How do Muslims Pray?

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posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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While perusing this thread, www.abovetopsecret.com... I came upon this question, posted by Charles1952.


Originally posted by charles1952
Obviously, colbe's prayer request is addressed to Christians, but I'm curious. Could Muslims ever make a similar prayer?

Colbe's seems to be for all of the inhabitants of Jerusalem and for the city itself. That prayer would include praying for the Muslims, Christians, Atheists, and Jews of the area. Would that sort of prayer be allowed under Islam? I hope so, but I get the idea that a Muslim praying for a Jew might be out of bounds.

Can anyone help me with what a Muslim prayer for Jerusalem might be like?
www.abovetopsecret.com...


It's a really valid question, but it shows just how little we, who have been raised in Christian environments, actually understand how our brothers and sister from across the aisle pray and apply their religion to their daily lives.

We know that Jesus taught Christians how to pray and how not to pray. Although many Christians are deaf to those teachings, shouting condemnation from street corners and praying for cool stuff, instead of peace and healing of the planet. Note: When I was 13, I prayed fervently for boobs.


Catholics have the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross, and almost all Christians celebrate baptism and the Eucharist, or Communion.

So here's my question to Muslims, expanding on the original question posed by Charles:

How do Muslims pray? I understand that you pray several times a day. Are there separate prayers for different times of the day? Are all Muslims reciting the same prayers, all at once, in a unified voice?

Is there room, during these designated prayer times for personal reflection, and listening to an inner message, or answer/acknowledgment that your prayers have been received?

Is there room for, or a time in which you can pray for something personal and specific, like success on an Algebra test?

Will you share your personal spiritual experience through prayer, with us curious ATS members, and overlook our ignorance?

Thanks in advance for your kind responses.




posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


Excellent questions, windword!! I hope you get some traffic, s/f from me
even though I can't answer them.

I remember praying as a little kid "God Bless Mommy and Daddy and ..." then naming every person I knew in my extended family. Aunts, uncles, grandparents, cousins, siblings, etc. By the time I was done (this was bedtime "say your prayers", but I don't recall having to kneel at the bed and doing the praying hands thing -- I just did it after settling in to the covers), I was either nearly asleep, or hoping I didn't leave anyone out. I recall being "afraid" that I left someone out, which I was certain would be a bad thing.
Now that you bring it up, I wonder if that's where some of the problems I have with "things left undone" or "things done that should not have been done" being told to a little kid are harmful.

I also prayed that God would, for just ONE DAY, let me turn into a cat. I even tried to bargain with "Him". Didn't happen, needless to say.


Anyway, good Qs, and I'll keep watch on this thread.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by wildtimes
 





I also prayed that God would, for just ONE DAY, let me turn into a cat. I even tried to bargain with "Him". Didn't happen, needless to say.



HAHA! Yeah. I made many bargains with God too. Usually about prom dates, getting my driver license, etc. I never prayed to be changed into a cat though. Although, I have often said that in my next life I would like to just lay back and be someones pampered house cat!



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by windword

How do Muslims pray? I understand that you pray several times a day. Are there separate prayers for different times of the day? Are all Muslims reciting the same prayers, all at once, in a unified voice?

Is there room, during these designated prayer times for personal reflection, and listening to an inner message, or answer/acknowledgment that your prayers have been received?

Is there room for, or a time in which you can pray for something personal and specific, like success on an Algebra test?



Muslims are commanded to perform prayers five times a day. These prayers are obligatory on every Muslim who have reached the age of puberty, with the exception being those who are mentally ill, too physically ill for it to be possible, menstruating, or experiencing postnatal bleeding. Those who are ill or otherwise physically unable to offer their prayers in the traditional form are permitted to offer their prayers while sitting or lying, as they are able .You have to be clean before each prayer. en.wikipedia.org...
It is the same prayer, so in the mosq all muslims are doing the same thing following the leader who is usually the "imam" or if they are praying in a group outside the mosq it is the person who is wiser/older and know more about religion.
Yes you can pray for a specific thing, during the prayer there's a part/room where you have top say a "dua" (which is i think equal to what a PRAYER means in christianity" "in islam a prayer is not just saying words" en.wikipedia.org... , which is when you pray for something like better grades and so on... , usually in the mosq the leader, "the imam" says the dua which is usually praying for guidance in richness in life and afterlife, and others that are similar to what Christians would say in a general prayer.
edit on 26-11-2012 by 0SolidSnake0 because: quote



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Go to a Mosque and find out! Its not a secret after all. You wont burst into flames upon entry.
edit on 26-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


That's not a very helpful response.
Are you a Muslim that is offended by my question? Or are you just trying to be cute?

This is an ATS discussion forum. If I was to motivated to go to a mosques myslef and speak to some authority there, I would. I'm asking ATS Muslims for their personal viewpoints, experiences and understandings, not just for me, but for posterity and for all who may interested.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by windword
 

well praying it has no time no place and no limitation however some times and some places are better.
but there is a some sort of praying that has it's own specifications and muslims should do it as a duty and as a symbol of worshiping God.
time of this sort of prayer :

And establish prayer at the two ends of the day and at the approach of the night. Indeed, good deeds do away with misdeeds. That is a reminder for those who remember. -Koran 11.114

all of Muslims read these verses in that sort of prayer in Arabic and towards Mecca :


In the name of Allah, the Beneficent, the Merciful (1)
Praise be to Allah, Lord of the Worlds, (2) The Beneficent, the Merciful. (3) Owner of the Day of Judgment, (4) Thee (alone) we worship; Thee (alone) we ask for help. (5) Show us the straight path, (6) The path of those whom Thou hast favoured. Not (the path) of those who earn Thine anger nor of those who go astray. (7) -Koran 1

and the aim of that kind of prayer is this:

Recite that which hath been inspired in thee of the Scripture, and establish worship. Lo! worship preserveth from lewdness and iniquity, but verily remembrance of Allah is more important. And Allah knoweth what ye do. Koran 29-45

however there are more details I ignored that but the point is that if we all from any monotheistic religion would pray from our hearts and adhere to our beliefs then world would be better ! there is no religion which prescribes killing innocents, annoying neighbours or telling lies.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


Go to a Mosque and find out! Its not a secret after all. You wont burst into flames upon entry.

First, let me say that I appreciate why windword posted this here, and it's perfectly appropriate.

Still, your suggestion (aside from its obvious tone) is inherently a good one. While ATS is my chosen venue for investigating these things, AND I'm very interested in what other members HERE have to say and tell me, going to a religious service (or ritual or gathering or sweat-lodge or tent revival or witch's prayer circle) is an EXCELLENT way to learn what others do in these matters.

BUT, and it's a big one, if a person is not mature enough, or confident enough in their own beliefs and methods, doing so can be a mistake. I was in my early teens when a friend invited me to her Southern Baptist church and I got permission from my mom to go. It was TERRIFYING. There's a difference between have a journalistic curiosity and being able to stay objective - an observer only - and being a vulnerable "drifter" religiously. One must consider how what one is "entering" is likely to affect their sensibilities.

Someone terrified of snakes, for example, would not probably be comfy in a snake-handling ceremony. Someone who has shaky self-esteem will no doubt be affected adversely by the "you're a sinner and going to hell!" ...
and so on.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by windword
reply to post by andy06shake
 


That's not a very helpful response.
Are you a Muslim that is offended by my question? Or are you just trying to be cute?

This is an ATS discussion forum. If I was to motivated to go to a mosques myslef and speak to some authority there, I would. I'm asking ATS Muslims for their personal viewpoints, experiences and understandings, not just for me, but for posterity and for all who may interested.


No im not Muslim, my partner is through(Non practicing). Im not trying to be awkward with you. I think if you are interested in how this particular religion prays then the best way to find out would be to do as i suggested and pay a visit to a Mosque. Get your information from the horse's mouth so to speak, seems logical to me mate. How much more helpful can i be after all i just provided you with a solution.
edit on 26-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by maes2
 


When Muslims pray, do they sometimes hear God's voice, or feel God's presence, directing them or answering them, as Christians sometimes claim?

Christian preachers often present sermons based on personal revelation of life experiences or of the meaning of scriptures. Is this something that Muslims also share?



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


"When Muslims pray, do they sometimes hear God's voice, or feel God's presence, directing them or answering them, as Christians sometimes claim?"

Only the the schizophrenic crazy ones. The rest are just like you and i.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by wildtimes
 


All im saying is that if you want to learn about the Muslim belief system then a Mosque is your first port of call IMHO of course. I mean if i wanted to learn about Mars bars i would goto Cadbury's!
edit on 26-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by 0SolidSnake0
 


Nicely Explained Sir!!



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by windword
 

well no. hearing the voice of God is only related to prophets like Abraham, Moses, Jesus (muslims believe that Jesus is a prophet and he is alive but never died or curified) and Mohammad.
no other person can hear the voice of God even the twelve Imams of Shia. maybe you mean enlightenment there are such concepts in any religion even Buddhists but no even enlightened persons should not say this because it is like claiming being a prophet so it is forbidden but yes there are people which claimed such things in the history and among muslims but it is regarded a big sin in Islam or some sort of misdirection of enlightened people.
edit on 26-11-2012 by maes2 because: (no reason given)
edit on 26-11-2012 by maes2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


I don't think that's fair. I consider myself to be a spiritual person, and I can say that I have felt what I can only describe as God's presence. I have, recently, prayed for inspiration in my career, and have been presented with creative ideas in my dreams that I give thanks for to something outside myself.

You can chalk it up to mental illness or personal self determinism, but many call it a spiritual experience.

All religions are derived from something someone thought was a spiritual experience.



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


Each to there own pal. I was referring more to the hearing God's voice comment in your post. If you think you feel gods presence when you pray thats cool. Is that not how its supposed to work? LoL

If however you actually hear Gods voice. Then thats a different story.
edit on 26-11-2012 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by maes2
 


When I read poetry, like "The Prophet" by Kahlil Gibran, I am moved by it's simplistic beauty, truth and profundity. Is this considered an Allah inspired work? I know it isn't scripture. But isn't a kind of inspired hymn?

It seems as if this poet experienced a channeled revelation from his God. Am I wrong to make this assumption?

NOTE: I am able to find numerous sites that display "The Prophet" book in total, but I can't link a single one of them here?????

Is this a controversial book?



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by windword
reply to post by andy06shake
 

I don't think that's fair. I consider myself to be a spiritual person, and I can say that I have felt what I can only describe as God's presence. I have, recently, prayed for inspiration in my career, and have been presented with creative ideas in my dreams that I give thanks for to something outside myself.
You can chalk it up to mental illness or personal self determinism, but many call it a spiritual experience.
All religions are derived from something someone thought was a spiritual experience.

so you are a faithful man but I did not deny spiritual experiences or mysticism you said can anybody hear the sound of God and I said I did not believe in that and it is like claiming being a prophet.
surely you can have spiritual experiences and it is not mental illness at all. but would you explain your experience more? surely you can feel the presence of God but how do you know that God has spoken to you ?



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by maes2
 





so you are a faithful man but I did not deny spiritual experiences or mysticism you said can anybody hear the sound of God and I said I did not believe in that and it is like claiming being a prophet.
surely you can have spiritual experiences and it is not mental illness at all. but would you explain your experience more? surely you can feel the presence of God but how do you know that God has spoken to you ?


Sure. One time, I was sitting watching the sunset on a serene beach. I was overcome with a sense of peace and wholeness. It was accompanied by a whispering confirmation that was as old and familiar as the wind and the gentle washing waves.

I was startled by this experience, and as I began to analyze my perception, it began to slip away. I thought "Don't go!" And I got, a for lack of a better term, spiritually audible answer. "I'm not the one leaving, you are."

I strive to achieve that moment again.

My career was in crisis, as I suffered an injury and can't work at my career of 35 years anymore. I'm beginning a small, home based arts and crafts business. I often have nightmares that reflect anxiety and fear of failure. When I purposefully present my anxiety upon a make believe alter and pray for inspiration, I regularly recieve dreams that present vivid visions of perfectly made colorful items.

Then I go research how to make them, the next days. I have since done several craft fairs and my online shop has gone interstate and now international! Whoop Whoop!

edit on 26-11-2012 by windword because: spelling



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by windword
reply to post by maes2
 

When I read poetry, like "The Prophet" by Kahlil Gibran, I am moved by it's simplistic beauty, truth and profundity. Is this considered an Allah inspired work? I know it isn't scripture. But isn't a kind of inspired hymn?

well I was not familiar with that book I read some summary about that in wikipedia it seems that it is about Self-awareness that a person can experience such concepts. it was controversial because Ottoman empire was against that. because muslims think that such books are to questioning the prophecy of Mohammad and to shape that like a spiritual experience.






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