Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Scientists unearth an ancient city of Wu

page: 1
46
<<   2 >>

log in

join
+21 more 
posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 11:55 AM
link   
Scientists unearth an ancient city of Wu

It is probably the largest ancient city relics from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) ever known in China, according to Chen Jun, director of Suzhou Archaeological Institute, though he adds it is still too soon for a final conclusion.

"It is extremely rare to see such complete relics of a Spring and Autumn city in this highly developed area of southern Jiangsu province," Chen says.



Farmers laboring here have taken them for granted for generations. However, when an archaeological team took a look in 2009, they found this to be the remains of an ancient city moat. Further investigation unveiled an underground city with more than 2,400 years' history.

The team, from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Suzhou Archaeological Institute, has recently finished the first stage of study. Based on that, the expanse of the site ranges 6,728 meters from north to south and 6,820 meters from east to west, covering an area of 24.79 sq km.


Exciting news.

This is a very interesting and fascinating story out of China.

For many who follow such breaking stories from around the globe, China's release of information always seems to be painstakingly slow at times. This find should give us a wonderful glimpse into many aspects of this period in China's history. Here we have a whole city from the period to explore. I'm looking forward to viewing relics and learning what else they will undoubtedly uncover.

As always stay tuned.




posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 12:01 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Always interesting in these "ancient" finds.

Especially when the discoveries include mechanical, medical, cultural insights that are relavent today.




posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 12:16 PM
link   
Intersting find Slayer!

Comment on systems


The Chinese scientific community still suffers under the lingering effects of the Soviet style GAIMK structure (sorry don't recall the Chinese name for the institute that monitors all scientific endeavours), it tends to slow thing down because an added layer of bureaucracy

Most western archaeology follows the following pattern

University, institute, individual, government sponsors, archaeologist excavates, report goes to publisher, peer review, published

GAIMK style systems

Government determines site to be excavated, allocates to university or instiute, but stating who will do it, archaeologists escavates, send report to university, university sends report to bureaucracy, bureaucracy manages it, publishes
edit on 23/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:08 PM
link   
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks for the explanation.
Now, hopefully someday preferably soon they'll streamline that convoluted fiasco.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Thanks for the explanation.
Now, hopefully someday preferably soon they'll streamline that convoluted fiasco.


Well it was designed to sweep out bourgeoisie ideas and support the concept of class struggle in ancient societies. The East German's archaeologists who grew up in such a system have written about it. I always think of how it worked when people bringing up suppression of archaeological ideas - it takes a big organization and it doesn't work very well AND its in plain sight



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:59 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 



Farmers laboring here have taken them for granted for generations. However, when an archaeological team took a look in 2009, they found this to be the remains of an ancient city moat. Further investigation unveiled an underground city with more than 2,400 years' history.

Slayer, am I reading this right? At least some of this city was built underground, and used for approx. 2400 years? Or are they saying it has just been buried by time? If the former, I find that quite interesting to say the least.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:03 PM
link   
reply to post by Klassified
 


I'm assuming it's a reference to the fact that is was buried all this time not necessarily an "Underground city" could simply be open to interpretation to the English wording considering it's a Chinese website



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by Klassified


Slayer, am I reading this right? At least some of this city was built underground, and used for approx. 2400 years? Or are they saying it has just been buried by time? If the former, I find that quite interesting to say the least.



I'll take that statement as an artifact of translation from Mandarin to English


Further investigation unveiled an underground city with more than 2,400 years' history


I think he meant that they excavated a city that had a history going back 2,400 years, IMHO. He may have used the term 地下城; which I believe means something underground but uncovered or underground but you have access too....but that's a wild guess
edit on 23/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:39 PM
link   
I think you're both right. Just a quirk of translation. I was about to get doubly interested if this was another underground city with that kind of history. But I'm still not disappointed. An awesome find just as it is.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:58 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Man stuff like this is so exciting and who better could we have, on top of all these new revelations and finds, that seem to be growing in frequency as of late ? Slayer, do you believe, archaeologists are making more discoveries more frequently, with the advent of ground penetrating radar in the last decade. Or are these finds more attributed to research and/or just happenstance. Somebody trips over the point of a monument sticking out of the ground ?

SnF
edit on 23-11-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:03 PM
link   
Fantastic! I have a couple books on this subject, now I have some more reading to do. In a few years when more is discovered, I hope they find some kind of story from that city. Maybe more doomsday pron! Joking aside, I wonder what lies beneath the Earth.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:06 PM
link   
reply to post by randyvs
 


I think the newer tools help but to be honest I think it has more to do with more people moving into areas that we haven't either ventured much {or not at all} or haven't been to in a long period of time. I'm convinced that there is still much more to be discovered yet due to mainly not looking in locations which we may not have considered to be possible sites and or locations to investigate before.

AND...

Of course those now submerged ancient coastlines.......



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:39 PM
link   
Maybe now we can learn why the Waponi's loved Orange Soda so much!!... Was the city destroyed by a volcano? Maybe the sacrifice wasn't good enough...

This could also mean a big boost in technological advancement - since we should have an unlimited supply of 'Bubaru', allowing us to make cutting edge semi-conductors...

I thought it was spelled Waponi Woo, instead of Wu... hmm maybe an oversight there...

Really... it seems like there are a lot of discoveries being talked about lately... more than usual anyway.

The 'undiscovered island' thread is one of them.... reminds me of the cities discovered that were previously thought to be mythical. It also makes me wonder if, since we are still finding ancient sites and cities on the surface, 'what is left hidden below the oceans' surface?'.



edit on 23-11-2012 by esteay812 because: tyops



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 06:50 PM
link   
on related news, wu tang clan just applied for a visa on the grounds of wanting to return to their ancestral home.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 07:18 PM
link   
Wu is the region from which the Art of War was originated and this find stems from the same period in history, hopefully there may be some finds which provide more clarity on the matter.

Sun Tzu
en.wikipedia.org...


Sun Wu (simplified Chinese: 孙武; traditional Chinese: 孫武; pinyin: Sūn Wǔ), style name Changqing (長卿), better known as Sun Tzu or Sunzi[1] (simplified Chinese: 孙子; traditional Chinese: 孫子; pinyin: Sūnzǐ; pronounced [swə́n tsɨ̀]), was an ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher who is traditionally believed to be the author of The Art of War, an influential ancient Chinese book on military strategy. Sun Tzu has had a significant impact on Chinese and Asian history and culture, both as an author of The Art of War and through legend.

Sun Tzu, also known as Sun Tze or Sun Wu in other translations, was a historical figure whose authenticity is questioned by historians. This is a Chinese name which would usually mean the family name comes first however "Zi" (子; "Tzu" in Wade-Giles transliteration) was used as a suffix for the family name of a respectable man in ancient Chinese culture. In this case, 子 "Tzu" is not the personal or family name. It is a rough equivalent to "Sir" and is commonly translated into English as "Master". Traditional accounts place him in the Spring and Autumn Period of China (722–481 BC) as a military general serving under King Helü of Wu, who lived c. 544–496 BC. Modern scholars accepting his historicity place the completion of The Art of War in the Warring States Period (476–221 BC), based on the descriptions of warfare in the text, and on the similarity of text's prose to other works completed in the early Warring States period.[2]


I personally hope for some finds providing a deeper understanding of the local religious beliefs of the region (and translate it to English) as I have been having a hard time finding detailed translations and literature on the subject. Maybe my local libraries are just lacking in the area.

Does anyone know of some good academic (ie: sourced) reference materials on the subject? I am most interested in the celestial interpretations and timing of the ceremonies of the populations.

Thanks Slayer, you are always quick to keep us updated on these matters.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:52 PM
link   
reply to post by randyvs
 


Thanks for the feedback
Interesting perspective



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 09:30 PM
link   


First thing I thought about when I saw the title.



edit on 23-11-2012 by Trustfund because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 09:51 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Most likely it was Mu, but a nail fell out of one side of the "M" on the sign and it flipped over.


Star for you on this one Slayer. Couldn't help the joke.

Harte



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 09:51 PM
link   
interesting ... china always slow to release the information as they want to protect the sites and artifacts in them .. theft of artifacts and selling them to collecters is a big problem and china is trying to stop the practice along with recover artifacts that were stolen and sold... the theft and sale of ancient artifacts is a problem many countries face....



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 10:03 PM
link   
reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


My first thought was of him. And then I wondered if there was any damage to the city that may have been caused by battle as Wu is very prominent in both Sun Tzu and Sun Bin's version 150 years later during Te Warring States Era. Sun Bin's tactics favor prominently in the 36 Stratagem's. But this does make me wonder if it was a Wu city or one built by Yue after they defeated Wu and moved in which was in 473 BC.

Hopefully the library is found well preserved so that there might be a complete manuscript or two found. Or at least some records to narrow down whose city this was.






top topics



 
46
<<   2 >>

log in

join