What do flatlanders do to prepare for the coming collapse?

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posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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While a member on ATS I have followed survival threads with great interest. Everyone talks about bugging out, or stocking up on food and water, typically storing in in a basement. My impression is these people have a place to run to, such as a cabin in the woods, or the hills.
My question is this. What about those of us who live in the flatlands? Forget a basement for storage. It will stay full of water in the middle of a drought. And we are too far from any “safe place” to run to.
What suggestions do the survivalists and preppers have for those of us who live in the flat lands? Any serious suggestions will be greatly appreciated.




posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:39 AM
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Also another question to add to this would be if SHTF and you were on the flats would you need to move to a new position closer to the coasts/hills/mountains?
edit on 23-11-2012 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:39 AM
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reply to post by kettlebellysmith
 


This is a pretty fair question.

What weather do you get?
What area are you in?
I would like to suggest using your attic but if you are in a hurricane region than forget it.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


I'm living in NE Arkansas, about 5 miles from the Mississippi River. Our past few summers have been hotter than He**, and our winters are varible. Temps in the winter may occaisonly as low as zero, but usuallythe lowest temps are in the teens to the twentys. I'm not in hurricane regions, but I live in tornado alley, and no I don't have a tornado shelter, although I am thinking about installing one. Wouldn't be much good for bugout though. In my area they have to be built above ground, the covered with dirt. Otherwise they fill with water and snakes.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:20 AM
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reply to post by kettlebellysmith
 


I think the answer to your question is in your reply.
Build a tornado shelter that WOULD be good for a bugout situation,build it above ground and cover it with alot of dirt.
Sorry buddy...its 5:20 AM here and i have not had a coffee or completely woken up yet,thats the best I can do right now.

Also,water and snakes means food and water.
Just boil the water.
edit on 23-11-2012 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 05:28 AM
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You need to be at least 250 miles from the ocean; at least 650' above sea level. If you are not meeting these criteria, then move.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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I think perhaps, build a fort. Put a bug out shelter in there for drinking water and snake steaks.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 07:59 AM
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I live in wisconsin,
about 960 to 1200 ft elevation,,
weather is really never bad.. a few tornadoes once in an while, at least in my
southeast corner of the state.
unless we have a "biblical" flood.. we are rather safe..
Sooo, what is there to prepare for? and define flatlanders



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by kettlebellysmith
 


As many problems as benefits come with heading to the mountains. I have always felt that the idea was to escape population centers more than gain elevation. A basement that always has water could well mean that thirst, always among the first of survival considerations, would not be much of an issue. While it may be said that a floodplain or coastal area is a long term risk from flooding flat landers in general should with some consideration find themselves in a position to survive as well as any other. More likely than not the benefits of familiarity with an area outweigh the benefits gained by moving to a possibly advantageous yet unfamiliar location.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:15 AM
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Gotta agree with iforget, unless you get massive flooding, stay where are. If you already know an area, you will be more likely to find food, water, etc. Bugging out to a unfamiliar area will only make it harder. While I don't think 12/21 is going to be The Big One, one look at the rising prices of food tells me it may get a lot worse before it gets better. If you feel you just have to get out of there, start planning where to go, then go there and get the lay of the land. But, be ready, if you think it's a good spot, chances are someone else will too.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 


Flatlander: Someone who lives in an area where the difinition of a hill is an indian mound.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:24 AM
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Did I mention I also live on top of the New Madrid fault? Of course,If an earthquake occurs like the ones in 1811-12, then we're all screwed. LOL
I am apprecitive of the comments and look forward to more suggestions.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 08:54 AM
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Originally posted by kettlebellysmith
reply to post by Lil Drummerboy
 


Flatlander: Someone who lives in an area where the difinition of a hill is an indian mound.

we cheeseheads call anyone from illinois a flatlander.. or at least that is the nicer of the names

You live on the Madrid fault huh?
you may as well live in tornado ally, almost seems silly to build a shelter in a potential disaster zone..
edit on 23-11-2012 by Lil Drummerboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by rollsthepaul
You need to be at least 250 miles from the ocean; at least 650' above sea level. If you are not meeting these criteria, then move.


How far from the great lake would you have to be on average.
Or large lake any formula



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 
Great lake? Forget it. I live in northeast Arkaansas, I'm five miles as the crow flies form the Mississppi river. I'm 10 miles from a lake known as Big Lake, but that's not a bug out point. Lots of wilderness, but you really don't want to go there. Trust me. We aren't talking about hillbillies(who I get along with) we are taking about river rats, who will kill you before you know they are there.
Reelfoot lake, formed by the afore mentioned earthquakes, as was Big Lake, is, on a normal day about an hour away. But when TSHTF who knows how long it will take.?



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by kettlebellysmith
While a member on ATS I have followed survival threads with great interest. Everyone talks about bugging out, or stocking up on food and water, typically storing in in a basement. My impression is these people have a place to run to, such as a cabin in the woods, or the hills.
My question is this. What about those of us who live in the flatlands? Forget a basement for storage. It will stay full of water in the middle of a drought. And we are too far from any “safe place” to run to.
What suggestions do the survivalists and preppers have for those of us who live in the flat lands? Any serious suggestions will be greatly appreciated.


Don't be afraid to look up. Time is an illusion. This video applies more than any answer you will get.




posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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Cheap solution (depending on numbers of occupants)

(list of supplies

tractor trailer (sleeper cab) aluminum or fiberglass
2-- wide nylon tie down straps with metal rings and ratchets
8 --24" long solid steel pins / re-bar 3/4"
roll -- large heavy plastic / tarp
24" -- 4 inch galvanized duct pipe with exhaust cap with metal roof flashing and screws
4x8 sheet CCA plywood / treated
8 concrete blocks
sand bags / as many as it takes
Sand or Dirt, (your preference, as much as it takes)
Gravel or small stones (as many as it takes)
bag of Climbing ivy or golf grass seed

paper and pencil /skill saw/ drill with bits/ 4" hole saw /screws /metal screw washers/ silicone calking / duck tape/ level / measuring tape / hammer/ BEER


(NOW)

(while drinking beer)


1. find relatively flat spot to set up shelter
2. measure Cab shell
3. use measurements to place reference markers on location. rocks or beer cans will do fine

4. set concrete blocks evenly distributed for each side of your reference markers and level
5. with rocks fill in between blocks for water runoff
6. set sleeper cab on concrete blocks and level
8. 12" inside each corner of cab, drive 2 re-bar pins in an X pattern together, through tie down strap rings, situate strap over cab to accommodate even security, place ratchets on straps, then snug secure cab to ground stakes.
9. measure cab front entrance opening ,then measure mark and cut plywood sheet to fit and cover cab opening, then waterproof / seal plywood with silicon calking, then secure plywood to cab with evenly spaced washers and screws from outside to plywood on the inside
10.calk and duck tape all other seams that need sealed....except the entrance door

11. inside center of cab use drill and 4 inch hole saw, saw hole

12. use plastic or tarp and completely cover cab leaving as much excess laying on the ground but snugged against cab
13. on roof .trim plastic over 4'' vent hole, duck tape plastic around hole to secure to roof, then run a bead of silicone calking around hole, place duct pipe through hole with flashing, set depth to 12 inches or to your preference, then secure with screws, then secure exhaust cap and duct tape all seams
14. with dirt or sand, fill and place sandbags completely around and over sleeper cab, leaving your entrance open, do this until it looks like a mounding pyramid and at least even to your vent cap. you should pyramid shape your doorway as well for even protection. 45 degree should do the trick

then cover entire mound with dirt until sand bags are no longer seen.
15.spread seed and water


A direct strike from an F5 tornado might drag the grass off your shelter, but you wont drown



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by Lil Drummerboy
I live in wisconsin,
about 960 to 1200 ft elevation,,
weather is really never bad.. a few tornadoes once in an while, at least in my
southeast corner of the state.
unless we have a "biblical" flood.. we are rather safe..
Sooo, what is there to prepare for? and define flatlanders





I also live in SE WI. And I have to tell you that you are wrong. Exposure is what will kill most people if the system were to collapse and WI is very very very COLD.



So to survive long term here you would need to be very prepared. Heavy duty shelters and sleeping bags. Heaters and wood burning stoves would be the only way to survive.


You can live 3 weeks without food. 3 days without water. 3 hours without shelter.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by SubTruth
 
SubTruth, I most wholeheartedly agree with you. I live in a large double wide that has a fire place, and I have wood, plenty of blankets, and sleeping bags. However, it is difficult to store food and water and be safe in a mobile home. I admit to having a redneck personality, but I don't have a lot of redneck skills. I'm working on correcting that. Thanks for the input.
By the way, my wife and I have several coats which, depending on the weather, will keep us warm as toast. And LOTS of wool socks,
Southerners don't like being cold!



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by SPECULUM
 
LOL! Love the idea(especially doing the job while drinking beer!) but where would I put my food and water? No room unless I kick out my wife of 34 years. Not gonna get rid of her, 'cause she's shady in the summer and warm in the winter, if you get my drift.





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