Prepping for 12/21/12

page: 2
1
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:09 AM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


So you’ve been prepping for some time now (according to you) and you’ve stocked a month or 2 worth of frozen meats and veggies and a few drinks?


If that’s all you have then I’d suggest you quickly acquire a firearm (or 3) and several thousand rounds of ammo. How about water purification and storage? Dried foods? Cold weather gear (Zero degree sleeping bags, clothing, boots, etc). How to you plan to cook that meat when you have no power? Do you have a saw and axe to get firewood? Any propane or charcoal? It doesn’t sound like you’re taking your preps too seriously!


I don’t necessarily believe in Mayan prophecy or the whole 12/21/12 thing but I do think prepping is a serious function. Maybe that’s because I’m a father. I feel better when I know that I’m ready to take care of my family even if the lights go out! If this whole thing is a steaming pile of paranoia...so what?? I’m still prepared for whatever, right?



edit on 29-11-2012 by seabag because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:11 AM
link   

Originally posted by elevatedone

I've scheduled a vacation day from work.



I'm on vacation from Dec 15 - 23!


This should be interesting!



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:12 AM
link   
reply to post by seabag
 


Dec 21st through Dec 26th for me



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:17 AM
link   
Don't forget your finger foods! The natives can get restless while the turkey fries!
I have been thinking of this one my self lately! Have fun!



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 11:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by seabag
reply to post by rickymouse
 


So you’ve been prepping for some time now (according to you) and you’ve stocked a month or 2 worth of frozen meats and veggies and a few drinks?


If that’s all you have then I’d suggest you quickly acquire a firearm (or 3) and several thousand rounds of ammo. How about water purification and storage? Dried foods? Cold weather gear (Zero degree sleeping bags, clothing, boots, etc). How to you plan to cook that meat when you have no power? Do you have a saw and axe to get firewood? Any propane or charcoal? It doesn’t sound like you’re taking your preps too seriously!


I don’t necessarily believe in Mayan prophecy or the whole 12/21/12 thing but I do think prepping is a serious function. Maybe that’s because I’m a father. I feel better when I know that I’m ready to take care of my family even if the lights go out! If this whole thing is a steaming pile of paranoia...so what?? I’m still prepared for whatever, right?



edit on 29-11-2012 by seabag because: (no reason given)


I have a quarter of beef, six chickens, a turkey, four whitefish, some pork and bacon along with veggies and pizzas in my two big freezers. That is not prepping, that is the way we have always done things. Prepping is buying the old wood cookstove that I built my house in anticipation of getting twenty years ago. Prepping is boosting my firewood to include enough firewood to completely heat the house if needed, basically getting a year in advance wood, something that people always did around here a while back. I was lazy, not looking out for the future, I am not lazy anymore. I have food for my daughters and their families stored, not just for us. I have food for two months eating normally for ten. I cannot go any bigger without wasting because we can not rotate it being just me and my wife doing the rotating.

I also have a gas grill, campstove with fuel, wood smoker, generators, lamps, on and on. No bug out bag though, that is not something I think is important. See, I have always been instinctively mostly prepped, it is something I was conditioned to be when I was young. Learned behavior that I didn't know I was taught. With the way things were going I felt it was unwise to try to tell my kids to be prepared, something driven into me as a kid. It wasn't socially acceptable anymore, they would call you a hoarder for many years there. I was a closet prepper, a social outcast hidden by my remoteness. My wife has started to see this need for a pantry through others, even she wouldn't heed my concerns, she was worried that if people saw we had food they would think we were hoarders.

As for guns.......I'm a deer hunter and like to bird hunt once in a while. I had to update my ammo last year, it was pretty old. I bought quite a few 22 shells because I like to target shoot with that once in a while.
edit on 29-11-2012 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 12:44 PM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


I too was taught to save, save and save some more.. My grandparents were "savers" my parents are "savers" and yes we were in the closet for many many years. i dare not tell anyone when I was young that we had a basement full of food supplies for a year, etc... nor did I ever tell anyone of my own stash for many many years. Now it's almost considered normal or smart again. My grandparents grew up during the depression and victory garden days.. it was a top priority that I learn to garden, save seed, can and learn how to hunt and fish even though I was a girl. I can kill anything with an arrow too and set traps. I know how to kill, clean and cull everything from a deer to a chicken and i can sew, knit, and figure out how to repair almost anything electronic. These are basic survival skills that my parents made sure I knew, and now I teach my own the same. It may not be my generation that needs to remember these things but I will make sure mine know how to survive too.



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 12:44 PM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


I too was taught to save, save and save some more.. My grandparents were "savers" my parents are "savers" and yes we were in the closet for many many years. i dare not tell anyone when I was young that we had a basement full of food supplies for a year, etc... nor did I ever tell anyone of my own stash for many many years. Now it's almost considered normal or smart again. My grandparents grew up during the depression and victory garden days.. it was a top priority that I learn to garden, save seed, can and learn how to hunt and fish even though I was a girl. I can kill anything with an arrow too and set traps. I know how to kill, clean and cull everything from a deer to a chicken and i can sew, knit, and figure out how to repair almost anything electronic. These are basic survival skills that my parents made sure I knew, and now I teach my own the same. It may not be my generation that needs to remember these things but I will make sure mine know how to survive too.



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 01:30 PM
link   
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 


It wasn't so much the depression that caused people to store foods, it was more the threat of nuclear war. Our government used to have emergency ration stores for big disasters all over the country. They quit this many years back counting on the businesses to have stocks of food in reserve. Problem is that these stocks are not nearly enough for even a disaster that would disable California and some other coastal states. It is our own responsibility to provide for our survival at least till the nation can pull together to help. I see a months supply as adequate food myself, others think that more is needed. This drought sure doesn't help, this will lower the reserves we have. We can count on some help from other countries, they have a lot of good people in them that will try to help. Even though they disagree with our government policies, they do not hate all of the people. During the 911 attacks they targeted our military and our financial sector, not the regular people. This does not mean that they won't indiscriminately cause massive kaos in the future though. I expect that the world could pull together if a big disaster occurs if greed and pride of the leaders does not occur.

Cripes, the stores can't even sell anything if the power goes out for a day.



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 11:23 PM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


well thats interesting but if you had asked my grandma when she was alive why she "hoarded" food and money..; ( she hid money everywhere too.. she would tell you.. don't trust the government with your money and she wasn't ever going to be hungry ever again aka the depression and bank collapse never mind the dust bowl and WW2. The grapes of wrath were my grandparents. lol no joke,



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 11:30 PM
link   
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 


My grandparents were farmers and miners. They didn't have a shortage of food and also bartered with others or provided them with something to eat. Sharing food with your family was always done. People would help out to get some food to eat back those days. Even though these small communities didn't get as effected as other parts of the country, they did get effected and had to work harder. It was a different world back then, the present society here would have more problems because we have put our faith in deceit.



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 11:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 


My grandparents were farmers and miners. They didn't have a shortage of food and also bartered with others or provided them with something to eat. Sharing food with your family was always done. People would help out to get some food to eat back those days. Even though these small communities didn't get as effected as other parts of the country, they did get effected and had to work harder. It was a different world back then, the present society here would have more problems because we have put our faith in deceit.


uh huh.... My grandparents ( all 4) grew up on farms in oklahoma. I think you have a weird view of what the depression was like.. there were no crops, yes the communities helped in the beginning when they could however the small communities were hit just as hard as the larger ones if not more so because once you couldn't feed your livestock or grow your veggies.. you were pretty screwed. My granddad hopped freight trains back in the day to go look for work because there wasn't any to be had.. he once told me a story of riding the train and a stranger gave him a biscuit.. it was hard and stale and he said nothing had ever tasted better because he hadn't eaten anything in over a week at that time... they lived through desperate times... not something I'd ever want to experience thats for sure.



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 11:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 


My grandparents were farmers and miners. They didn't have a shortage of food and also bartered with others or provided them with something to eat. Sharing food with your family was always done. People would help out to get some food to eat back those days. Even though these small communities didn't get as effected as other parts of the country, they did get effected and had to work harder. It was a different world back then, the present society here would have more problems because we have put our faith in deceit.


uh huh.... My grandparents ( all 4) grew up on farms in oklahoma. I think you have a weird view of what the depression was like.. there were no crops, yes the communities helped in the beginning when they could however the small communities were hit just as hard as the larger ones if not more so because once you couldn't feed your livestock or grow your veggies.. you were pretty screwed. My granddad hopped freight trains back in the day to go look for work because there wasn't any to be had.. he once told me a story of riding the train and a stranger gave him a biscuit.. it was hard and stale and he said nothing had ever tasted better because he hadn't eaten anything in over a week at that time... they lived through desperate times... not something I'd ever want to experience thats for sure.



posted on Nov, 30 2012 @ 07:09 AM
link   
reply to post by gnosticagnostic
 


Some local people had a worse time in the depression years than others. I live right next to the great lakes. We did not experience a lot of drought. There was a lot of fish to eat around here and wild game was abundant till it got overhunted because people needed food. There were a lot of people unemployed here at the time but there were also a lot of little farms. The great depression didn't effect every family the same. My family was always conservative when it came to money. Stretching a penny into a dime is natural for us. We are in a lot worse situation now, the fish in the great lakes are worse than in the depression. Lake levels on the great lakes, especially Lake Michigan especially have dropped. The Great lakes are also warming which is a problem for the fish. We won't do so well in a Depression now, the conditions are worse. I have noticed a big uptick in the number of tiny farms recently and people getting chickens. This is good for longterm stability of the area. If we could just drive out the people that don't want these hobbyfarms in the area than we would have local security. It seems that the people who don't want these things work in industries where they profit from our dependance on the economy.



posted on Nov, 30 2012 @ 07:22 AM
link   
Looks like the party is meat and potatoes for 75 guests and booze (eeer "medicine"
) for a dozen adults, which means there are about 65 children and tee-totalers.

No cheese or sausage or fruit trays? No chips or dips! This is no party! This is a High Cholesterol WAKE you are planning.



posted on Dec, 1 2012 @ 01:13 PM
link   
reply to post by Trexter Ziam
 


If Everyone in the world eats pork and beans that day, The gas cloud could blow up the world.



posted on Dec, 15 2012 @ 04:16 PM
link   
So what is a good name for a party on the 21st. Or actually it should be on the twentieth I think.

New worlds eve party?

Enter the rift celebration?

Any other ideas anyone?





top topics
 
1
<< 1   >>

log in

join