Bill to increase privacy quietly rewritten to destroy privacy

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posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:35 AM
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A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans' e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.

CNET has learned that Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans' e-mail, is scheduled for next week.


The bill was supposed to bolster the peoples privacy online but of course the cops didnt like that.

Leahy himself did an abrupt about face. He once rambled on about his earlier bill protecting Americans and their privacy from the evil government. Now he's letting anyone and everyone see your messages with no warrants:


The list of agencies that would receive civil subpoena authority for the contents of electronic communications also includes the Federal Reserve, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Maritime Commission, the Postal Regulatory Commission, the National Labor Relations Board, and the Mine Enforcement Safety and Health Review Commission.


Good stuff. Is this still Bushes fault? Do people get it yet? D or R, they arent looking out for anyone but themselves and their buddies.

news.cnet.com...




posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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The Fed gets the ability to look at our emails!?!? Double you tee eff! The fed isn't even federally regulated...
edit on 20-11-2012 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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Originally posted by Krazysh0t
The Fed gets the ability to loom at our emails!?!? Double you tee eff! The fed isn't even federally regulated...


Not just emails though that's the most popular example.

It's anything that's stored off-site. Anything in the "cloud."

It's no coincidence that so many services and products are being moved server side.

It's complete control of your access, your files, your software and it can all be looked over at anytime, if this bil should pass, by anyone.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:53 AM
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Originally posted by Krazysh0t
The Fed gets the ability to look at our emails!?!? Double you tee eff! The fed isn't even federally regulated...
edit on 20-11-2012 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



Indeed, why would a Private banking institution need to look at anyone else's emails at all?
Talk about open oppression, when they no longer care about covering their tracks that does not bode well.
Certainly tell us who is really in control here.
edit on 20-11-2012 by Asktheanimals because: added comment



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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Whenever the gubment says they are working to protect your rights, expect those rights to be taken away in some fashion.




posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:58 AM
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What's really sad about this is that most Americans are going to be none the wiser about it as their privacy is literally stripped away from them under the noses. When are the people going to pull their heads out of the sand and pay attention to what the people they elect to lead them are doing in their name and "for their protection"? I'm beginning to hate how we keep getting laws passed in our country that strip our freedoms away and are blatantly unconstitutional and there is no public outcry about it because they attach the string "for your protection" to the end of it. And when anyone asks "protection from what?" they usually say terrorists. However what they don't tell you is that the government's definition of a terrorist is getting broader and broader by the day. If we aren't careful the mere act of viewing ATS could become a terrorist threat.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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To add some substantial creepiness to this bill here's what Leahy said when he started:


“When I led the effort to write the ECPA 25 years ago, no one could have contemplated the many emerging threats to our digital privacy,” said Leahy. “But, today, this law is significantly outdated and out-paced by rapid changes in technology and the changing mission of our law enforcement agencies after September 11. At a time in our history when American consumers and businesses face threats to privacy like no time before, we must renew the commitment to the privacy principles that gave birth to the ECPA a quarter century ago.”
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Feels good to have him looking out for us like that.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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But if I get access of govt officials emails its treason and deserves prison?

That sounds about par for the course.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash

But if I get access of govt officials emails its treason and deserves prison?


Only if you survive the no-knock paramilitary raid on you home.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by FortAnthem


Whenever the gubment says they are working to protect your rights, expect those rights to be taken away in some fashion.



Oh they help alright.

Help ruin everything.
Help trample your civil rights.
Help steal your money.
Help make sure you only believe in lies.
Help restrain and beat you when they decide.

Yeah. " Help. "
I would love to " help " them and return the kind favor.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


Hey lets all go join the govt goon squads so we too can be above the law, rewrite the law, basically do anything we want.

And we can get away with just randomly beating up civilians for any reason, and if they try to block our punches we can charge them with assault and have em in on felonies.

It will be so awesome and fun ruining every thing this nation was built on, lets go sign up today!

NOT!



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere

Originally posted by muzzleflash

But if I get access of govt officials emails its treason and deserves prison?


Only if you survive the no-knock paramilitary raid on you home.


Time to write a letter to your state reps, senators and Govenor.
This is a blatent invasion of privacy.
edit on 20-11-2012 by RedmoonMWC because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 02:06 PM
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So the government gets to spy on you but they skirt the laws themselves such as the EPA email subversion, and I am sure other government agencies do the same.

When is the majority going to acknowledge they have gone way past Orwell?



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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Even if the Federal Reserve was a real Government entity, I don't see why a financial institution would need access to the emails of private citizens.

You know there is an easy way to get around this... use encrypted email. The reality is, criminals who want to hide their communication will use encryption.

The every day folk who don't know how to protect their email communications properly are left swinging in the breeze fully exposed without even knowing it.



posted on Nov, 20 2012 @ 09:50 PM
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So the government now gets to see all of my e-mails? Great. That's just what we all need. These corporate owned, lying, worthless "representatives" of the people failed again. What doesn't the government have the market on anymore? Us losing our rights slowly over time has become quickly over time. Definitely another bad sign. This country is indeed a sinking ship. We all need to grab a lifeboat - and soon I fear.

The joke's on them with my e-mails though... I delete anything they could possibly use and keep all the facebook app alerts in it. Have fun with those you spying, lying, no good worms!!



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 06:53 AM
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Update

It is to be voted on today.


The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a markup on Thursday of Chairman Patrick Leahy's (D-Vt.) bill to require police to obtain a warrant before reading emails, Facebook messages and other forms of electronic communication.
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That article seems to represent the amendment as if the re-write never happened.

So is CNET lying or wrong or are the changes being intentionally hushed?



posted on Nov, 29 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


Good find, may want to keep an eye on this bill and if it is passed, read the full bill to see what is in it. It seems a little strange that CNet would report on the change at first then not mention it when the bill goes to vote.





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