Ancient Egyptian Necropolis at Umm el-Qaab

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posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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Considered one of the most important archaeological necropolis’ of Ancient Egypt but little known outside of Egyptology, the sacred site ofUmm el-Qa'ab, is located near the ruins of Abydos

The map below shows the location of the necropolis in relation to the more famous Abydos



The scene today



A detail and location of the major burials



The site contains the burials of pre-dynastic kings or nobles

U-J, Serket I sometimes called teh Scorpion King, Iry-Hor and Ka

Iry-Hor the oldest attested ruler of Egypt known by name

Ka Pharaoh of Thinis

There are also nine 1st dynasty tombs and two 2nd dynasty tombs which will be specifally addressed in the next post - now to more general items

Sacrifice was part of the epitaphic rituals of the first dynasty. The sacrificed, such as servant and asses, were expected to assist the pharaoh in the afterlife. The tomb of Djer is associated with the burials of 338 individuals thought to have been sacrificed. The Djer's courtiers were smothered and their tombs all closed at the same time. This practice ended with the conclusion of the dynasty, with the idea of shabtis taking the place of the sacrifices to aid the pharaohs in the afterlife

The tombs of Umm el-Qaab

The tombs themselves













Images of items found in the tombs, Images of items found in the tombs










DAI, German Archaeological Institute The DAI, German Archaeological Institute has been working at the site for 40 years

The site was one of pilgrimage for thousands of years for ancient Egyptians and the most common offerings came in redware pottery





There are acres of these sherds often to the depth of 4 meters

Book on the necropolis books.google.com...=onepage&q=Umm %20el-Qa'ab&f=false




posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


The first dynasty of Egypt

Narmer

Aha

Djer

Djet

Merneith

Den

Anedjib

Semerkhet

Qa'a
edit on 21/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


There are also two second dynasty tombs at Umm El-Qaab

Peribsen

Khasekhemny

His tomb is the most massive at the site


This tomb was on a massive scale, with several interconnecting mud-brick chambers, and the actual burial chamber being constructed of dressed limestone blocks. When excavated by Petrie in 1901 it contained a scepter made from sard and banded with gold, limestone vases with golden covers, and a ewer and basin of bronze


It is in his tomb that we start to see the scaling up of tombs - that would end in the pyramid age and the later faint echo of the rock cut tombs



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


This one is interesting...




posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 12:10 PM
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Awesome!

Before the dynastic rule of Egypt -- how much do we know about their origins? It seems they were able to use gold and move some impressive sized stones even at the begining of dynastic rule.

I suppose my question could be summed up: Where did these people come from, and what evidence do we have that they slowly learned these building and artisan techniques?

BTW, if anyone in Egypt ever needed a new pot -- they knew where to go after sundown



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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hey hanslune

the area you just picked out...is the area i am fascinated with

there is definatley soo much to be found there

oldest..and most under studied

peace



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Okay I'll bite - why?



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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Awesome!

I suppose my question could be summed up: Where did these people come from, and what evidence do we have that they slowly learned these building and artisan techniques?


Who came before the ancient Egyptians

Who came before the ancient Egyptians part II



edit on 21/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2012 @ 07:14 PM
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Star Flag Bump


Thanks for posting this interesting thread. I've enjoyed the information presented.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune









Can you provide more info about this object?



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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reply to post by cowgomoo
 


I was wondering when someone would question what that is....its thought to be a leg off a table. I would think its was part of an ivory statue. No one really knows
edit on 23/11/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
Awesome!

I suppose my question could be summed up: Where did these people come from, and what evidence do we have that they slowly learned these building and artisan techniques?

Who came before the ancient Egyptians

Who came before the ancient Egyptians part II


nubians are not invaders...that came along later...sheesh

ku#es and other southern tribes....became more independant after hykosis rule...
call them whatever...but they are the same race that was pharaoh from before...going back to naqada

a theban IS a kanuz

petrie called the aswan quarry - ethiopian lol....did you go to the same school as him


the builders of the pyramids from aswan are the kanuz nubians, as well as he ruling elite

but yea...seperate them...as black - nubian....white - pharaoh


the ignorance is emmence..i mean your so lost in the translation its unbelievable...

because ku#es are blacks from the south, who invaded the hykosis influenced ramsees period.
BTW, the same people that put ramsees on the throne after tutankhamun...came from ku#e and theban land?
narmer, came from that land.....

you seem like a colonial sympathiser....

Kanuz = gold = nub

but nubians are black...yea...so where the pharaohs

edit on 23-11-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Do you have any link about it? Who discover it?



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by cowgomoo

Originally posted by Hanslune









Can you provide more info about this object?




Bull's leg

Period: Early Dynastic Period
Dynasty: Dynasty 1
Date:ca. 2960–2770 B.C.
Geography:Egypt, Northern Upper Egypt, Abydos
Medium: Ivory
Dimensions:H. 14.2 cm (5 9/16 in)

found it here

the metroplitan museum of art call it a bulls leg, furniture, to support a bed or chair

www.metmuseum.org...
edit on 23-11-2012 by thePharaoh because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 05:36 PM
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Ooooh, I love this kind of stuff. Wish I would of finished getting my degree. I will read through those links before I go shooting off questions. Thanks for the info and I will follow this thread.

Btw, I too had wondered what that odd artifact was.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by thePharaoh


you seem like a colonial sympathiser....


Pharaoh you do realize I was linking to sources? I didn't write them nor do your racist fantasy override others scholarship......



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
nor do your racist fantasy override others scholarship......



the university of whitie gave whitie a scholarship because whitie said pharaohs were whities

think what you like...im only trying to help

peace



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by thePharaoh
 


I won't quote your racist rant

This is a thread on the ancient Egyptian Necropolis at Umm el-Qaab

Care to show the source that used the terminology you claim? No? Well I see you are making stuff up again

I'd suggest you take your racial hate and misrepresentation elsewhere



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


One of the more interesting aspects of the Umm el-Qaab necropolis is that it was here that the first sentence in hieroglyphics is found and also the first Royal names written within a cartouche.


These 'firsts' are found in the tomb of the Pharaoh Peribsen known as Seth-Peribsen or Ash-Peribsen. Unlike many other pharaohs of this dynasty, Peribsen is well-attested in the archaeological records but not the historical record. His name doesn't appear in the Saqarra, Abydos king lists, nor Manetho's Aegyptica. Peribsen's royal name is a subject of interest for Egyptologists as it differs from the traditional practice with its connection to the deity Seth instead of Horus.




A clearer drawing of the inscription



The inscription says: "The golden one/He of Ombos hath unified/handed over the two realms for/to his son, the king of Lower and Upper Egypt, Peribsen". "He of Ombos" is thought to be a name of Seth"

The cartouche

Link to a detailed discussion of how was this Pharaoh and the theories behind his name



Other inscriptions associated with this Pharaoh






 
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