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The London Bridge is Falling Down nursery rhyme was from a poem of death by TS Eliot

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posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:30 AM
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I guess I should've realized it but it just angers me so much that children are being taught this song over and over and it's drilled in every kindergarteners head when the poem is about death and the surroundings of death. Why should kindergarteners be taught the song as if it were something really cheery? They're learning something way beyond when they should be learning it... it also angers me that the educational elite have popularized this and made it a classic.

Take a look for yourself if you haven't read it yet

www.poetryarchive.org...

I think most people are good... but, I think a lot of people are gullible. The elite know this, and, they take advantage of people's gullibility. We must fight back by using the same tactic... and bringing them back to their senses so we don't have to anymore. Anyone else notice this? I can't be the only one on here that did.
edit on 23-11-2012 by Frankidealist35 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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Oh shame on you. This has nothing to do with conspiracy. "Ring a ring a rosie" and such songs were songs children sung hundreds of years ago. It has nothing to do with politics.

It's sad that hundreds of years later, people like you have transformed stuff into conspiracy. So much for modern intelligence.

Wow!



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 01:43 AM
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The London Bridge is Falling Down nursery rhyme was from a poem of death by TS Eliot


Not according to the history books. Versions of the rhyme can be traced back as far as the 17th century according to some sources - long before TS Eliot was even a thought or hot flush.

Link 1


It was used by T. S. Eliot at the climax of his poem The Wasteland (1922)
Good old wiki


It is however interesting to look at the "hidden meanings" (and sometimes not even hidden as is the case with Rock-a-bye Baby)...

10 Nursery rhymes and their origins
The true meaning of nursery rhymes


Humpty Dumpty
Some believe that’s because “humpty dumpty” was actually a new type of cannon used in the English Civil War, only to shatter when first lit.

Jack and Jill
the poem is about a couple in 1697 who used to sneak up the hill for some alone time (making “fetch a pail of water” one of the more disturbing euphemisms for “sex”)

London Bridge Is Falling Down
Or it’s about the once-held belief that children were buried alive in the bridge’s foundation as a human sacrifice to what one could only assume were very specific water-spanning gods.
...
And so on
edit on 23-11-2012 by Gemwolf because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


You call other people gullible after a comment like this, you should go hide your head in shame and think about what you have done!

There is references in the rhyme to the great fire of London and its origins probably lie sometime around then too.

And is it really news to you that such rhymes have grim origins? Have you really been that sheltered? The perfect example having already been given ('Ring a ring o Roses' being about catching the black death and dying..)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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Yep,

It is way better for children to be watching television.....heavy sarcasm.....

Seriously, take a look around you friend, there are so many serious bad influences on children these days that your thread seems like an old folk lore of days past......

My kids are more than welcome to go sing a song and play together, wold you rather they be entranced by a video game or Disney television?



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:13 AM
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Oh here is a good one for you. "Ring around the Rosie" is about the plague. Nice innocent childrens song, huh?


Ring around the rosies (lesions of the plague)
Pocket full of posies (used to cover the pungent smell of the plague)
Ashes ashes (burining of the dead)
We all fall down, boom (dropping dead)
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:46 AM
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Frankidealist35

The London Bridge is Falling Down nursery rhyme was from a poem of death by TS Eliot


Mind-boggling. Genuinely mind-boggling. How can your anger, suspicion and misanthropy get in the way of your reasoning to such a great extent?



Originally posted by elouina
Oh here is a good one for you. "Ring around the Rosie" is about the plague. Nice innocent childrens song, huh?


Ring around the rosies (lesions of the plague)
Pocket full of posies (flowers in lapel pocket for funeral)
Ashes ashes (burining of the dead)
We all fall down, boom (dropping dead)
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)


There's no evidence for this though and seems to be more fauxlore than real folklore. The oldest reference to this is less than 150 years old and it's a little odd that there was no reference for it between either the 1300s or the 1600s and the earliest known recorded date of the rhyme in the 1800s despite all the over material written on the black death, plague &c.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:55 AM
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Originally posted by Merriman Weir

Originally posted by elouina
Oh here is a good one for you. "Ring around the Rosie" is about the plague. Nice innocent childrens song, huh?


Ring around the rosies (lesions of the plague)
Pocket full of posies (used to cover the pungent smell of the plague)
Ashes ashes (burining of the dead)
We all fall down, boom (dropping dead)
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)


There's no evidence for this though and seems to be more fauxlore than real folklore. The oldest reference to this is less than 150 years old and it's a little odd that there was no reference for it between either the 1300s or the 1600s and the earliest known recorded date of the rhyme in the 1800s despite all the over material written on the black death, plague &c.


This was taught to me in microbiology as fact. And it certainly makes 100% undeniable sense. Oh and the posies part I rememberd wrong, so I fixed it.
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by biggilo
 


Ok shame on me, maybe I should have been more aware of these things. I just started paying attention to it now. I thought I was the only one that noticed.

Maybe it's not conspiratorial, I just didn't know where originally to put it. But the question is why is it sold to the children as amusement?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by elouina
 


In the uk it was taught to us as...

Atissue, atissue, (sneeze)
We all fall down.

I was taught in school this was about the plague. Or....maybe....predictive programming. Lol



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 07:13 AM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
I guess I should've realized it but it just angers me so much that children are being taught this song over and over and it's drilled in every kindergarteners head when the poem is about death and the surroundings of death. Why should kindergarteners be taught the song as if it were something really cheery? They're learning something way beyond when they should be learning it... it also angers me that the educational elite have popularized this and made it a classic.

Take a look for yourself if you haven't read it yet

www.poetryarchive.org...

I think most people are good... but, I think a lot of people are gullible. The elite know this, and, they take advantage of people's gullibility. We must fight back by using the same tactic... and bringing them back to their senses so we don't have to anymore. Anyone else notice this? I can't be the only one on here that did.
edit on 23-11-2012 by Frankidealist35 because: (no reason given)


If you think that's bad check out ring-a-ring-a-rose's or goosey-goosey gander!
I think some of the English nursery ryhmes are veiled allegory's for darker forces...

Also that smoosh url is a full of disinformation. A moron would do a better job.
edit on 3-12-2012 by WatchRider because: added sentence



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by Merriman Weir

Frankidealist35

The London Bridge is Falling Down nursery rhyme was from a poem of death by TS Eliot


Mind-boggling. Genuinely mind-boggling. How can your anger, suspicion and misanthropy get in the way of your reasoning to such a great extent?



Originally posted by elouina
Oh here is a good one for you. "Ring around the Rosie" is about the plague. Nice innocent childrens song, huh?


Ring around the rosies (lesions of the plague)
Pocket full of posies (flowers in lapel pocket for funeral)
Ashes ashes (burining of the dead)
We all fall down, boom (dropping dead)
edit on 23-11-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)


There's no evidence for this though and seems to be more fauxlore than real folklore. The oldest reference to this is less than 150 years old and it's a little odd that there was no reference for it between either the 1300s or the 1600s and the earliest known recorded date of the rhyme in the 1800s despite all the over material written on the black death, plague &c.


With oral history, endlessly passed down from time immemorial the evidence doesn't have to be written down.



posted on Dec, 3 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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After reading the the article and then doing a bit of research here is what can be stated about such:

Nursery rhymes, were used to try to correct a problem in the past. In the case of London Bridge is falling down, was due to the fact that over the years, the actual bridge did collaspe into the water, causing damage and distruction. The first being made of wood and clay, then stone and mortor, then steele and Iron. Over times there have been houses on the actual bridge, until it was found to be collasping under the very weight.


The rhyme has an older origins in Europe, as well. Some would say that it was from either Denmark, or Germany, or France, or even Italy, and adapted to fit the bridge.

The earliest reference and ultimely mentioned was 1657 in the comedy: The London Chaunticleres, printed in 1657. But some suspect it was a bit older in 1636. The rhyme and variation was used by Henry Carery in his satire Namby Pamby (1725).
Further that is printed in a correspondent in the Gentleman's Magazine in 1823, by a man who claimed to have heard it from a woman who got it during the reign of King Charles II.

TS Eliot was born in the late 1880's. So he could not have written it at all. More likely it was written to try to spur the local goverment into action to fix or rebuild the bridge as it was having structual problems.






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