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If the MOON reflects sunlight, why are the moon landing photos so DARK?

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posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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Just throwing this out there to all you smart ATSers. I have always had ONE question about the moon landing and the possibility of it being a hoax.....The moon is a source of pretty bright light is it not? I mean, it produces quite a bit of light WAYYYY down here on earth. However, in EVERY single photo from the landing, there sure does not seem to be very much light. You would think that the brightness of the moons reflection, that it would interfere with the photos being taken. Also, would you not see a lot of reflective light on all the objects in the photos? The light we get here on earth is said to be reflecting off the moon from the sun. However, when you look at these pictures of the landing, the atmosphere is not bright near the moons surface. Can anyone shed any "light"(pun very much intended) on this please?
edit on 28-11-2012 by thesmokingman because: SNIP FOR T&C VIOLATION....
edit on 28-11-2012 by thesmokingman because: (no reason given)


Mod Edit: ALL MEMBERS: We expect civility and decorum within all topics - Please Review This Link.
edit on 11/28/2012 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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WOW


Mod Note: Off Topic, One Liners and General Back-Scratching Posts
edit on 11/28/2012 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 

Here's the short answer before everyone else beats me to it-the moon just reflects the sun. It does not generate it's own light.

Facepalm



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 


What is weird to me is that if the Moon is reflecting sunlight how come we don't see the source of this reflection? And just what is the Moon made out of that it reflects light in the first place? Moon dust is reflective? Why is only half the moon light and the rest is always dark? How come we only see one side? When we see the sunshine from Earth we are able to see the source, as the Sun goes down the source of light diminishes, so telling us the Sun is what lights up the moon seems rather impossible.
edit on 11/28/2012 by BrokenAngelWings33 because: grammar!



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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Cameras have the ability to adjust the exposure, via the shutter speed and aperture.
This is how you can cut down on light.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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The moon reflects light due to it's light colour, but it doesn't reflect that much light at all when you consider the size. When a photo is taken on the surface, it's a much smaller piece of the reflective surface.

You can do the same thing with a white piece of paper, that's how it works.
edit on 28-11-2012 by SpearMint because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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Did you see Jupiter , Mars or Venus this year .

Weird how they were so bright .

Or maybe it was all just swamp gas that was reflecting from the light of Venus all along



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by fenceSitter
reply to post by thesmokingman
 

Here's the short answer before everyone else beats me to it-the moon just reflects the sun. It does not generate it's own light.

Facepalm

Dont act like I am an idiot. Instead, learn to comprehend what you read. I said I understand that it is theorized that the light is from the suns reflection........NOW, the question WAS.......Why is this light strong ehough to reflect all the way down here so brightly, yet pics on the moons surface seem very dark? Now do you understand?........
edit on 28-11-2012 by thesmokingman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by BrokenAngelWings33
reply to post by thesmokingman
 


What is weird to me is that if the Moon is reflecting sunlight how come we don't see the source of this reflection?


We do...the source of that reflection is the surface of the Moon.



And just what is the Moon made out of that it reflects light in the first place? Moon dust is reflective?


Moon dust is generally grey, which has a relatively high albedo. Grey surface tend to reflect a lot of light.



Why is only half the moon light and the rest is always dark? How come we only see one side?


The Moon is illuminated by the Sun, which is a single light source. How could a single light source illuminate all sides of a sphere?



When we see the sunshine from Earth we are able to see the source, as the Sun goes down the source of light diminishes, so telling us the Sun is what lights up the moon seems rather impossible.


Could you explain your reasoning here a little more?



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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As has been said, the moon doesn't produce any light at all, so either you need to re-word your OP or get on google...

Looking at the moon from a distance, we see all the reflected light in one go from what would appear to be a small object in the sky. On the surface, taking pictures there, you're only going to get reflected light locally in a confined area.

Think of the earth, from space it too is radiant with reflected light, the seas glimmer blue, the clouds shine white etc. But down here on earth we're not blinded either, are we? And the sea is certainly not blue....

Do you honestly think that if you're on the surface of the moon you'd be bathed in some sort of bright, blinding luminescence?



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by BrokenAngelWings33
reply to post by thesmokingman
 

Moon dust is reflective? Why is only half the moon light and the rest is always dark? How come we only see one side?


Everything you can see reflects light.

Because we have one sun.

Because it's in geostationary orbit. Edit: Incorrect term, ignore that. It rotates on it's axis in the same time is takes to orbit Earth so the same side is always facing us.
edit on 28-11-2012 by SpearMint because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 


Small sections of the Moon's surface don't reflect a lot of light on their own...the amount of reflected light only becomes significant once all those smaller areas are put together over the entire surface of the Moon.

It's not theorized that the Moon reflects light...it's an observation. It is what happens.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by BrokenAngelWings33
Why is only half the moon light and the rest is always dark? How come we only see one side? When we see the sunshine from Earth we are able to see the source, as the Sun goes down the source of light diminishes, so telling us the Sun is what lights up the moon seems rather impossible.


Oh...my...god....

Sometimes I wonder how some people even manage to turn on their computer to post such nonsense!

At any one time, only half the moon is illuminated by the sun. Same with the earth..You have, I assume, noticed that here on earth, at certain points in the day, the sun sets and it goes dark? Same thing.....



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by SpearMint
Because it's in geostationary orbit.


The moon is not in a geostationary orbit.

It is, however, tidally locked so only one side faces us at all times.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:32 PM
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Nevermind, I thought we were here to collectively deny ignorance, yet all these sarcastic star chasers just destroy any chance of discussion here anymore. Im over it, off to bed I guess......



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by thesmokingman
Just throwing this out there to all you smart ATSers. I have always had ONE question about the moon landing and the possibility of it being a hoax.....The moon is a source of pretty bright light is it not? I mean, it produces quite a bit of light WAYYYY down here on earth. However, in EVERY single photo from the landing, there sure does not seem to be very much light. You would think that the brightness of the moons "shine", that it would interfere with the photos being taken. Also, would you not see a lot of reflective light on all the objects in the photos? The light we get here on earth is said to be reflecting off the moon from the sun. However, when you look at these pictures of the landing, the atmosphere is not bright near the moons surface. Can anyone shed any "light"(pun very much intended) on this please?


They took pictures from a sound stage because the real pictures would not be believed. What we have been taught is a pack of lies that we have bought hook line and sinker...there is no way the Sun creates the light that causes the Moon to shine...there is way to much that can change the light output at any time, much interstellar dust and other things between here and the Sun for this to be consistently the same, if it was light from the Sun this would vary what light is reflected from day to day. Look at this picture from stellarium.org... and tell me how the Sun, on the completely opposite side of Earth could create a Full moon by its reflective light? It goes against every principle of Physics and Math that we do know.



They do not want us to know the truth about the Moon, this is why they feed us this BS.
edit on 11/28/2012 by BrokenAngelWings33 because: Edit



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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Even more sometimes I see the moon during the daytime yes the sun is that bright .

as for the pictures from the moon there are many reasons as to why the light is not drowning out the photos as stated from previous posters . I would maybe bring up maybe tinted lenses



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by stumason

Originally posted by SpearMint
Because it's in geostationary orbit.


The moon is not in a geostationary orbit.

It is, however, tidally locked so only one side faces us at all times.


Uh, I got my terms mixed up and thought that's what I was saying. I can't think of the correct word.
edit on 28-11-2012 by SpearMint because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by BrokenAngelWings33
Look at this picture from www.stellarium.org and tell me how the Sun, on the completely opposite side of Earth could create a Full moon by its reflective light? It goes against every principle of Physics and Math that we do know.


Er, no it isn't "against every principle of Physics and Math that we do know".

The Sun is huge, its radius is over 100 times that of the Earth and over 300,000 times as massive.

Imagine having a huge lamp, then put a pea in front of that lamp, then put a grain of rice on the other side of the pea. The light will illuminate both one side of the pea and one side of the rice...

If the moon is ever on the opposite side of the earth than the sun, you also get what is called a lunar eclipse.. Look it up and learn something...





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