If the MOON reflects sunlight, why are the moon landing photos so DARK?

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posted on Dec, 9 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 




The extremely bright sunlight.


OK, here's a little calculation for those with some math skills.

Mercury
Average diameter: 4879.4 km
(Minimum) distance from Earth: 77,300,000 km
Angular diameter-(maximum) 13"
Albedo (maximum) .142

So if we make Venus into a regulation basketball at 75cm diameter, what would be the equivalent distance away it would be on Earth to match the Earth-Venus relationship? If it had the same albedo as Mercury, how bright would a light need to be to make the basketball visible by eye?




posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by GaryN
 


Quite ironic you asking others to answer questions when you seem to avoid this one!



Please explain this picture above using your theory of light!

You keep avoiding it I wonder WHY!!!



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 




Please explain this picture above using your theory of light!


Easy. The light is created in the Moons mesosphere, it is a known process of the interaction of X-ray planewaves with electrons. The Sun has not been shown to emit any transverse E/M radiation, which means light and heat, and on Earth, both are produced in our dense atmosphere/ionosphere by interaction with the Suns planewave emissions.
The electron density of the Moons mesosphere is much higher than was previously thought, and they believe it is from the ionisation of dust which has been lofted by electrostatic discharge.
So the light on the Moon, once created, (think of a fluorescent lamp analogy) will reflect like from any other source, which means you can see the surface and the spacecraft, and also the Earth, as there is much more and stronger light created in Earths atmosphere, but there is a limit to how far the Earth can be seen at visible wavelengths by the unaided eye. Yes, the very sensitive instruments can see Earth from much farther away, your eyes could not, the transverse waves will be very weak by the time they reach Mars even. It is only the X-ray and E/UV planewaves from the Mars ionosphere, being converted in our ionosphere, that makes Mars look like a bright point of light.
Mystery of the Lunar Ionosphere
science.nasa.gov...
And once you have calculated the answer to my little math question, if you can, we'll discus the
results.



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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But they took receding photos of the earth all the way to the moon,
from this -

to this -

and every step in between.
Are you saying there was an atmosphere of some sort extending all the way to the moon from earth?

I don't know if this theory is falsifiable if you're going to keep finding a medium for the light to 'react' in to explain away pictures from space - doesn't mean it's absolutely impossible, just but not useful or provable.

It reminds me of the idea that what we see gets inverted to appear rightside up by our brain.
Have they actually proven this yet and found the 'switching box' in the brain that does this, does anyone with specific brain-damage see the world upside down, or is the theory just based on basic optic principles?



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by GaryN
reply to post by wmd_2008
 




Please explain this picture above using your theory of light!


Easy. The light is created in the Moons mesosphere, it is a known process of the interaction of X-ray planewaves with electrons. The Sun has not been shown to emit any transverse E/M radiation, which means light and heat, and on Earth, both are produced in our dense atmosphere/ionosphere by interaction with the Suns planewave emissions.
The electron density of the Moons mesosphere is much higher than was previously thought, and they believe it is from the ionisation of dust which has been lofted by electrostatic discharge.
So the light on the Moon, once created, (think of a fluorescent lamp analogy) will reflect like from any other source, which means you can see the surface and the spacecraft, and also the Earth, as there is much more and stronger light created in Earths atmosphere, but there is a limit to how far the Earth can be seen at visible wavelengths by the unaided eye. Yes, the very sensitive instruments can see Earth from much farther away, your eyes could not, the transverse waves will be very weak by the time they reach Mars even. It is only the X-ray and E/UV planewaves from the Mars ionosphere, being converted in our ionosphere, that makes Mars look like a bright point of light.
Mystery of the Lunar Ionosphere
science.nasa.gov...
And once you have calculated the answer to my little math question, if you can, we'll discus the
results.

If the only light was coming off the Moon and the Earth, the LM in that photo wouldn't get illuminated from above.

What is illuminating the window frame and the nozzle in this photo? www.hq.nasa.gov...

How could the astronauts see the outside of their modules during the trip?
www.hq.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 10 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by wildespace
 




What is illuminating the window frame and the nozzle in this photo? www.hq.nasa.gov...

How could the astronauts see the outside of their modules during the trip?
www.hq.nasa.gov...


Excellent photos there. The second image I think is explainable: Docking lights.




The Apollo lighting system consisted of two major categories: the internal lighting system, which included all integral displays and controls lighting and general interior floodlighting; and the external spacecraft lighting which included illumination aids for rendezvous and docking, extravehicular activity, and work stations.


www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/tnD7290Lighting.pdf

The first one, you got me. I don't know why they would have any external lighting on, and if they didn't, then the creation of light by my proposed method would seem to be occurring way further away than I'd have thought possible. Puts on thinking cap...
Oh wait, I know! The light was from the UFOs that helped them get to the Moon, I still don't think they got there all by themselves. Von Braun didn't think they could have done it with the launch rockets they used, and he was pretty smart, wasn't he?



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 04:22 AM
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reply to post by GaryN
 


Please confirm this is the basis of your theory.

That in a vacuum the human eye and a camera cannot see light.

Is that your theory?



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 10:45 AM
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Originally posted by GaryN
Oh wait, I know! The light was from the UFOs that helped them get to the Moon, I still don't think they got there all by themselves. Von Braun didn't think they could have done it with the launch rockets they used, and he was pretty smart, wasn't he?
What did von Braun say and when did he say it?

I saw a video of him saying something in 1955 about refueling in orbit to get to the moon, but obviously a lot of development took place between 1955 and 1969 so that turned out to not be necessary. He was smart but he also had smart people working with him and they thought of some things he didn't think of...no one person has a monopoly on good ideas, which is why a lot of science is done in teams and often not by just one person.



posted on Dec, 11 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I thought I remembered Von Braun saying they would need a much bigger rocket, but I just did a little searching and it seems he said that the much bigger rocket would be needed for a direct ascent trip, which of course they never used. He did seem to think that the Saturn 5 could have done a direct ascent with a 2 man crew in a Gemini capsule. My error.





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