Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Two astronauts to spend a whole year on the International Space Station

page: 1
3

log in

join

posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:07 AM
link   
Well, technically, a cosmonaut and an astronaut.
www.nasa.gov...



NASA, the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and their international partners have selected two veteran spacefarers for a one-year mission aboard the International Space Station in 2015. This mission will include collecting scientific data important to future human exploration of our solar system. NASA has selected Scott Kelly and Roscosmos has chosen Mikhail Kornienko.

Kelly and Kornienko will launch aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in spring 2015 and will land in Kazakhstan in spring 2016. Kelly and Kornienko already have a connection; Kelly was a backup crew member for the station's Expedition 23/24 crews, where Kornienko served as a flight engineer.

The goal of their yearlong expedition aboard the orbiting laboratory is to understand better how the human body reacts and adapts to the harsh environment of space. Data from the 12-month expedition will help inform current assessments of crew performance and health and will determine better and validate countermeasures to reduce the risks associated with future exploration as NASA plans for missions around the moon, an asteroid and ultimately Mars.


If I'm not mistaken, this is going to be a first, and a real step towards the long-term occupation in space. I'm excited, but also worried about their physical state when they return to Earth. Kornienko will be 56 then, and from what I've seen in post-flight videos, it makes you look much older and frail.




posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:23 AM
link   
I think this ISS one-year mission is going to find that there are severe roadblocks to a 2-year Mars mission, part of it spent in zero-g (the travel time to and from the planet) and part of it in 38%-g (the time spent on the planet).

An ideal spacecraft used for a long-term mission (such as a mission to Mars) would have at least a portion of it with artificial gravity created by centrifugal force produced by spinning the module. Perhaps each astronaut could spend part of their day within this spinning module to help alleviate the physiological problems caused by the lack of gravity.

However, to do that would most likely be cost prohibitive.

edit on 11/27/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:23 AM
link   
Is this a step up from the 520 day mission carried out in Russia recently?

www.telegraph.co.uk...

Looks like the Russians will be looking for a suicidal monkey soon. www.telegraph.co.uk...

So who is gona make a guess at when men will be booking their tickets?



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 10:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by dowot
Is this a step up from the 520 day mission carried out in Russia recently?

www.telegraph.co.uk...

Looks like the Russians will be looking for a suicidal monkey soon. www.telegraph.co.uk...

So who is gona make a guess at when men will be booking their tickets?


Sure it's a step up. That 520-day mission was conducted on Earth...with Earth's full gravity.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 05:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
Sure it's a step up. That 520-day mission was conducted on Earth...with Earth's full gravity.
Yes, I think the 437 day record set aboard Mir by Valeri Polyakov would be the one to compare to:

Mir

The Mir programme held the record for the longest uninterrupted human presence in space, at 3,644 days, until 23 October 2010 (when it was surpassed by the ISS),[13] and it currently holds the record for the longest single human spaceflight, of Valeri Polyakov, at 437 days 18 hours.



posted on Nov, 27 2012 @ 11:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I'm thinking they have specific tests in mind to help figure out specific problems with a long-duration mission. We knew less about the effects of zero-g back then, and I think this time they have a better idea what to expect, and can pattern the tests they do around that.



posted on Dec, 5 2012 @ 03:23 PM
link   
Year-Long ISS Expedition Outlined for Media

NASA and Roscosmos officials discuss the scheduled 12-month-long mission of veteran NASA astronaut, Scott Kelly and veteran Russian cosmonaut, Mikhail Kornienko, with media during an International Space Station Program Briefing held in Houston and Star City, Russia.

Participants are: Mike Suffredini, International Space Station program manager; Julie Robinson, International Space Station program scientist; Bob Behnken, NASA chief astronaut; Alexey Krasnov, director of Piloted Space Programs Department, Roscosmos; Sergei Krikalev, director, Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center; and, Igor Ushakov, director, Institute for Biomedical Problems.






top topics



 
3

log in

join