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Jurassic Park experiment a success after 500 million-year bacteria bought back to life

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posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by QueenofWeird

Originally posted by Ryanssuperman

Originally posted by QueenofWeird



This is how the continents looked.

and this is about what lived, en.wikipedia.org...
There were even no mammals existing when this bacteria lived...

I think you're reading your own evidence wrong. The scale on the Wikipedia page you linked is in millions of years. It clearly states there was land animals at 500 million years ago, and multicellular life at 1000 million years ago.


I am talking about mammals and not animals in general...and I do read the chart in the right way


Complex multicellular life existed 1000 million years ago, so I guess I'm missing the point of your first post. Cher didn't exist until 1946, but that has no relevance to this thread, so why would I mention it?




posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by Ryanssuperman
 


Mr Bad Mood I was merely trying to make clear what was there and not when Germ was alive. Like 500 million years ago is very long ago and MAMMALS didn't even exist then. Geez Louise give me a break



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by QueenofWeird
We humans seem to have this desire to tamper with things we do not understand
Sure that does lead to cool new things. But it would be hilarious if some ancient germ resurrected out of the mist of time would get on the loose and kill us off.


I look forward to it.

How else are we going to get to have a zombie apocalypse?




posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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Oh dear, the wieners have landed.

It's not if, it's when. We've been very lucky up to this point that the Level 4's have held and the loons have abstained.

The Hot Zone - Richard Preston: Read about Reston, Virginia. Then apologize.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by Ryanssuperman
 


"and multicellular life at 1000 million years ago."

So.... a billion years ago?

edit on 11/24/12 by s0l4rn1ghtm4r3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by Ryanssuperman

Originally posted by PrplHrt
What possible good can come of reviving an extinct bacteria? No one has a resistance to it. These fools could wipe out civilization.


This is an unfounded, sensationalized claim. You have no proof of this ... you just watch too many movies.


I must watch too many movies too because scientists make me nervous when they start screwing around with things.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by Night Star
 

Yeah, things turned out the way they did for a reason. There's a good reason that bacteria has been dead so long. Like Goldblum said in "Jurassic Park", that bacteria had its chance and nature selected it for extinction.

We start messing around with the program and we'll crash the computer.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by PrplHrt
 

Yes, but don't forget, another citation from that movie: "Life will find the way."



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

This is ignorant alarmist Chicken Little-ism.

As if none of this is done without safety protocols.


Look ma no gloves! Or proper containment. Picture is from the original article. There are other pictures that just show gloves for protection, and no protective hood or clothing etc. Plus it seems that this new strain is mutating itself to be much stronger and healthier than todays bacterial strains.

By the way, you wouldn't catch me handling modern day bacteria without gloves, mask, and disposable lab coat. If the bacteria is dangerous, then a hood is used. For something of this magnitude, I think they would need to take even bigger steps than this. And oh yeah, that room looks no different than any other filthy lab. Wonder if they cover their mouths when they sneeze? Is that dirt under his nails? Eww...


Jurassic Park in a Petri dish: Scientists bring 500 million-year-old bacteria back to life - what could possibly go wrong?




edit on 24-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by zilebeliveunknown
 

Remember how it found a way. We opened the door by engineering it in the lab. We interfered with nature.

I suppose you could bend the rules and say that's how it found the way, but that's stretching it.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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Having read the article and the responses the following can be stated:

The marvels of modern science offers the greatest in wonders and in horrors that we have yet to see. While many predict gloom and doom, the question is what if, and that is a powerful question. What if, and add any number of statements and it would boggle the mind. While I do agree that it is a scary thought about what if it gets out, on the flip side of this, is what if it leads to a cure? There are diseases and problems that has arrisen from our modern day world with no cure in sight, and this could lead to a possiblity that we see many modern age plagues eliminated as the research could give clues on how to counteract if not eliminate those diseases.

And old ones that are popping up, having definately mutated, such as the flesh eating virus, as it did start off as a simple staff infection, mutated to counteract the antibiotics used to eliminate such. It mutated ane evolved to counter at that, other diseases and bacteria that once was thought to have been beaten are now coming back with a vengence, and are starting to rear their ugly heads again with no sign of a cure, and the experts are at a loss to counteract if not cure such.

With any new development or technologie that comes out, be it through a modern marvel or even bringing back something that had died out, always has its risk and a trade off on such.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by elouina

Originally posted by Druscilla

This is ignorant alarmist Chicken Little-ism.

As if none of this is done without safety protocols.


Look ma no gloves! Or proper containment. Picture is from the original article. There are other pictures that just show gloves for protection, and no protective hood or clothing etc. Plus it seems that this new strain is mutating itself to be much stronger and healthier than todays bacterial strains.



Are your pictures photos of the actual sample?
If so, have you considered that there is likely zero airborne contamination risk? possibly even purposely designed into the bacteria as a precaution?

Whatever the case, as said before, why all the alarm?
We can't have a zombie apocalypse until something spooky escapes the lab, and we all want a zombie apocalypse, so, come on.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla
Are your pictures photos of the actual sample?
If so, have you considered that there is likely zero airborne contamination risk? possibly even purposely designed into the bacteria as a precaution?

Whatever the case, as said before, why all the alarm?
We can't have a zombie apocalypse until something spooky escapes the lab, and we all want a zombie apocalypse, so, come on.




Yes they are of the actual samples. Airborn or not, bare hands says it all. I have a degree in microbiology and I wouldn't go anywhere near any bacteria without gloves and a lab coat. And this strain most definately requires extra precautions. Along with the fact that is is a new super strain of ecoli on steroids. And did you see the breeding ground under that mans nails? By looking at this lax handling, I feel it could be "out there" already. This is the equivlent of Homer Simpson running a nuclear reactor. I am not a doom and gloom person with microbes since I have seen it all, but this is downright reckless and negligant.
edit on 24-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 11:28 PM
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I remember the thread where they claimed anything beyond 6.8 million years could not be brought back due to DNA having a 521 year half life.

Dinos' DNA Demise: Genetic Material Has a 521-Year Half-Life

I said in that thread they would be proven wrong.



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by QueenofWeird
 


Imagine the stuff going on that isn't being made public.



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 01:31 AM
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I hate how the microbiologists use E. coli as their guinea pig.

E. coli is all over humans and everything we touch. It lives in our poop and is everywhere people are.

So now they splice up an extinct one with a living one to see how it might evolve, just to see what could happen.

Now they have a super E. coli on their hands (literally) and what might that be good for? Oh, I don't know, maybe a new biological weapon?

I doubt it will be used for any kind of cure or as a benefit to mankind.
edit on 25-11-2012 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Clairity



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 02:33 AM
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Originally posted by MichiganSwampBuck
I hate how the microbiologists use E. coli as their guinea pig.

E. coli is all over humans and everything we touch. It lives in our poop and is everywhere people are.

So now they splice up an extinct one with a living one to see how it might evolve, just to see what could happen.

Now they have a super E. coli on their hands (literally) and what might that be good for? Oh, I don't know, maybe a new biological weapon?

I doubt it will be used for any kind of cure or as a benefit to mankind.
edit on 25-11-2012 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Clairity


Why is this super e. coli?



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 07:35 AM
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I am on the side that thinks no good can come from bringing back such ancient bacteria into a world which has not been exposed to said bacteria for a long, long time.
We have a hard enough time keeping on top of bacteria already present in the world.

What I want to know is why? Why bring back long extinct bacteria - I cannot understand for what purpose?



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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Great, we're all going to die.



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


Why do I say super E. coli?

Here is a couple quotes form the article.

"The new 'chimeric' bacteria has mutated rapidly - and some have become stronger and healthier than today's germs."

also

"Not only did the fitness levels increase to nearly modern-day levels, but also some of the altered lineages actually became healthier than their modern counterpart."

The full article is here www.dailymail.co.uk... html
edit on 25-11-2012 by MichiganSwampBuck because: added quote and link to original article





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