, or stealing from them.

If people follow unjust rules and law without objection it can have some very serious consequences.

In some parts of the world they punish woman for things they do in other countries freely. Do you want a nation of mindless zombies, or one's that stand for their rights.

Law was invented to give people rights by the way. Not to put people in prison.


The Code of Hammurabi is the longest surviving text from the Old Babylonian period.[11] The code has been seen as an early example of a fundamental law regulating a government — i.e., a primitive form of what is now known as a constitution.[12]


en.wikipedia.org...


Lord Denning described it as "the greatest constitutional document of all times – the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot".[3] In a 2005 speech, Lord Woolf described it as "first of a series of instruments that now are recognised as having a special constitutional status",


en.wikipedia.org...

Sadly, people don't even know why there are laws.
edit on 3-12-2012 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by Aloysius the Gaul

Originally posted by AGWskeptic


When did profiting from cheap inmate labor become a function of prisons?


Pretty much ever since prisons were invented, or even earlier if yuo include debtor servitude - which in ancient times WAS slavery.



The thing is, back then there weren't that many laws. Hell, the couldn't even keep a would be assassin in jail:


The Criminal Lunatics Act 1800 (39 & 40 Geo 3 c 94) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain that required and established a set procedure for the indefinite detention of mentally ill offenders. It was passed through the House of Commons in direct reaction to the trial of James Hadfield, who attempted to assassinate King George III.[2]


en.wikipedia.org...

Prosecution was also dealt with on a personal level:


Under English law, any Englishman could prosecute any crime. In practice, the prosecutor was usually the victim. It was up to him to file charges with the local magistrate, present evidence to the grand jury, and, if the grand jury found a true bill, provide evidence for the trial.[2]



www.daviddfriedman.com...



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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I think the solution is pretty clear. Prisoners should refuse to work. Someone in prison is there to do their time, not to work for a nickel an hour. You don't swing a hammer, you don't push a broom, you don't fold laundry, you don't wash dishes, you don't cook, nothing.

When organizations like CCA start to lose money by keeping people in jail, they will move on and start looking overseas to exploit people.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by VictorVonDoom
 




I think the solution is pretty clear. Prisoners should refuse to work. Someone in prison is there to do their time, not to work for a nickel an hour. You don't swing a hammer, you don't push a broom, you don't fold laundry, you don't wash dishes, you don't cook, nothing.


Then you get put in solitary confinement, (which is torture) and go crazy over time.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Brainwashed capitalists are actually praising this? Sickening! The TPTB has you under mind control quite well.

Profits and police is an awful combination.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Trustfund
 


Still works. It would be cost prohibitive to put an entire prison population in solitary. CCA would have to hire extra staff to do all the cooking and cleaning. They wouldn't make a profit from prison labor, they would look for greener pastures and people wouldn't wind up in jail over stupid stuff.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by VictorVonDoom
reply to post by Trustfund
 


Still works. It would be cost prohibitive to put an entire prison population in solitary. CCA would have to hire extra staff to do all the cooking and cleaning. They wouldn't make a profit from prison labor, they would look for greener pastures and people wouldn't wind up in jail over stupid stuff.


You are really clueless as to how the prison system works.

The prison controls every aspect of an inmates life, and if they'll do shady stuff to get people into prison, why wouldn't they do shady stuff to keep them there?

Go back to your TMZ and Doritos, this is a topic you know nothing about,





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