CERN's Large Hadron Collider Reveals New Type of Matter

page: 1
21
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:10 PM
link   
Something unexpected from CERN...

SOURCE


"Somehow they fly at the same direction even though it's not clear how they can communicate their direction with one another. That has surprised many people, including us," says MIT physics professor Gunther Roland, whose group led the analysis of the collision data along with Wei Li, a former MIT postdoc who is now an assistant professor at Rice University. A paper describing the unexpected findings will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review B and is now available on arXiv.




posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:21 PM
link   
Anyone want to put it in laymen terms? Would really like to know what it means. Forgive my ignorance.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:32 PM
link   

While protons at normal energy levels consist of three quarks, they tend to gain an accompanying cluster of gluons at higher energy levels. These gluons exist as both particles and waves, and their wave functions can be correlated with each other. This "quantum entanglement" explains how the particles that fly away from the collision can share information such as direction of flight path, Venugopalan says. The correlation is "a very tiny effect, but it's pointing to something very fundamental about how quarks and gluons are arranged spatially within a proton


Gluons( /ˈɡluːɒnz/; from English glue) are elementary particles that act as the exchange particles (or gauge bosons) for the strong force between quarks, analogous to the exchange of photons in the electromagnetic force between two charged particles.

Right now it seems this discovery is highly observational, with little explanation.. The most important thing about this, to me, is the fact that physics is a changing science and there are types of matter with unexplained properties.

As we are able to observe more high energy collisions between fundamental particles, we may find that there is a plethora of undiscovered types of matter.


the collisions yield hundreds of new particles, most of which fly away from the collision point at close to the speed of light.


An unbelievable amount of energy is at play in these experiments, and there are implications in multiple fields.

The LHC is probably the greatest experiment in our history, with antimatter, Higgs boson, and more coming..
edit on 11/27/2012 by PatrickGarrow17 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:36 PM
link   
Interesting.

I can't understand how there can be a new kind tho. Matter, anti-matter...ok.

New matter? I can't wait to hear what this about.


Peace



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:36 PM
link   
This is extremely interesting. Thank you for posting this.

I have not heard of this theoretical matter: Color-glass condensate. en.wikipedia.org...

I need to go explore this more. Thanks again for posting!

S & F!



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 12:53 PM
link   
reply to post by TheProphetMark
 


When it comes to quantum physics there is very little that is easily explained in "layman's" terms. But the link provide by mcx1942 in THIS POST comes as close as I think you can get to a layman's explanation.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 01:37 PM
link   
I believe the deeper humanity delves into the quantum world, the more of these "unexplainable" particles they are going to find.

My personal belief is that there is, at some level, physical evidence of thought creating matter; Or even observation collapsing wavelengths into reality. Perhaps all these newly found particles and properties of such particles are just that, the physical evidence of how consciousness interacts with reality on a sub-atomic and quantum level.


Either way, I'm waving goodbye to the digital era of information, and embracing the new quantum age with open arms. Can anyone imagine the sort of discoveries that will be made 30 years from now? Absolutely unimaginable.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 03:04 PM
link   
Does someone want to enlighten me a little as to how this works?
How is this matter collided, in a quick burst, or is it a constant stream? How long does the actual 'experiment' that produces the data run for, a split second?
Do they just use the empty air, or a certain gas?
How is the matter accelerated, what pushes it? Is there a 'collison area' or do the collisions take place anywhere in the collider? Does the matter have to circle around a few times to achieve momentum, and is there a second circle running at the same time in opposition, and then the two are collided?
Is there a huge amount of energy involved?



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 03:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Vortiki
 


Advancements in quantum physics will more likely expand the digital age than destroy it.


TextA quantum computer would not just be a traditional computer built out of different parts, but a machine that would exploit the laws of quantum physics to perform certain information processing tasks in a spectacularly more efficient manner
Paper on Quantum Computing


Quantum physics is much more than what spiritualists focus on. Although I do agree that there is potential along the lines of physical thought interaction as well.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 03:10 PM
link   
reply to post by jude11
 


Just pretend to believe them, new matter what they say.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 04:43 PM
link   
All well and good i suppose, But....How will this affect the price of rice in China?
thats the big question science needs to answer......WTF next? How much is that one gonna cost?And will we ever meet the famous higgs boson or not?
And if we do.....how will that affect the price of......well.....



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 07:29 PM
link   
reply to post by happykat39
 


I read/skimmed the article.... do they mention what type of lead ion? any way lead is atomic number 82.. so depending on the type of lead ion, it would either have 82 protons, or 82 electrons... lots of stuff being smashed to bits there...

so when they smash this atom,, they dont expect all the quarks in all those protons to have components right? because quarks are fundamental particles along with electrons?

so what are they searching for? seeing how these fundamental quantum particle/functions "mesh" with one another once out of atoms, with high energy? or are there more components then just electrons,protons and neutrons to an atom?



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 07:38 PM
link   
reply to post by ImaFungi
 





or are there more components then just electrons,protons and neutrons to an atom?


No, that is all there is at the atomic scale. But when you go sub atomic and start breaking those three particles up is when you start getting an absolute alphabet soup of other particles such as the hadrons, quarks and such.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 07:57 PM
link   
reply to post by delusion
 





Does someone want to enlighten me a little as to how this works? How is this matter collided, in a quick burst, or is it a constant stream?

There are two streams composed of short bursts that run in opposite directions and are brought together in one or more of the four main detectors.


How long does the actual 'experiment' that produces the data run for, a split second?

The bursts last for a very short time and the computing power needed to poll the detectors and process the data is truly amazing.


Do they just use the empty air, or a certain gas?

The accelerator rings are evacuated of all air and are held in a state of high vacuum.


How is the matter accelerated, what pushes it?

Very powerful superconducting electromagnets are switched on and off at extremely high speeds to accelerate the particles. They are pushed by the magnets behind them and pulled by the magnets ahead of them. that is why they use particle packets. It is actually quite similar to the way the magnets in a maglev train work to propel the train down the tracks, but at enormously higher rates.


Is there a 'collison area' or do the collisions take place anywhere in the collider?

There are four main areas where the two counter rotating packets of particles are brought together for the collisions. Until then they are running in two separate rings. Each area has a different type of detector.


Does the matter have to circle around a few times to achieve momentum, and is there a second circle running at the same time in opposition, and then the two are collided?

Yes, the particle packets are run around the rings at increasingly higher speeds until they reach the desired velocity expressed as TEV's or Tera Electron Volts. (Tera = trillion)


Is there a huge amount of energy involved?

Yes, the power consumed by the experiments could power a fair sized town.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 09:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by happykat39



Very powerful superconducting electromagnets are switched on and off at extremely high speeds to accelerate the particles. They are pushed by the magnets behind them and pulled by the magnets ahead of them. that is why they use particle packets. It is actually quite similar to the way the magnets in a maglev train work to propel the train down the tracks, but at enormously higher rates.



does the electromagnetic energy factor into the results of the experiment in any way?

also regarding your reply to my response... you said there are other aspects to the atom beyond atomic...
im guessing the composition of proton and neutron ( quarks)... but also the strong and weak nuclear force.... where does the function of this force come from? when proton and neutron are united in atom surrounded by electron,, they automatically create some special reaction of "new/different stuff" known as the strong and weak force.. which is mediated by "real.. or virtual? particles"? is the strong and weak force some exotic form of special energy,,, and is that some of what they are peering into when they smash atoms? because neutrons and protons are just made of quarks right... and quarks arent made of anything right? but if quarks are separated from their atomicness,, everything just changes into different things? how do you envision whats really going on here?



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:10 PM
link   
reply to post by ImaFungi
 





does the electromagnetic energy factor into the results of the experiment in any way?


WOW, so many questions and so little time to answer them all. But as to this one I believe that the detectors for the experiments are in a straight section of the accelerator that doesn't need the superconducting magnets wrapped around it to keep it on track for that short distance, however there are some special magnets around the detectors to actually influence the particles and show their magnetic characteristics.

Here is a very good site to visit for more answers to your questions.

A SUBATOMIC VENTURE

There are many links on the site to explore a ton of different aspects of the Large hadron Collider.

I should also add that there are the four main detectors but there are also several auxiliary detectors as well.
edit on 27-11-2012 by happykat39 because: typo



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:19 PM
link   

Originally posted by happykat39

...
The accelerator rings are evacuated of all air and are held in a state of high vacuum.
...
Yes, the particle packets are run around the rings at increasingly higher speeds until they reach the desired velocity expressed as TEV's or Tera Electron Volts. (Tera = trillion)


Awesome information thanks. I'm still having trouble picturing what it is they actually collide though...

You say there is a state of high vaccuum - is that what is collided, or is that just the medium through which the 'bullets' move?

The 'particle packets', what are they comprised of, and how are they 'held' and pushed, is it just magnetic fields acting on the particle's fields?
How do they determine the particles they want to use in the study pre-collision are present? (I understand new particles can be made after the collision and they study those too).
Could they just use one single simple element, like hydrogen, and find all the information they needed from it, or would different elements give different results? I imagine on the particle level anything, even empty space, contains most every type of particle?

Edit... Ah, Maybe I should look at that website then...
edit on 27-11-2012 by delusion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:24 PM
link   
Interesting..... thank you for the link... will read about it in the morning. Its exciting.

It does not surprise me there are new forms of matter (if that is what it is) being discovered..... we are so primitive in knowledge but thanks to experiments like these we can learn.

The thing is... IS humanity worth our species survival, by what we find. If we somehow unleash some crazy particle.. ya know? We may not live to talk about it.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:25 PM
link   
I think apple should buy the new matter name and call it iMatter



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:29 PM
link   
My theory is this:Using the Hadron Collider the Scientist's are looking for the building blocks ( code ) of matter. Forget all the mumbo jumbo and look at it this way, just as the genome project maps DNA protein sequences and determines the physical effect these proteins are arranged like red hair ect.. the Scientists here are looking for something similar in matter.





top topics
 
21
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join