Police Can Access Your Email Without A Warrant If It's 180 Days Old

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posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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Police Can Access Your Email Without A Warrant If It's 180 Days Old


www.businessinsider.com

Police Can Access Your Email Without A Warrant If It's 180 Days Old





When retired four-star general and former CIA Director David Petraeus resigned from his post this month after admitting to an extramarital affair, one of the more startling revelations was that the dalliance was discovered when the FBI sifted through his private Gmail account.
The spy chief had been out-spied.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
"OMG; They're reading my e-mai!": How the media inflames privacy panic
Yahoo, Feds Battle Over E-Mail Privacy!
Gmail and privacy




posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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We should all be thanking General Petraeus and his little affair right now given that it sends a stark reminder to most about email security and some odd loopholes that were created during the first few shortsighted years of the internet.


More alarming is that the average American could easily be subjected to the same snooping that Petraeus endured. According to current law, police can access email through a provider, like Yahoo or Gmail, without a warrant if the message is more than 180 days old.
The rule is a relic of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, written before legislators could dream of the explosion of technology and ubiquity of email, text messaging, online chatting and other communications that leave behind an electronic trail.


Read more: www.businessinsider.com...


I never had even heard of this before. It seems so odd that email could be considered abandoned. And I'm surprised the General wasn't aware of it to begin with. (Or maybe he was and just didn't care).

en.wikipedia.org...


After 180 days in the U.S., email messages lose their status as a protected communication under the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and become just another database record.[1] This means that a subpoena instead of a warrant is all that is needed for a government agency to force email providers such as Google's Gmail to produce a copy.[1] Other countries may even lack this basic protection, and Google's databases are distributed all over the world. Since the Patriot Act was passed, it's unclear whether this ECPA protection is worth much anymore in the U.S., or whether it even applies to email that originates from non-citizens in other countries.


I suppose nothing online is private. Any chance they will be subpoenaing any bankers records from 2008?



The ones that were heard in congress insofar were hysterical.

C'mon... Just do it for the laughs.



www.businessinsider.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 02:44 AM
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No they can't the Statute is unconstitutional. People need to learn their Constitution and let their ISPs know the law and their liability if they submit to LE without a proper warrant.


privateaudio.homestead.com...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by hawkiye
 


Before the ECPA email was not even considered private communications. Which means the act itself is the only thing backing email as something that is protected by the 4th amendment, however, it also states that after 180 days, it no longer holds that status.

This is currently being debated by the supreme court and the statute is considering revision at the moment:

www.saul.com...



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 


They're doing better than me. By the time 180 days roll around, I've already forgotten my password.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:10 AM
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reply to post by Bleeeeep
 




Too true..



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:11 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 

It doesn't matter its still unconstitutional your rights don't expire in 180 days you have to defend them and statutes are not law they are corporate policy. Its going to take a national movement of people defending their rights to get these bastards to respect them.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:23 AM
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reply to post by boncho
 


The law does state 180 days, but is fraught with loopholes and snares.


Emails are also governed by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and the Patriot Act. Although the ECPA originally set up protections (such as a warrant requirement) to protect email, those protections have been weakened in many instances by the Patriot Act. Even where the protections remain under the ECPA, emails lose their status as a protected communication in 180 days, which means a warrant is no longer necessary and your emails can be accessed by a simple subpoena.


That's a basic summary - but here's just one indication of the trouble:


Unlike your email at work, emailing from home is more likely to grant you a reasonable expectation of privacy, but even then, it's not very difficult for prying eyes to gain access to your emails. Because your emails are stored locally, at your ISP, and on the receiving end, there are multiple points that hackers or law enforcement can gain access to. While it may be difficult for law enforcement to legally gain access to your home computer and local copies of your emails, it is substantially less difficult for them to get your ISP to turn over your emails.

ISPs are also increasingly creating End User Service Agreements that users must agree to abide by. These agreements reduce any expectation of privacy, and often include terms that grant the ISP the right to monitor your network traffic or turn over records at the request of a government agency.

Source

This doesn't even address everything flowing through fusion centers as it all goes on its merry way through Cyberspace - and actually hits our inbox already replicated, filtered for keywords, and stored by others.

There is a reason why Government still relies heavily upon paper - and even more on human information transfer devices ( Ambassadors ). That reason is that, in the digital age, nothing is safe online.

Oh, and get used to the terms "Cyberthreat", "Cyberwar", "Cyberterrorism", and "Cybersecurity" - these are just a few of the Newspeak buzzwords for our consumption. because the new reality is that Cyberspace is considered to be real territory that is under attack. Therefore the reality is, we are speaking to one another in a recognized war zone - where military law will trump civilian law each and every time the Government needs it to.

~Heff



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:37 AM
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So what is the current countdown for the Fast and Furious Gun thingie? Sure them fools used Gmail...

My over 180day old emails are full of spam anyhow - bring it (said the nobody).

Don't use your real name or address when making those free email accounts. I know that may be a law breaker somewhere, but they'd have to catch you first. Millions of people do this so the odds of them catching you are slim - if you are up to no good, you should have common sense to use new accounts ever so often (now, maybe at the 120day mark). And the I.P. maskers that your Firefox uses is icing on the cake.

Need an online Ali@s? Try: www.fakemailgenerator.com...

Just don't violate any laws.

-CN



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:41 AM
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Originally posted by hawkiye
reply to post by boncho
 

It doesn't matter its still unconstitutional your rights don't expire in 180 days you have to defend them and statutes are not law they are corporate policy. Its going to take a national movement of people defending their rights to get these bastards to respect them.


No, because the internet was not around when the constitution was made. And in that, private communications that you are protected from by the 4th Amendment did not include emails. Hell, even telephone conversations were not included for 40 or 50 some odd years.

If the internet was declared public domain, nothing at all would be protected by the fourth amendment as soon as it went online. Fortunately, because banks operate on the internet, as well as many other privacy sensitive institutions, I don't think you will ever see that.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by Hefficide



Oh, and get used to the terms "Cyberthreat", "Cyberwar", "Cyberterrorism", and "Cybersecurity" - these are just a few of the Newspeak buzzwords for our consumption. because the new reality is that Cyberspace is considered to be real territory that is under attack. Therefore the reality is, we are speaking to one another in a recognized war zone - where military law will trump civilian law each and every time the Government needs it to.


 


No kidding. The "digital warzone".

It is hard to imagine when you are old enough to remember booting up a 386 and waiting 10 mins just so one picture on playboy.com would load, only to find out you needed a membership to see more of those god awful pixelated smudges on the VGA screen.

I knew the internet was going to be commercialized eventually, I used to say it back then, but had no idea just exactly how it was going to happen. Unfortunately...

($)



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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Yeah,,
they can also track you via your phone using the GPS/911 feature with out a warrant..
welcome to the real "Prison Planet"



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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That does not seem right...the intent of privacy laws was not time limited. It would be different if it was physical evidence in your home (even if 180+ days old).



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 08:07 AM
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And if the General is the"Reason" for this to happen now..
it sounds like another excuse to tighten the grip on public freedoms
lets crash a plane into a building so we can forever cause unneeded searched in airports
and allow the governments to remove freedoms of innocent Americans as a result
edit on 1-12-2012 by Lil Drummerboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 08:11 AM
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Well I am one of those that love to read E-mail daily and then erase what I don't want daily, only important E-mail that has to do with certain issues like financial transactions I keep in and have nothing to do with damaging information.


I can not understand why somebody will like to keep trash in their in box for months, my will fill out in one day if I don't erase it.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 08:30 AM
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Dont providers like Yahoo, Gmail and Hotmail wipe your account if not accessed after a period of time?

Last I read it was 90 days for Yahoo, 60 days for Gmail and something similar for Hotmail.

If this lets them look into messages that are 180 days in an active account that's especially disconcerting. It isnt abandoned at all if the account is still active.

If the general was communicating via draft messaged then even though the original message may be 180 days old or older are the edits to the draft more recent than that?

This reads like a very poorly written piece of pseudo legislation enacted by people who do not understand how the thing they are trying to regulate even works.

Shouldnt surprise me. Legislators write and enact laws on things they know nothing about every session. Shoulder things that go up.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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PGP has been around for twenty years now. There is no excuse except apathy for the government to have any access to your email between end points. Keep your operating system on a thumb drive or use a net book and they will never have access without you knowing.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by dainoyfb
 


I wish I could star you more for the mention of PGP (and by proxy GnuPG), the assumption in this day and age should be unless you are encrypting your emails somebody is reading them. I have crypto setups for everything of importance and USB bootable linux distros to ensure a lack of software based key-loggers and malware, its so east that honestly everybody should be similarly kitted out for their own protection.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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All they are going to find in my E-Mail is spam and Yooper Yard Sale stuff. I'd rather pick up the phone and talk to someone in person myself. I know who is getting the info that way. Have at it cops, most of the mail I don't even want to read myself......Read the Jokes that a friend sends me occasionally though, they are pretty funny.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by boncho

Police Can Access Your Email Without A Warrant If It's 180 Days Old


www.businessinsider.com

Police Can Access Your Email Without A Warrant If It's 180 Days Old





When retired four-star general and former CIA Director David Petraeus resigned from his post this month after admitting to an extramarital affair, one of the more startling revelations was that the dalliance was discovered when the FBI sifted through his private Gmail account.
The spy chief had been out-spied.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
"OMG; They're reading my e-mai!": How the media inflames privacy panic
Yahoo, Feds Battle Over E-Mail Privacy!
Gmail and privacy




I do not see the big deal. The new NSA center in Utah will intercept every single phone call, every email message,every instant message, every text, anything you do on your computer anywhere in the world on a daily basis. It has the ability to interpret gigaflops of data. They will know more about you then you know about yourself. Not to mention they will have the ability to track you at pretty much all times.

Look up Stellar Wind.

www.wired.com...

p.s. I should add.. we have allowed this to happen under the guise of 9/11 and the Patriot act we in essence have had no objection to being spied on. The Government has somehow conditioned a response of "Well if I have nothing to hide then I have nothing to worry about" and "if you protest against this you are a domestic terrorist and should feel repulsive". To me the issue is much more complex then that.. They have introduced technology and passed it off as wonderful and a great benefit to human kind but in reality are just more chains that are used to restrict and bind people to the will of the Government. You almost cannot buy a phone that does not have location tracking in it. Cell phones have been presented as a must have for anyone. You have any idea how dangerous to your health there are? They may end making cigarettes look safe by comparison. It simply cannot be good for a person to have more and more wireless signals bouncing around your brains and bodies. People who live under power lines or near stations die at much much much higher rate (life expectancy) than people who do not. Resale values of houses can be determined by proximity to power lines or stations.
edit on 1-12-2012 by GArnold because: (no reason given)
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edit on 1-12-2012 by GArnold because: (no reason given)
edit on 1-12-2012 by GArnold because: (no reason given)





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