"Insha'Allah" in the bible.

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posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 05:37 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 



. Now we are entering politics, which is not just nor good nor anything else. It is simply politics.

No politics here.
I'm just drawing parallels between the secular worlds prison system that punishes criminals misusing their free will and causing others harm, ..... to Gods system of punishing people for misusing their free will causing others harm.


There are plenty of people there that did no harm to someone else,

Well, true... but lets save that discussion for a different thread, shall we? The prison system exists (ideally) to punish criminals who do bad things... not people who do good.

Prisoners are where they are because they live in a system that punishes crime, as defined by the law. All of us exist in a universe that punishes "sin" as defined by the One who runs the universe.

edit on 1-12-2012 by sk0rpi0n because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 05:38 AM
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God 'thinks' himself human for a while.
God gets lost in the form and thinks/believes he is the form until he realizes himself as the formlessness behind the form.
God plays hide and seek.
edit on 1-12-2012 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by sk0rpi0n


Well, true... but lets save that discussion for a different thread, shall we? The prison system exists (ideally) to punish criminals... not people who do good.

Prisoners are where they are because they live in a system that punishes crime, as defined by the law. All of us exist in a system that punishes "sin" as defined by the One who runs the universe.


 


The history of law really begins with the Babylonian ruler Hammurabi. Hammurabi's Code (The Code of Hammurabi) is for all intents and purposes, the first written laws of man. Had there been some earlier, it's possible, but history gets faded the further you go back.

However, the whole morality laws, are a recent development. Many argue that morality and law should no even co-mingle. You see law, is designed to protect inherent rights of men. It really should have nothing to do with morality, and the current system I do not see as moral, nor instilling morality. Moral issues are ones that are dealt with on a personal level, or at least should be.

Hammurabi's Code though, was not very forgiving.


The structure of the code is very specific, with each offense receiving a specified punishment. The punishments tended to be very harsh by modern standards, with many offenses resulting in death, disfigurement, or the use of the "Eye for eye, tooth for tooth" (Lex Talionis "Law of Retaliation") philosophy.[25] The code is also one of the earliest examples of the idea of presumption of innocence, and it also suggests that the accused and accuser have the opportunity to provide evidence.[26] However, there is no provision for extenuating circumstances to alter the prescribed punishment.


One could also argue that Hammurabi's Code was quite just, as everyone was expected to know it, and it was not so long and convoluted that people would have trouble understanding it. Unlike the thousands upon thousands of statues we have today. Ignorance is no excuse to the law is BS in my opinion.


The code of laws was arranged in orderly groups, so that everyone who read the laws would know what was required of them.[8]


en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...

In any regard, I see the Code to be something that would have been used for control of the populace, and to promote (relative) peace among the people in the kingdom.

Funny, I also see religion as a means of control as well....

But as I stated earlier the most important, and fundamental aspect of law, is to instil rights in the people. Nothing more and nothing less. And this is something that modern day people have completely forgotten, or have never understood, (for the most part).


The Code of Hammurabi is the longest surviving text from the Old Babylonian period.[11] The code has been seen as an early example of a fundamental law regulating a government — i.e., a primitive form of what is now known as a constitution.[12][13] The code is also one of the earliest examples of the idea of presumption of innocence, and it also suggests that both the accused and accuser have the opportunity to provide evidence.[14] The occasional nature of many provisions suggests that the Code may be better read as a codification of supplementary judicial decisions of the king.





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