Antarctic lake's clue to alien life

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posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 08:44 PM
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Antarctic lake's clue to alien life


www.bbc.co.uk

The discovery of microbes thriving in the salty, sub-zero conditions of an Antarctic lake could raise the prospects for life on the Solar System's icy moons.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 08:44 PM
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Researchers found a diverse community of bugs living in the lake's dark environment, at temperatures of -13C.

Lake Vida, the largest of several unique lakes found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, contains no oxygen, is acidic, mostly frozen and possesses the highest nitrous oxide levels of any natural water body on Earth.

This is pretty interesting news imo, once again we have another example of life thriving in a place where it would seem impossible.

Just to throw a thought out there, if life can thrive in a place like this, how far can the line be pushed in terms of other planets? Especially when you consider that new "earth" like planets are being discovered all the time.

www.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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I don't know if there is intelligent alien life but for there to be no life at all seems like a terrible waste of an entire universe. And intelligent or not, much of it would be eons older than life on planet earth.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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wow lots of nitrous oxide

i wanna go lol



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by happykat39
 


Good point, I would probably go as far as to say that there is intelligence out there, and as an additional point on that, "they" probably have a well mapped out idea of the universe, including where we are. Going on the assumption that "they" would be much older than us (which is quite conceivable).

Obviously I'm just guessing but I strongly believe that my instincts have value in them
edit on 27-11-2012 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 



Just to throw a thought out there, if life can thrive in a place like this, how far can the line be pushed in terms of other planets? Especially when you consider that new "earth" like planets are being discovered all the time.


I would say the line can be pushed to the limit of what the life requires to live.

Life is probably everywhere in the universe. Just not in the forms that get represented by Hollywood.

But then of course there is the THING, which ironically enough came from Antarctica I think.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 


And if you believe in God, the bible and creationism who is to say that other galaxies don't have their own local resident Gods. And that could apply to parallel universes as well if you believe that God created this one.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 09:26 PM
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Life always finds a way to exist even in the harshest climates. I'm sure there are a lot more discoveries like this to be made in places we never even think to look. We as humans tend to think of life as we have on this planet, animals we see on a daily basis, plants, trees...I watched James Cameron "Aliens of the Deep" and they discovered some fungus and other neat fish that lived in places in the ocean where scientists didn't think were possible.

Science continues to fascinate me.
edit on 27-11-2012 by Charmeine because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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Side note, if you haven't watched that documentary, Aliens of the Deep - watch it. It's really interesting. They combine NASA technology with water exploration. Takes science to a whole new level.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by magma

Life is probably everywhere in the universe. Just not in the forms that get represented by Hollywood.
But then of course there is the THING, which ironically enough came from Antarctica I think.


Agreed.

I remember reading about how some scientist theorize that some form of gas filled floating life that could resemble a jelly fish type creature could possibly evolve in gas giants atmospheres similar to how sea life developed in the oceans here on Earth.

Also, The THING didn't come from Antarctica but rather was found there at a crash site of an alien spaceship.
edit on 27-11-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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Just to be a Devil's Advocate, all this proves is that once life is on a planet it can adapt to harsh environments. It does not mean it can be STARTED in these harsh environments. Again, just to play Devil's Advocate.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


Agreed. Earth has proven that again and again through different stages over time. i.e. after the dinosaurs, somehow life began again...after the ice age...life has found a way to survive and evolve and always will.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 12:48 AM
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I've often wondered this, scientists say for life to exist you need this that and the other..

... well, maybe for life that resides on earth, but i bet there's many forms of life we dont understand yet that can exist in environments without those 'basic building blocks'



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by goou111
wow lots of nitrous oxide

i wanna go lol
I have the spare nozzles pipes and cans and a turbo r34 skyline,we can sail there,pick up the Alien dudes and what that guys mom out of American pie? We pick her up too and hit the button all the way home.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
Just to be a Devil's Advocate, all this proves is that once life is on a planet it can adapt to harsh environments. It does not mean it can be STARTED in these harsh environments. Again, just to play Devil's Advocate.


so tell us what you know about starting life?



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 08:13 AM
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I think that we should redefine our use of the word Intelligent, because animals can be highly intelligent and in some cases are smarter than yer average human meat sack who wastes their brains !

I consider any life that can survive in conditions like those pretty smart !

The main thing to take from this is that if it can survive here it can survive on the ice moons of our solar system , so lets go find it , immediately send out a probe or 10 to the ice moons of our solar system and start the search , lets prove second genesis once and for all !



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
Just to be a Devil's Advocate, all this proves is that once life is on a planet it can adapt to harsh environments. It does not mean it can be STARTED in these harsh environments. Again, just to play Devil's Advocate.


so tell us what you know about starting life?


Yes but whose to say that it didnt start there in the first place , the chances of bacteria and microbes travelling to these regions and then adapting are quite slim !
Its more logical to suggest that they started out there and adapted with the changes as the area changed !



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by sapien82

Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
Just to be a Devil's Advocate, all this proves is that once life is on a planet it can adapt to harsh environments. It does not mean it can be STARTED in these harsh environments. Again, just to play Devil's Advocate.


so tell us what you know about starting life?


Yes but whose to say that it didnt start there in the first place , the chances of bacteria and microbes travelling to these regions and then adapting are quite slim !
Its more logical to suggest that they started out there and adapted with the changes as the area changed !


it's only been covered for the last 2,800 years. are you saying it was devoid of life previous to being covered with ice? and then the bacteria spontaneously appeared already adapted to the environment?

to be clear I am a big proponent of panspermia and alien terraforming as our origins.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:33 AM
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Earthbound scientists are either a bunch of dumbasses or are part of a disinfo campaign designed to make people think that life outside of this planet is impossible. Life doesn't work the way they're insisting. Life can exist under an extremely wide range of conditions. The idea that "if humans can't survive there, then nothing can" is ridiculous and juvenile. We're here on Earth because it suits OUR biochemical needs. Other kinds of life will thrive wherever IT'S needs are met.



posted on Nov, 28 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Very well put and can't argue against that view. There is potential for life in almost every part of the universe



Originally posted by sapien82

Originally posted by bottleslingguy

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
Just to be a Devil's Advocate, all this proves is that once life is on a planet it can adapt to harsh environments. It does not mean it can be STARTED in these harsh environments. Again, just to play Devil's Advocate.


so tell us what you know about starting life?


Yes but whose to say that it didnt start there in the first place , the chances of bacteria and microbes travelling to these regions and then adapting are quite slim !
Its more logical to suggest that they started out there and adapted with the changes as the area changed !


Meteors could transport life anywhere from where it started, plenty of them out there.
edit on 28-11-2012 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)





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